Publications by authors named "Ann Saterbak"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multidisciplinary Development of a Low-Cost Gastroschisis Silo for Use in Sub-Saharan Africa.

J Surg Res 2020 11 6;255:565-574. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Electronic address:

Background: Gastroschisis silos are often unavailable in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), contributing to high mortality. We describe a collaboration between engineers and surgeons in the United States and Uganda to develop a silo from locally available materials.

Methods: Design criteria included the following: < $5 cost, 5 ± 0.25 cm opening diameter, deformability of the opening construct, ≥ 500 mL volume, ≥ 30 N tensile strength, no statistical difference in the leakage rate between the low-cost silo and preformed silo, ease of manufacturing, and reusability. Pugh scoring matrices were used to assess designs. Materials considered included the following: urine collection bags, intravenous bags, or zipper storage bags for the silo and female condom rings or O-rings for the silo opening construct. Silos were assembled with clothing irons and sewn with thread. Colleagues in Uganda, Malawi, Tanzania, and Kenya investigated material cost and availability.

Results: Urine collection bags and female condom rings were chosen as the most accessible materials. Silos were estimated to cost < $1 in SSA. Silos yielded a diameter of 5.01 ± 0.11 cm and a volume of 675 ± 7 mL. The iron + sewn seal, sewn seal, and ironed seal on the silos yielded tensile strengths of 31.1 ± 5.3 N, 30.1 ± 2.9 N, and 14.7 ± 2.4 N, respectively, compared with the seal of the current standard-of-care silo of 41.8 ± 6.1 N. The low-cost silos had comparable leakage rates along the opening and along the seal with the spring-loaded preformed silo. The silos were easily constructed by biomedical engineering students within 15 min. All silos were able to be sterilized by submersion.

Conclusions: A low-cost gastroschisis silo was constructed from materials locally available in SSA. Further in vivo and clinical studies are needed to determine if mortality can be improved with this design.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2020.05.037DOI Listing
November 2020

Fifty Years of Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Education.

Ann Biomed Eng 2020 Jun 6;48(6):1590-1615. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Biomedical Engineering Department, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, USA.

Undergraduate education in biomedical engineering (BME) and bioengineering (BioE) has been in place for more than 50 years. It has been important in shaping the field as a whole. The early undergraduate programs developed shortly after BME graduate programs, as universities sought to capitalize on the interest of students and the practical advantages of having BME departments that could control their own resources and curriculum. Unlike other engineering fields, BME did not rely initially on a market for graduates in industry, although BME graduates subsequently have found many opportunities. BME undergraduate programs exploded in the 2000s with funding from the Whitaker Foundation and resources from other agencies such as the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. The number of programs appears to be reaching a plateau, with 118 accredited programs in the United States at present. We show that there is a core of material that most undergraduates are expected to know, which is different from the knowledge base of other engineers not only in terms of biology, but in the breadth of engineering. We also review the role of important organizations and conferences in the growth of BME, special features of BME education, first placements of BME graduates, and a few challenges to address in the future.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-020-02494-0DOI Listing
June 2020

Using a Teaching Intervention and Calibrated Peer Review™ Diagnostics to Improve Visual Communication Skills.

Ann Biomed Eng 2018 Mar 3;46(3):513-524. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Program in Writing and Communication, Rice University, 6100 Main St - MS 630, Houston, TX, 77005, USA.

Rice University's bioengineering department incorporates written, oral, and visual communication instruction into its undergraduate curriculum to aid student learning and to prepare students to communicate their knowledge and discoveries precisely and persuasively. In a tissue culture lab course, we used a self- and peer-review tool called Calibrated Peer Review™ (CPR) to diagnose student learning gaps in visual communication skills on a poster assignment. We then designed an active learning intervention that required students to practice the visual communication skills that needed improvement and used CPR to measure the changes. After the intervention, we observed that students performed significantly better in their ability to develop high quality graphs and tables that represent experimental data. Based on these outcomes, we conclude that guided task practice, collaborative learning, and calibrated peer review can be used to improve engineering students' visual communication skills.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-017-1946-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5809568PMC
March 2018

Maji: a new tool to prevent overhydration of children receiving intravenous fluid therapy in low-resource settings.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2015 May 2;92(5):1053-8. Epub 2015 Mar 2.

Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas; Rice 360°, Institute for Global Health Technologies, Rice University, Houston, Texas; 3rd Stone Design, San Rafael, California; Department of Paediatrics, Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi

We designed and evaluated the accuracy and usability of a device to regulate the volume of fluid dispensed during intravenous drip therapy. The mechanical system was developed in response to a pressing need articulated by clinicians in pediatric wards throughout sub-Saharan Africa, who require a tool to prevent overhydration in children receiving intravenous fluid in settings that lack burettes or electronic infusion pumps. The device is compatible with most intravenous bags and limits the volume dispensed to a preset amount that can be adjusted in 50 mL increments. Laboratory accuracy over a range of clinically-relevant flow rates, initial bag volumes, and target volumes was within 12.0 mL of the target volume. The ease of use is "excellent," with a mean system usability score of 84.4 out of 100. Use of the device limits the volume of fluid dispensed during intravenous therapy and could potentially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with overhydration in children receiving intravenous therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.14-0495DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4426563PMC
May 2015

Educational methods and best practices in BME laboratories.

Ann Biomed Eng 2006 Feb 7;34(2):209-16. Epub 2006 Mar 7.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-005-9030-3DOI Listing
February 2006
-->