Publications by authors named "Ann P Kinzig"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Linking ecosystem characteristics to final ecosystem services for public policy.

Ecol Lett 2015 Jan 14;18(1):108-18. Epub 2014 Nov 14.

State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China; School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA.

Governments worldwide are recognising ecosystem services as an approach to address sustainability challenges. Decision-makers need credible and legitimate measurements of ecosystem services to evaluate decisions for trade-offs to make wise choices. Managers lack these measurements because of a data gap linking ecosystem characteristics to final ecosystem services. The dominant method to address the data gap is benefit transfer using ecological data from one location to estimate ecosystem services at other locations with similar land cover. However, benefit transfer is only valid once the data gap is adequately resolved. Disciplinary frames separating ecology from economics and policy have resulted in confusion on concepts and methods preventing progress on the data gap. In this study, we present a 10-step approach to unify concepts, methods and data from the disparate disciplines to offer guidance on overcoming the data gap. We suggest: (1) estimate ecosystem characteristics using biophysical models, (2) identify final ecosystem services using endpoints and (3) connect them using ecological production functions to quantify biophysical trade-offs. The guidance is strategic for public policy because analysts need to be: (1) realistic when setting priorities, (2) attentive to timelines to acquire relevant data, given resources and (3) responsive to the needs of decision-makers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ele.12389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4311437PMC
January 2015

Merging economics and epidemiology to improve the prediction and management of infectious disease.

Ecohealth 2014 Dec 19;11(4):464-75. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA,

Mathematical epidemiology, one of the oldest and richest areas in mathematical biology, has significantly enhanced our understanding of how pathogens emerge, evolve, and spread. Classical epidemiological models, the standard for predicting and managing the spread of infectious disease, assume that contacts between susceptible and infectious individuals depend on their relative frequency in the population. The behavioral factors that underpin contact rates are not generally addressed. There is, however, an emerging a class of models that addresses the feedbacks between infectious disease dynamics and the behavioral decisions driving host contact. Referred to as "economic epidemiology" or "epidemiological economics," the approach explores the determinants of decisions about the number and type of contacts made by individuals, using insights and methods from economics. We show how the approach has the potential both to improve predictions of the course of infectious disease, and to support development of novel approaches to infectious disease management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10393-014-0963-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4366543PMC
December 2014

Social Norms and Global Environmental Challenges: The Complex Interaction of Behaviors, Values, and Policy.

Bioscience 2013 Mar;63(3):164-175

UCI Distinguished Professor, Mathematics and Economics, Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-5100,

Government policies are needed when people's behaviors fail to deliver the public good. Those policies will be most effective if they can stimulate long-term changes in beliefs and norms, creating and reinforcing the behaviors needed to solidify and extend the public good.It is often the short-term acceptability of potential policies, rather than their longer-term efficacy, that determines their scope and deployment. The policy process should consider both time scales. The academy, however, has provided insufficient insight on the coevolution of social norms and different policy instruments, thus compromising the capacity of decision makers to craft effective solutions to the society's most intractable environmental problems. Life scientists could make fundamental contributions to this agenda through targeted research on the emergence of social norms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/bio.2013.63.3.5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4136381PMC
March 2013

Biodiversity loss and its impact on humanity.

Nature 2012 Jun 6;486(7401):59-67. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

The most unique feature of Earth is the existence of life, and the most extraordinary feature of life is its diversity. Approximately 9 million types of plants, animals, protists and fungi inhabit the Earth. So, too, do 7 billion people. Two decades ago, at the first Earth Summit, the vast majority of the world's nations declared that human actions were dismantling the Earth's ecosystems, eliminating genes, species and biological traits at an alarming rate. This observation led to the question of how such loss of biological diversity will alter the functioning of ecosystems and their ability to provide society with the goods and services needed to prosper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11148DOI Listing
June 2012

Learning from the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change Impacts.

Environ Sci Technol 2005 Dec;39(23):9023-32

Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.

The U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change was a federally coordinated nationwide effort that involved thousands of experts and stakeholders. To draw lessons from this effort, the 10 authors of this paper, half of whom were not involved in the Assessment, developed and administered an extensive survey, prepared a series of working papers, and conducted an invitational workshop in Washington, DC, on April 29, 2004. Considering all these sources, the authors conclude that the Assessment was largely successful in implementing its basic design of distributed stakeholder involvement and in achieving its basic objectives. Future assessments could be significantly improved if greater attention were devoted to developing a collective understanding of objectives, preparing guidance materials and providing training for assessment participants, developing a budgeting mechanism which would allow greater freedom in allocating resources across various assessment activities, and creating an environment in which assessments were part of an ongoing process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es050865iDOI Listing
December 2005

Self-similarity, the power law form of the species-area relationship, and a probability rule: a reply to Maddux.

Am Nat 2004 Apr 19;163(4):627-33. Epub 2004 Apr 19.

Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/382663DOI Listing
April 2004
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