Publications by authors named "Ann M Rogers"

76 Publications

Interventional Radiology Obesity Therapeutics: Proceedings from the Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation Research Consensus Panel.

J Vasc Interv Radiol 2021 09;32(9):1388.e1-1388.e14

Division of Interventional Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address:

The Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation commissioned a Research Consensus Panel to establish a research agenda on "Obesity Therapeutics" in interventional radiology (IR). The meeting convened a multidisciplinary group of physicians and scientists with expertise in obesity therapeutics. The meeting was intended to review current evidence on obesity therapies, familiarize attendees with the regulatory evaluation process, and identify research deficiencies in IR bariatric interventions, with the goal of prioritizing future high-quality research that would move the field forward. The panelists agreed that a weight loss of >8%-10% from baseline at 6-12 months is a desirable therapeutic endpoint for future IR weight loss therapies. The final consensus on the highest priority research was to design a blinded randomized controlled trial of IR weight loss interventions versus sham control arms, with patients receiving behavioral therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir.2021.05.029DOI Listing
September 2021

Bariatric Surgery is Safe for Patients After Recovery from COVID-19.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2021 Jul 31. Epub 2021 Jul 31.

Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Mount Auburn Hospital, Waltham, Massachusetts.

Background: Studies of patients who have undergone surgery while infected with COVID-19 have shown increased risks for adverse outcomes in both pulmonary complications and mortality. It has become clear that the risk of complications from perioperative COVID-19 infection must be weighed against the risk from delayed surgical treatment. Studies have also shown that prior bariatric surgery conveys protection against mortality from COVID-19 and that obesity is the biggest risk factor for mortality from COVID-19 infection in adults under 45 years of age. Studies in patients who have fully recovered from COVID-19 and underwent elective surgery have not become widely available yet.

Objectives: This multi-institutional case series is presented to highlight patients who developed COVID-19, fully recovered, and subsequently underwent elective bariatric surgery with 30-day outcomes available.

Setting: Nine bariatric surgery centers located across the United States.

Methods: This multicenter case series is a retrospective chart review of patients who developed COVID-19, recovered, and subsequently underwent bariatric surgery. Fifty-three patients are included, and 30-day morbidity and mortality were analyzed.

Results: Thirty-day complications included esophageal spasm, dehydration, and ileus. There were no cardiovascular, venous thromboembolism (VTE) or respiratory events reported. There were no 30- day mortalities.

Conclusions: Bariatric surgery has been safely performed in patients who made a full recovery from COVID-19 without increased complications due to cardiovascular, pulmonary, venous thromboembolism, or increased mortality rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2021.07.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8324486PMC
July 2021

Predictors of surgical intervention for those seeking bariatric surgery.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2021 Sep 21;17(9):1558-1565. Epub 2021 Jun 21.

Department of Surgery-Division of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Penn State Health, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Background: Bariatric surgery has been found to be effective in the treatment of severe obesity. Studies have shown that the majority of eligible patients do not undergo surgery.

Objectives: It is important to identify variables that may impact patient decision making and potentially lead to the disproportionate underutilization of bariatric surgery.

Setting: The study was conducted at one academic medical center in central Pennsylvania.

Methods: Bariatric patients who participated in a preoperative psychological assessment from 2017 to early 2020 completed comprehensive self-report questionnaires addressing sociodemographic variables, health history, psychopathology, and eating behaviors. Body mass index was calculated based on clinical measurements of each patient at the start of the preoperative program. Sociodemographic variables and self-report instrument scores were compared between those who completed surgery and those who did not.

Results: Of the 1234 participants, significant differences were found between the compared variables. All minority groups were less likely to undergo surgery than White patients. Participants reporting higher impairment were less likely to progress to surgery. Impairments across 3 behavioral eating assessments were associated with a lower likelihood of surgery.

