Publications by authors named "Anke Bresch"

8 Publications

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The association between in vivo central noradrenaline transporter availability and trait impulsivity.

Psychiatry Res Neuroimaging 2017 Sep 23;267:9-14. Epub 2017 Jun 23.

Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) AdiposityDiseases, Leipzig University Medical Centre, Liebigstraße 20, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstraße 18, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

The brain noradrenaline (NA) system, particularly NA transporters (NAT), are thought to play an important role in modulating impulsive behavior. Impaired impulsivity is implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions; however, an in vivo link between central NAT availability and human impulsivity has not been shown. Using positron emission tomography (PET) and S,S-[C]O-methylreboxetine (MRB), we tested whether NAT availability is associated with this basic behavioral trait based on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) in twenty healthy individuals (12 females, 33.8±9.3, 21-52 years of age) with a body mass index (BMI) ranging from 21.7kg/m to 47.8kg/m. Applying both voxel-wise and volume-of-interest (VOI) based analyses, we found that distribution volume ratios (DVR) used as PET outcome measures negatively correlated with BIS-11 total scores in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and in the hippocampus as well as in parts of the cerebellar cortex. These associations however did not remain after correction for multiple testing. Thus, although it appears that low NAT availability is associated with greater scores of impaired behavioral control, this needs to be confirmed in a larger series of individuals with highly impulsive behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pscychresns.2017.06.013DOI Listing
September 2017

Test-retest measurements of dopamine D-type receptors using simultaneous PET/MRI imaging.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2017 Jun 14;44(6):1025-1032. Epub 2017 Feb 14.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 18, D-04103, Leipzig, Germany.

Purpose: The role of dopamine D-type receptor (DR)-expressing neurons in the regulation of motivated behavior and reward prediction has not yet been fully established. As a prerequisite for future research assessing D-mediated neuronal network regulation using simultaneous PET/MRI and DR-selective [C]SCH23390, this study investigated the stability of central DR measurements between two independent PET/MRI sessions under baseline conditions.

Methods: Thirteen healthy volunteers (7 female, age 33 ± 13 yrs) underwent 90-min emission scans, each after 90-s bolus injection of 486 ± 16 MBq [C]SCH23390, on two separate days within 2-4 weeks using a PET/MRI system. Parametric images of DR distribution volume ratio (DVR) and binding potential (BP) were generated by a multi-linear reference tissue model with two parameters and the cerebellar cortex as receptor-free reference region. Volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis was performed with manual VOIs drawn on consecutive transverse MRI slices for brain regions with high and low DR density.

Results: The DVR varied from 2.5 ± 0.3 to 2.9 ± 0.5 in regions with high DR density (e.g. the head of the caudate) and from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.2 in regions with low DR density (e.g. the prefrontal cortex). The absolute variability of the DVR ranged from 2.4% ± 1.3% to 5.1% ± 5.3%, while Bland-Altman analyses revealed very low differences in mean DVR (e.g. 0.013 ± 0.17 for the nucleus accumbens). Intraclass correlation (one-way, random) indicated very high agreement (0.93 in average) for both DVR and BP values. Accordingly, the absolute variability of BP ranged from 7.0% ± 4.7% to 12.5% ± 10.6%; however, there were regions with very low DR content, such as the occipital cortex, with higher mean variability.

Conclusion: The test-retest reliability of DR measurements in this study was very high. This was the case not only for DR-rich brain areas, but also for regions with low DR density. These results will provide a solid base for future joint PET/MRI data analyses in stimulation-dependent mapping of DR-containing neurons and their effects on projections in neuronal circuits that determine behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-017-3645-0DOI Listing
June 2017

Post-dexamethasone serum copeptin corresponds to HPA axis responsiveness in human obesity.

Psychoneuroendocrinology 2017 04 16;78:39-47. Epub 2017 Jan 16.

