Publications by authors named "Anna Ermacora"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An Unusual Case of Cholestatic Hepatitis due to Light-Chain Deposition Disease.

Case Rep Oncol 2020 Sep-Dec;13(3):1343-1348. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Department of Internal Medicine, ASFO - Pordenone, Pordenone, Italy.

Light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) is a rare paraproteinaemia characterized by the deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulins with a non-fibrillar structure and hence Congo red negative deposits. Kidney disease is the more frequent manifestation, but other organs may also be involved. A 70-year-old man with hypertension and mild chronic renal failure showed a hepatomegaly without splenomegaly. His renal and liver test rapidly got worse. A serum electrophoresis and immunofixation isolated monoclonal kappa light-chain gammopathy, with serum free kappa light chain excess. The bone marrow biopsy showed the presence of interstitial infiltration of plasma cells like multiple myeloma type at initial phase. Periumbilical fat biopsy was negative. Echocardiography demonstrated an infiltrative cardiac disease. The biopsies of the duodenum small intestine mucosa showed flaps with eosinophil material (Masson's staining) with atrophic crypts and chronic inflammation at chorion level. Amyloid substance was negative. There was a strong positivity for light chains kappa compatible with LCDD. A liver biopsy confirmed this finding. Therapy with dexamethasone and bortezomib improved clinical state and hepatic and renal laboratory tests. Chemotherapy based on novel anti-myeloma agents should be rapidly considered in LCDD patients with severe organ involvement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000509508DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7747091PMC
November 2020

Hepatitis C virus-related cryoglobulinemic vasculitis.

Minerva Med 2021 Apr 16;112(2):175-187. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Unit of Clinical of Experimental Onco-Hematology, IRCCS Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano, Pordenone, Italy.

Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects about 170 million people worldwide. HCV is responsible for both hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations. Chronic infection has been shown to develop in about 70% of cases, and it can progress to cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Ten percent of HCV patients may develop extra-hepatic manifestations, including mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CV) varies, ranging from mild-moderate clinical symptoms (purpura on the legs, asthenia and arthralgias) and chronic hepatitis to severe symptoms (ulcers on the legs, peripheral neuropathy, glomerulonephritis, low-grade NHL to life threatening complications (rapid progressive glomerulonephritis, gastrointestinal vasculitis, acute hyper-viscosity).

Evidence Acquisition: CV is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Some studies have shown kidney involvement, cirrhosis, central nervous system involvement, and heart involvement as unfavorable prognostic factors. Many studies have demonstrated that, after antiviral therapy, CV can disappear along with HCV. After the introduction of the new direct antiviral agents (DAAs), the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin has been abandoned.

Evidence Synthesis: Several studies on new DAAs have reported remarkable 90% to 100% HCV eradication rates, regardless of genotype. Treatment with DAAs has comparable efficacy on viral eradication in CV patients but definite clinical improvements of vasculitis can be observed only in half the patients.

Conclusions: In patients with mild to moderate CV disease, DAAs therapy should be used as first line approach. In patients with severe vasculitis, DAAs therapy and a second-line treatment with RTX with or without aphaeresis are a required.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0026-4806.20.07120-7DOI Listing
April 2021

Recent news in the treatment of hepatitis B virus-related cryogobulinemic vasculitis.

Minerva Med 2020 Dec 22;111(6):566-572. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

SMECHIMAI Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that causes hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Twenty percent of HBV patients may develop extra-hepatic manifestations, such as polyarthritis nodosa, glomerulonephritis, dermatitis, poly-arthralgia and arthritis, and aplastic anemia. The association of HBV and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CV) has been highlighted by several epidemiological investigations. CV can develop in 0.5-4% of HBV infected patients. It has been demonstrated that suppression of HBV replication by nucleot(s)ide analogues (NAs) effectively induces clinical response in most patients with mild to moderate CV, but low responses are seen in severe CV. Based on this evidence, NAs therapy represents the first line therapeutic option in subjects with mild or moderate HBV related CV. Peg-interferon-Alfa can be an alternative treatment for HBV related CV, but the few studies published so far have shown no encouraging results. In patients with severe vasculitis and/or skin ulcers, peripheral neuropathy and glomerulonephritis treatment with rituximab (RTX) and NAs should be considered as a first line treatment. The long-term administration of low-medium glucocorticoid doses has been widely used in few studies to control clinical symptoms, but it should be used as a second option, when RTX is ineffective or not tolerated and in association with NAs. This review focuses on novel treatments for HBV related CV.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0026-4806.20.06771-3DOI Listing
December 2020

Real-world experience with decitabine as a first-line treatment in 306 elderly acute myeloid leukaemia patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy.