Conclusion: There are multiple factors that contribute to patient progression to surgery, and ultimately whether the patient undergoes bariatric surgery. Results show a need for further investigation surrounding the sociodemographic and psychosocial variables that influence the patient's advancement to surgery. Both providers and patients could benefit from a deeper understanding of potential barriers to utilization of bariatric surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2021.06.003DOI Listing
September 2021

Evaluating the need for dermatological care in a postsurgical bariatric sample.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2021 Jul 28;17(7):1302-1309. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Department of Surgery, Division of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Background: Bariatric surgery rates are increasing in tandem with obesity in the United States. patients after surgery bariatric can lose up to or more than one-third of their excess weight within the first year. This sudden loss of weight can lead to skin redundancy and increased susceptibility to dermatological issues. There is a paucity of literature addressing the issue of skin redundancy and associated factors following bariatric surgery.

Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of dermatological concerns among postbariatric surgery patients and assess the impact of these issues on patients' quality of life.

Setting: Surgical Weight Loss Clinic at an academic medical center in south-central Pennsylvania.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was administered from September 9 to November 30, 2020 to adult postoperative patients. Data were collected via self-report questionnaires with a retest issued approximately 72 hours later. The survey included questions regarding occurrences of skin disturbances and the Dermatology Life Quality Index. All analyses were conducted using SAS version 9.4.

Results: A total of 575 patients were invited to participate, with 103 participating and 69 completing the retest. The health questionnaire indicated that 69.6% of patients had challenges with skin rashes or irritation due to loose skin; 80.6% were interested in having skin removal surgery; and only 5.8% were referred to a dermatologist for their concerns.

Conclusion: The presence of skin concerns was associated with impaired HRQOL among postbariatric patients. This suggests a need to further educate the bariatric interdisciplinary team to evaluate the impacts of skin pathology on postbariatric patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2021.03.021DOI Listing
July 2021

Comment on: Providing access to affordable bariatric surgery for uninsured Denver county residents: description of a successful public health initiative.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2021 06 18;17(6):e25. Epub 2021 Mar 18.

Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2021.03.011DOI Listing
June 2021

ASMBS position statement on the rationale for performance of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy before and after metabolic and bariatric surgery.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2021 May 19;17(5):837-847. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Division of Minimally Invasive Surgery/Bariatrics, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

The following position statement is issued by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in response to inquiries made to the Society by patients, physicians, society members, hospitals, health insurance payors, the media, and others regarding the need and possible strategies for screening endoscopic examination before metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS), as well as the rationale, indications, and strategies for postoperative surveillance for mucosal abnormalities, including gastroesophageal reflux disease and associated esophageal mucosal injuries (erosive esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus) that may develop in the long term after MBS, specifically for patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The general principles described here may also apply to procedures such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) and BPD with duodenal switch (DS); however, the paucity of procedure-specific literature for BPD and DS limits the value of this statement to those procedures. In addition, children with obesity undergoing MBS may have unique considerations and are not specifically addressed in this position statement. This recommendation is based on current clinical knowledge, expert opinion, and published peer-reviewed scientific evidence available at this time. The statement is not intended to be and should not be construed as stating or establishing a local, regional, or national standard of care. The statement will be revised in the future as additional evidence becomes available.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2021.03.007DOI Listing
May 2021

Revisional Bariatric Surgery.

Surg Clin North Am 2021 Apr;101(2):213-222

Minimally Invasive and Bariatric Surgery, Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Electronic address:

Revisional bariatric surgery is a growing subset of all bariatric procedures. Although revisions can be associated with higher morbidity rates and less optimal outcomes than those seen with primary procedures, they can be safely performed, with excellent outcomes and improved quality of life for patients. Facility and familiarity with revisional principles and techniques are necessary components of bariatric surgical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.suc.2020.12.008DOI Listing
April 2021

Comment on: Transversus abdominis plane block using a short-acting local anesthetic reduces pain and opioid consumption after laparoscopic bariatric surgery: a meta-analysis.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2021 05 4;17(5):857. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2021.01.030DOI Listing
May 2021

Safety of bariatric surgery in patients with coronary artery disease.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2020 Dec 23;16(12):2031-2037. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Electronic address:

Background: Patients with obesity and established coronary artery disease (CAD) may benefit from surgical weight loss; however, its safety is unknown in this population.

