Publications by authors named "Anna Boguslawska"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Metabolic Disorders/Obesity Is a Primary Risk Factor in Hidradenitis Suppurativa: An Immunohistochemical Real-World Approach.

Dermatology 2021 Jul 22:1-9. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Departments of Dermatology, Venereology, Allergology and Immunology, Dessau Medical Center, Brandenburg Medical School Theodor Fontane and Faculty of Health Sciences Brandenburg, Dessau, Germany.

Background: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is an inflammatory, potentially scarring disease of the hair follicle, affecting the apocrine gland-bearing skin areas. The major comorbid disorders associated with the occurrence or the aggravation of the disease are obesity and smoking. Numerous efforts to dissociate these factors led to controversial results.

Objectives: To assess the importance of metabolic disorders/obesity, smoking/environmental toxins, and inflammation in HS by utilizing the differential expression of major relevant protein markers in lesional skin of obese/smoking versus non-obese/non-smoking HS patients.

Methods: Lesional skin specimens deriving from two groups of HS patients (BMI >30 and smokers, n = 12 vs. BMI <30 and non-smokers, n = 10) were stained with antibodies raised against irisin, PPARγ, and IGF-1R, which correlate with metabolic disorders/obesity, EGFR and AhR, associated with smoking, and IL-17, IL-17R, and S100A8, as markers of inflammation.

Results: Metabolic disorders/obesity-related markers exhibited marked differential expression between the two groups, while smoking-associated markers a limited one. IL-17R expression was stronger in obese/smokers, and S100A8 staining exhibited intense strong immunoreactivity in both groups without significant difference.

Conclusions: The notion that obesity plays a role in HS development appears to be supported by the prominent regulation of the associated lesional biomarkers. Tobacco smoking might contribute less to HS than previously suspected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000517017DOI Listing
July 2021

Heterogeneity of the Clinical Presentation of the MEN1 LRG_509 c.781C>T (p.Leu261Phe) Variant Within a Three-Generation Family.

Genes (Basel) 2021 03 31;12(4). Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Department of Endocrinology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 31-008 Cracow, Poland.

Multiple neuroendocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare genetic disorder with an autosomal dominant inheritance, predisposing carriers to benign and malignant tumors. The phenotype of MEN1 syndrome varies between patients in terms of tumor localization, age of onset, and clinical aggressiveness, even between affected members within the same family. We describe a heterogenic phenotype of the variant c.781C>T (LRG_509t1), which was previously reported only once in a family with isolated hyperparathyroidism. A heterozygous missense variant in exon 4 of the gene was identified in the sequence of the gene, i.e., c.781C>T, leading to the amino acid change p.Leu261Phe in a three-generation family. In the screened family, 5/6 affected members had already developed hyperparathyroidism. In the index patient and two other family members, an aggressive course of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (insulinoma and non-functioning neuroendocrine tumors) with dissemination was diagnosed. In the index patient, late diagnosis and slow progression of the disseminated neuroendocrine tumor have been observed (24 years of follow-up). The very rare variant of , LRG_509t1 c.781C>T /p.Leu261Phe (LRG_509p1), diagnosed within a three-generation family has a heterogenic clinical presentation. Further follow-up of the family members should be carried out to confirm the spectrum and exact time of clinical presentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes12040512DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8067145PMC
March 2021

Genetics of Acromegaly and Gigantism.

J Clin Med 2021 Mar 29;10(7). Epub 2021 Mar 29.

Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK.

Growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumours represent the most genetically determined pituitary tumour type. This is true both for germline and somatic mutations. Germline mutations occur in several known genes (, , , , , , , ) as well as familial cases with currently unknown genes, while somatic mutations in are present in up to 40% of tumours. If the disease starts before the fusion of the epiphysis, then accelerated growth and increased final height, or gigantism, can develop, where a genetic background can be identified in half of the cases. Hereditary GH-secreting pituitary adenoma (PA) can manifest as isolated tumours, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) including cases with mutations or duplications (X-linked acrogigantism, XLAG) or can be a part of systemic diseases like multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 or type 4, McCune-Albright syndrome, Carney complex or phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma-pituitary adenoma association. Family history and a search for associated syndromic manifestations can help to draw attention to genetic causes; many of these are now tested as part of gene panels. Identifying genetic mutations allows appropriate screening of associated comorbidities as well as finding affected family members before the clinical manifestation of the disease. This review focuses on germline and somatic mutations predisposing to acromegaly and gigantism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071377DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8036715PMC
March 2021

The Skin as a Mirror of Internal Disease: Comorbidities and Epidemiology of Acne Vulgaris and Adult Female Acne - A Cross-sectional Study and Current State of Knowledge.

Acta Dermatovenerol Croat 2020 Dec;28(3):133-140

Katarzyna P. Kaleta, MD, Department of Dermatology Jagiellonian University Medical College, 8 Skawinska St, 30-066 Krakow, Poland;

Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition affecting an increasing number of adults and might be a clue to identifying systemic disease. Objective of this study is assessment of the demographic and clinical characteristic, including comorbidities, of patients with acne with a special focus on adult female acne (AFA). This cross-sectional study analyzed the medical records of 354 patients with acne (323 outpatients and 31 hospitalized). Data concerning patient age, sex, lesions morphology and distribution on body areas, duration of the disease, Body Mass Index, and dermatologic and systemic comorbidities were collected. 61% of all patients were female, 45.37% of women were classified as AFA. The median age of patients with acne was 24 years and 32.5 years for AFA. The face was the most commonly affected area; patients with AFA had lesions on their back than less frequently non-AFA. Predominant eruptions were pustules and papules. 38.7% of patients had concomitant systemic chronic disease, 15.25% had an endocrinologic disorder, and 6.21% had thyroid gland dysfunction. Women with AFA had endocrinologic disorders more frequently (P=0.002), whereas cutaneous signs of hyperandrogenism were observed less frequently than in the non-AFA group (P=0.034). AFA possess distinct clinical features and it should raise suspicion towards possible underlying endocrinologic disturbance.
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December 2020

Acromegaly and late-onset primary hyperparathyroidism in a female with a rare MEN1 gene variant of yet undetermined clinical significance (p.Val167Ala).

Endokrynol Pol 2020 30;71(6):579-580. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Department of Endocrinology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/EP.a2020.0063DOI Listing
October 2020
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