Hematol Oncol 2019 Oct 20;37(4):447-455. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

UO Ematologia e Trapianto Midollo Osseo, IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Universitario San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.

Despite widespread use of decitabine to treat acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), data on its effectiveness and safety in the real-world setting are scanty. Thus, to analyze the performance of decitabine in clinical practice, we pooled together patient-level data of three multicentric observational studies conducted since 2013 throughout Italy, including 306 elderly AML patients (median age 75 years), unfit for intensive chemotherapy, treated with first-line decitabine therapy at the registered schedule of 20 mg/m /iv daily for 5 days every 4 weeks. Overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) curves, and multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause mortality were computed. Overall, 1940 cycles of therapy were administered (median, 5 cycles/patient). A total of 148 subjects were responders and, therefore, ORR was 48.4%. Seventy-one patients (23.2%) had complete remission, 32 (10.5%) had partial remission, and 45 (14.7%) had haematologic improvement. Median OS was 11.6 months for patients with favourable-intermediate cytogenetic risk and 7.9 months for those with adverse cytogenetic risk. Median relapse-free survival after CR was 10.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7-16.0). In multivariate analysis, mortality was higher in patients with adverse cytogenetic risk (HR=1.58; 95% CI: 1.13-2.21) and increased continuously with white blood cell (WBC) count (HR=1.12; 95% CI: 1.06-1.18). A total of 183 infectious adverse events occurred in 136 patients mainly (>90%) within the first five cycles of therapy. This pooled analysis of clinical care studies confirmed, outside of clinical trials, the effectiveness of decitabine as first-line therapy for AML in elderly patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy. An adverse cytogenetic profile and a higher WBC count at diagnosis were, in this real life setting, unfavourable predictors of survival.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.2663DOI Listing
October 2019

Efficacy and toxicity of Decitabine in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): A multicenter real-world experience.

Leuk Res 2019 01 28;76:33-38. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Clinica Ematologica, Centro Trapianti e Terapie Cellulari, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata, Udine, Italy.

Background: The hypomethylating agent Decitabine (DAC) is a valuable treatment option in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), particularly in elderly patients (pts) not suitable for intensive chemotherapy (CHT). However, limited data are available about efficacy and safety of DAC in clinical practice.

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data of 104 AML pts treated with DAC in eight Italian Hematological Centers from 2015 to 2017. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DAC in older AML pts outside of clinical trial. Seventy-five (75%) pts received DAC as first line treatment (Cohort 1) and 29 pts as salvage therapy (Cohort 2). All pts received a DAC schedule of 20 mg/sqm IV for 5-days, every 28 days. The median age was 72.5 years (74 in cohort 1 and 66 in cohort 2) and 16% of pts had an ECOG performance status >2 at the start of DAC treatment (with non-significant difference in the two cohorts). The cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS) was > 6 in 27% of pts. Forty-five pts (43%) had secondary AML. Bone marrow blast count was > 30% in 64% of patients (67/104). In the relapsed cohort 17/29 (59%) patients were treated with DAC after conventional CHT, 5/29 (17%) after allo-SCT and 7/29 (24%) after azacitidine therapy.

Results: A total of 469 DAC cycles were given to the 104 pts with a median of 3 cycles (range 1-21) and 45/104 (43%) pts received > 4 cycles. The Overall Response Rate (ORR = Complete Remission-CR plus Partial Remission-PR) was 33%, significantly higher in Cohort 1 (42%) compared to Cohort 2 (14%) (p = 0.009). The median duration of response was 6 months (range 1-20). In Cohort 1 the best response (CR or PR) was obtained between 3th and 6th cycle. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, achievement of CR or PR (HR = 0.78; p = 0.0004), CIRS < 6 (HR = 0.9; p = 0.04) and complex karyotype (HR = 0.8; p = 0.03) were significant predictors of better overall survival (OS). Median OS from the start of DAC therapy was 11 months for the whole population with a significant OS advantage in Cohort 1 (median OS 12.7 mths vs 6.3 mths; p = 0.003); median OS was significantly longer in responders compared to non-responders (22.6 mths vs 5.7 mths; p < 0.0001). At the last follow-up, 56 patients (54%) are still alive and 48 (46%) are dead (71% due to disease progression). The most common toxicities were myelosuppression and documented infectious complications that occurred mainly during the first 4 cycles.