Objective: To assess the association between CAD and the incidence of 30-day postoperative mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

Settings: Multicenter cohort study.

Methods: We used the 2017 MBSAQIP database to study patients undergoing bariatric surgery from accredited centers in the United States and Canada between Jan 1, 2017, and Dec 31, 2017. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine whether established CAD was independently associated with 30-day mortality and MACE, a composite endpoint that included myocardial infarction and/or cardiac arrest.

Results: We reviewed data from 167,819 patients from 832 centers. There were 4172 patients with diagnosed CAD, and 163,647 without it. At 30-day follow-up, the endpoints of mortality, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, and MACE occurred in 172 (.10%), 82 (.05%), 57 (.03%), and 135 (.08%) patients, respectively. The endpoints occurred more significantly in patients with CAD compared with patients without CAD; 22 (.53%) versus 150 (.09%) for mortality, 13 (.31%) versus 69 (.04%) for cardiac arrest, 17 (.41%) versus 40 (.02%) for myocardial infarction, and 28 (.67%) versus 107 (.07%) for MACE (P < .001 for all comparisons).

Conclusions: Postoperative mortality and MACE following bariatric surgery are higher in patients with CAD than those without; however, the absolute incidence is low (<1%). The decision to pursue bariatric surgery and/or preoperative cardiac testing in patients with CAD should include consideration of the overall incidence of adverse cardiac outcomes and the stability of CAD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2020.07.015DOI Listing
December 2020

Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy in patients with complex abdominal wall hernias.

Surg Endosc 2021 07 28;35(7):3881-3889. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Department of Surgery, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, M.C. H149, Hershey, PA, 17033, USA.

Background: Patients with severe obesity and complex abdominal wall hernias (CAWH) present a challenging clinical dilemma. Their body mass index (BMI) is often prohibitive of successful ventral hernia repair (VHR) and the CAWH presents technical challenges when pursuing bariatric surgery. Our hernia center policy is to refer patients with severe obesity for evaluation with the surgical weight loss program. This study describes outcomes of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in patients with both severe obesity and CAWH.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on data prospectively collected between 2014 and 2020. CAWH patients referred for and undergoing LSG were included. Revisional bariatric surgery patients were excluded. The dataset was augmented with operative time, BMI changes, length of stay (LOS), hernia characteristics, postoperative complications, time from referral to weight loss surgery, and time from LSG to VHR.

Results: Twenty patients (10 males, mean age 54.3 years) met inclusion criteria. Mean BMI at LSG was 45.6 ± 6.1 kg/m. Mean hernia area was 494.9 ± 221.2 cm and 90% had hernia extension into the subxiphoid and/or epigastric regions. Mean time from bariatric referral to LSG was 10.5 ± 5.4 months. Mean LSG operative time was 121.2 ± 50.3 min, and mean LOS was 1.6 ± 0.8 days. One patient had postoperative bleeding necessitating laparoscopic re-exploration. There were no readmissions. Sixteen patients subsequently underwent VHR on average13.5 ± 11.7 months later and on average 22.6 ± 12.5 months after initial hernia consultation. Two patients had a hernia-related complication between the period of initial hernia consultation and ultimate repair. Mean BMI was 37.5 ± 7.5 kg/m (mean 20.7 ± 12.3% decrease, p < 0.0001) at mean follow-up of 27.2 ± 17.2 months.

Conclusions: LSG can be performed successfully even in patients with CAWH. Outcomes do not appear to differ significantly from typical patients undergoing LSG. Further study with larger cohorts is warranted to better delineate complication rates in this population as well as to determine long-term outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-020-07831-xDOI Listing
July 2021

Comment on: Transversus abdominis plane block using a short-acting local anesthetic reduces pain and opioid consumption after laparoscopic bariatric surgery: a meta-analysis.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2020 09 28;16(9):1357-1358. Epub 2020 May 28.

College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2020.05.007DOI Listing
September 2020

American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery updated statement on single-anastomosis duodenal switch.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2020 07 30;16(7):825-830. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Division of Minimally Invasive and Bariatric Surgery, Penn State Health, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2020.03.020DOI Listing
July 2020

Current State of Bariatric Surgery: Procedures, Data, and Patient Management.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Tech Vasc Interv Radiol 2020 Mar 11;23(1):100654. Epub 2020 Jan 11.

Penn State Health Surgical Specialties, Hershey, PA. Electronic address:

Bariatric surgery comprises a group of operative procedures designed to improve weight-related medical conditions. In the United States, these include vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, and the duodenal switch procedure. Bariatric surgery is the only durable and effective way for most humans to lose a significant amount of weight, and see improvement in obesity-related comorbidities. It can improve quality of life, prevent a number of cancers, and decrease overall mortality. Bariatric procedures work through several avenues, including restriction of food intake, malabsorption of food calories, an increase in metabolic rate, decreased hunger, increased satiety, and a variety of other hormonal mechanisms. Several other surgical, endoscopic, and non-permanent approaches to weight loss will also be covered in this section.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tvir.2020.100654DOI Listing
March 2020

Joint international consensus statement for ending stigma of obesity.

Nat Med 2020 04 4;26(4):485-497. Epub 2020 Mar 4.

Obesity Action Coalition, Tampa, FL, USA.

People with obesity commonly face a pervasive, resilient form of social stigma. They are often subject to discrimination in the workplace as well as in educational and healthcare settings. Research indicates that weight stigma can cause physical and psychological harm, and that affected individuals are less likely to receive adequate care. For these reasons, weight stigma damages health, undermines human and social rights, and is unacceptable in modern societies. To inform healthcare professionals, policymakers, and the public about this issue, a multidisciplinary group of international experts, including representatives of scientific organizations, reviewed available evidence on the causes and harms of weight stigma and, using a modified Delphi process, developed a joint consensus statement with recommendations to eliminate weight bias. Academic institutions, professional organizations, media, public-health authorities, and governments should encourage education about weight stigma to facilitate a new public narrative about obesity, coherent with modern scientific knowledge.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0803-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7154011PMC
April 2020

Comment on: GIST identified during bariatric surgery: to treat or not to treat?

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2020 03 14;16(3):e17-e18. Epub 2019 Dec 14.

Department of Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2019.12.008DOI Listing
March 2020

Comment on: Impact of a preoperative low-calorie diet on liver histology in patients with fatty liver disease undergoing bariatric surgery.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2019 12 19;15(12):e33-e34. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2019.09.066DOI Listing
December 2019

Comment on: Bariatric surgery outcomes in patients on home oxygen therapy: an analysis of the MBSAQIP database.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2019 09 13;15(9):1580-1581. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2019.07.030DOI Listing
September 2019

Concomitant laparoscopic cholecystectomy and antegrade wire, rendezvous cannulation of the biliary tree may reduce post-ERCP pancreatitis events.

Surg Endosc 2020 07 5;34(7):3216-3222. Epub 2019 Sep 5.

Division of Minimally Invasive and Bariatric Surgery, Department of General Surgery, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, H149, Hershey, PA, 17033, USA.

Introduction: For patients with a gallbladder in situ, choledocholithiasis is a common presenting symptom. Both two-session endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and subsequent cholecystectomy (CCY) and single-stage (simultaneous CCY/ERCP) have been described. We utilize an antegrade wire, rendezvous cannulation (AWRC) technique to facilitate ERCP during CCY. We hypothesized that AWRC would eliminate episodes of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP).