Conclusion: These data confirm the efficacy (ORR 33%) and the acceptable safety profile of DAC in the real life management of AML in elderly pts unsuitable for intensive CHT, with a significant better performance in first line therapy (ORR 42%, median OS 12.7 mths). The efficacy of DAC, both in first line and as salvage therapy, may probably be improved with combined treatment strategies and/or with different DAC schedules that could increase its anti-leukemic effect.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2018.11.015DOI Listing
January 2019

Low-dose radiotherapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

Hematol Oncol 2017 Dec 25;35(4):472-479. Epub 2016 Oct 25.

Clinical and Experimental Onco-Hematology Unit, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy.

Low-dose radiotherapy (LDRT) given in 2 × 2 Gy is a highly effective and safe treatment for palliation of indolent lymphomas. Otherwise, very little regarding the use of LDRT for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been investigated. We designed a phase 2 trial of LDRT in patients with DLBCL with indication for palliative radiation. Low-dose radiotherapy was administered on symptomatic areas only. Clinical response was assessed 21 days after LDRT and defined as reduction >50% of maximum diameter of the radiated lesions. Quality of life was scored by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Tumor subtype (germinal center B-cell type versus activated B-cell type) and the presence of TP53 mutations in pathologic specimens of the target lesion were also evaluated. Twenty-three of twenty-five radiated patients were evaluable for response, and 2 died of disease before the visit at 21 days. The overall response rate was 70% (16 of 23 patients), with 7 complete responses and 9 partial responses (mean duration of response, 6 months; range, 1-39 months). Fifteen patients answered to the QLQ-C30 questionnaires, and an improved quality of life was documented in 9 cases. TP53 mutations were detected in 2 of 6 (33%) nonresponders and in none of the responders (P = .12). Germinal center B-cell type responded better than activated B-cell type (response rate was 83% and 29%, respectively, P = .01). These findings indicate that LDRT is effective for palliation in patients with DLBCL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.2368DOI Listing
December 2017

P-glycoprotein, lung resistance-related protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein in de novo adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

Br J Haematol 2002 Mar;116(3):519-27

Division of Haematology, Department of Medical and Morphological Research, University Hospital, Udine, Italy.

P-glycoprotein (P-gp), lung resistance-related protein (LRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) expression, and blast cell intracellular daunorubicin accumulation (IDA) were evaluated in 95 previously untreated cases of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) using flow cytometry. Forty-five out of 95 (47%) patients were P-gp positive (+), 12/66 (18%) were LRP+ and 11/66 (17%) were MRP+. Eighteen out of 66 (28%) patients showed a simultaneous multidrug resistance (MDR)-related protein expression higher than controls for more than one protein, while 24/66 (36%) cases did not overexpress any protein. Twenty-one out of 24 (87%) cases overexpressing at least one MDR-related protein had a defect in accumulating daunorubicin into their blast cells, while only 4/24 (16%) cases who did not overexpress any protein had similar features. The complete remission rates were similar in MDR-positive and -negative (-) patients but relapses within 6 months were more frequent in P-gp+ cases, and therefore the disease-free survival duration was shorter in P-gp+ than in P-gp- patients (P = 0.01). The number of MRP+ and/or LRP+ cases was too small to be able to draw any conclusion on their role in affecting or predicting therapy outcome. In conclusion, P-gp overexpression associated with a defect in daunorubicin accumulation is a frequent feature in adult ALL at onset and seems to be related to poorer therapy outcome and, consequently, a shorter disease-free survival. LRP and MRP overexpression seems to be a rare event and no conclusion can be drawn on its prognostic role.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.0007-1048.2001.03322.xDOI Listing
March 2002