Methods: An IRB approved, retrospective review of patients who underwent ERCP via AWRC for choledocholithiasis during CCY was performed. Patient characteristics, pre/postoperative laboratory values, complications, and readmissions were reviewed. AWRC was conducted during laparoscopic or open CCY for evidence of choledocholithiasis with or without preoperative biliary pancreatitis or cholangitis. Following confirmatory intraoperative cholangiogram, a flexible tip guidewire was inserted antegrade into the cystic ductotomy, through the bile duct across the ampulla and retrieved in the duodenum with a duodenoscope. Standard ERCP maneuvers to clear the bile duct are then performed over the wire.

Results: Thirty-seven patients (27 female, age 19-77, BMI 21-50 kg/m) underwent intraoperative ERCP via AWRC technique during CCY. Seventeen underwent CCY for acute cholecystitis. Fifteen patients underwent transgastric ERCP in the setting of previous Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Mean total operative time was 214 min. Mean ERCP time was 31 min. Thirty-three patients had biliary stents placed. There were no cannulations or injections of the pancreatic duct. There were no intraoperative complications associated with the ERCP and no patients developed PEP. Three patients developed a postoperative subhepatic abscess requiring drainage.

Conclusion: AWRC is a useful technique for safe and efficient bile duct cannulation for therapeutic ERCP in the setting of choledocholithiasis at the time of CCY. Despite supine (rather than the traditional prone) positioning, total ERCP times were short and we eliminated any manipulation of the pancreatic duct. No patients in our series developed PEP or post-sphincterotomy bleeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-019-07074-5DOI Listing
July 2020

Changes in Alcohol Use after Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery: Predictors and Mechanisms.

Curr Psychiatry Rep 2019 08 13;21(9):85. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

Massachusetts General Hospital Weight Center, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.

Purpose Of Review: This review synthesized the literature on predictors and mechanisms of post-bariatric alcohol problems, in order to guide future research on prevention and treatment targets.

Recent Findings: Consistent evidence suggests an elevated risk of developing problems with alcohol following bariatric surgery. While there is a paucity of empirical data on predictors of problematic alcohol use after bariatric surgery, being male, a younger age, smoking, regular alcohol consumption, pre-surgical alcohol use disorder, and a lower sense of belonging have predicted alcohol misuse post-operatively. This review synthesizes potential mechanisms including specific bariatric surgical procedures, peptides and reinforcement/reward pathways, pharmacokinetics, and genetic influences. Finally, potential misperceptions regarding mechanisms are explored. Certain bariatric procedures elevate the risk of alcohol misuse post-operatively. Future research should serve to elucidate the complexities of reward signaling, genetically mediated mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in relation to alcohol use across gender and developmental period by surgery type.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11920-019-1070-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7057935PMC
August 2019

ASMBS position statement on weight bias and stigma.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2019 Jun 10;15(6):814-821. Epub 2019 May 10.

The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2019.04.031DOI Listing
June 2019

Predictors of glycemic control after sleeve gastrectomy versus Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: A meta-analysis, meta-regression, and systematic review.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2019 01 2;15(1):e3-e4. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine Department of Surgery, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2018.10.025DOI Listing
January 2019

Prevalence and pathophysiology of early dumping in patients after primary Roux-en-Y gastric bypass during a mixed-meal tolerance test.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2019 01 30;15(1):82. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine Department of Surgery, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2018.10.019DOI Listing
January 2019

A double blind randomized placebo controlled pilot study of single-dose preoperative modafinil for functional recovery after general anesthesia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 Sep;97(39):e12585

Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.

Background: We theorized that modafinil, an atypical psychomotor stimulant, utilized to improve daytime somnolence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, would improve functional recovery after general anesthesia by improving time to extubation, post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) length of stay and subjective recovery after general anesthesia.

Methods: A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study was performed. 102 patients with the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were randomized to receive either 200 mg of modafinil or placebo before general anesthesia. The trial was terminated for futility. The primary outcome was PACU length of stay between groups. Secondary functional metrics of improved post-anesthesia recovery were compared between groups.

Results: No difference between groups was found on the primary outcome of PACU length of stay (PACULOS). Emergence from general anesthesia was not significantly different when assessed by the time period between termination of volatile anesthetic and extubation. Similarly, no difference between groups was found in intraoperative bispectral index (BIS) values, postoperative pain scores or narcotic consumption (morphine equivalent units). In the post-anesthesia care unit, respiratory rate was increased and mean arterial pressure was lower in the modafinil group.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the use of single-dose preoperative modafinil may not improve functional recovery after general anesthesia in patients with the diagnosis of OSA. Further research is needed before use of atypical psychomotor stimulants in this surgical population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000012585DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6181597PMC
September 2018

Comment on: histologic improvement of NAFLD in patients with obesity after bariatric surgery based on standardized NAS (NAFLD activity score).

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2018 10 15;14(10):1616-1617. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Department of Surgery, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2018.08.010DOI Listing
October 2018

American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and American Hernia Society consensus guideline on bariatric surgery and hernia surgery.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2018 Sep 19;14(9):1221-1232. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

Department of Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Electronic address:

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery issues the following guidelines for the purpose of enhancing quality of care in hernia treatment through metabolic and bariatric surgery. In this statement, suggestions for management are presented that are derived from available knowledge, peer-reviewed scientific literature, and expert opinion. This was accomplished by performing a review of currently available literature regarding obesity, obesity treatments, and hernia surgery. The intent of issuing such a guideline is to provide objective information regarding the impact of obesity treatment on effective and durable hernia repair. The guideline may be revised in the future should additional evidence become available.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2018.07.005DOI Listing
September 2018

Comment on: resolution of type 2 diabetes after sleeve gastrectomy: a two-step hypothesis.

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2018 04 2;14(4):e2-e3. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

Department of Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2018.01.023DOI Listing
April 2018

The impact of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2018 03 8;14(3):325-331. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania; Department of Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Background: Mental health disorders are common among bariatric surgery patients. Mental health disorders, particularly depression, have been associated with poorer surgical outcomes, indicating the bariatric surgery patient population warrants special clinical attention.

Objective: Our study sought to examine the effect of diagnosed mental health disorders on 30-day readmission for those undergoing bariatric surgery in hospitals across Pennsylvania from 2011 to 2014.

Methods: We used Pennsylvania Healthcare Cost Containment Council data to perform this analysis. Inclusion criteria encompassed patients aged>18 years who underwent bariatric surgery at any hospital or freestanding surgical facility in Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2014. Mental health disorders were identified using predetermined International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes. Logistic regression was used to model the risk of 30-day readmission and estimate the effect of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission.

Results: Of the 19,259 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, 40.3% had a diagnosed mental health disorder; 6.51% of all patients were readmitted within 30 days. Patients with a diagnosed mental health disorder had 34% greater odds of readmission (odds ratio = 1.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.19-1.51) relative to patients with no diagnosed mental health disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder had 46% greater odds of being readmitted compared with patients with no major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder diagnosis.

Conclusion: Study findings imply the need for risk assessment of patients before postoperative discharge. Given that patients with mental health diagnoses are at increased risk of 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery, they may benefit from additional discharge interventions designed to attenuate potential readmissions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2017.11.030DOI Listing
March 2018

American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery updated position statement on sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2017 10 22;13(10):1652-1657. Epub 2017 Aug 22.

Division of Minimally Invasive and Bariatric Surgery, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2017.08.007DOI Listing
October 2017

Comment on: Is a "retained fundus" seen on postoperative upper gastrointestinal series after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy predictive of inferior weight loss?

Authors:
Ann M Rogers

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2017 07 31;13(7):1151. Epub 2017 Mar 31.

Department of Surgery, College of Medicine The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2017.03.020DOI Listing
July 2017
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