Department of Neurology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address:

Context: Increased activities of the arginine-vasopressin (AVP) system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis were shown to be associated with human obesity, but relationships between these systems in obesity remain unclear.

Objectives: To assess HPA axis responsiveness and its relation to serum concentrations of the AVP-surrogate copeptin in subjects with obesity (OB) in comparison to non-obesity controls (NOC).

Methods: In a cross-sectional monocentric study, thirty-nine OB (f/m 25/14; age 36.5±10.0years; body mass index, BMI, 41.5±4.7kg/m) were compared to twenty-two NOC (f/m 12/10; age 35.3±8.5years; BMI 23.1±2.4kg/m), matched for age and sex. All individuals underwent the combined dexamethasone/CRH test.

Main Outcome Measures: Plasma ACTH and cortisol curve indicators derived from the dex/CRH test (post-CRH concentrations 30min after 100μg CRH; maximum concentration, MAX; area-under-the-curve, AUC; ACTH/cortisol ratios). Copeptin was assessed in 1500h samples of the dex/CRH test (after 1.5mg of oral dexamethasone, prior to CRH administration).

Results: Copeptin serum concentrations were higher in OB (median [IQR]: OB 4.62 [2.60-5.88] vs. NOC 3.04 [2.52-4.29] pmol/l, P=0.04). Correspondingly, OB showed higher post-CRH cortisol concentrations (OB: 51.5 [25.9-159.3] vs. NOC: 28.6 [20.0-41.6] nmol/l, P=0.01) and a lower post-CRH ACTH/cortisol ratio (OB: 0.028 [0.016-0.053] vs. NOC: 0.048 [0.034-0.070] pmol/nmol, P<0.01). Serum copeptin was significantly associated with HPA responsiveness in OB (post-CRH ACTH: R=0.42, P<0.01), driven by OB men (post-CRH ACTH: R=0.76, P<0.01, post-CRH cortisol: R=0.64, P=0.02). All associations withstand adjustments for BMI and age.

Conclusions: The association between increased copeptin with ACTH and cortisol release suggests a potential mechanistic interaction of the AVP system with HPA activation in human obesity. The relation of copeptin and HPA responsiveness should be further validated in situations with pronounced HPA activation, such as depression or multiple sclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.01.004DOI Listing
April 2017

Central noradrenaline transporter availability in highly obese, non-depressed individuals.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2017 Jun 9;44(6):1056-1064. Epub 2017 Jan 9.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstraße 18, 04103, Leipzig, Germany.

Purpose: The brain noradrenaline (NA) system plays an important role in the central nervous control of energy balance and is thus implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity. The specific processes modulated by this neurotransmitter which lead to obesity and overeating are still a matter of debate.

Methods: We tested the hypothesis that in vivo NA transporter (NAT) availability is changed in obesity by using positron emission tomography (PET) and S,S-[C]O-methylreboxetine (MRB) in twenty subjects comprising ten highly obese (body mass index BMI > 35 kg/m), metabolically healthy, non-depressed individuals and ten non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m) healthy controls.

Results: Overall, we found no significant differences in binding potential (BP) values between obese and non-obese individuals in the investigated brain regions, including the NAT-rich thalamus (0.40 ± 0.14 vs. 0.41 ± 0.18; p = 0.84) though additional discriminant analysis correctly identified individual group affiliation based on regional BP in all but one (control) case. Furthermore, inter-regional correlation analyses indicated different BP patterns between both groups but this did not survive testing for multiple comparions.

Conclusions: Our data do not find an overall involvement of NAT changes in human obesity. However, preliminary secondary findings of distinct regional and associative patterns warrant further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-016-3590-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5538358PMC
June 2017

Effortful control as a dimension of temperament is negatively associated with prefrontal serotonin transporter availability in obese and non-obese individuals.

Eur J Neurosci 2016 10 29;44(7):2460-2466. Epub 2016 Aug 29.

Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig University Medical Centre, Leipzig, Germany.

There is evidence that temperamental factors are associated with obesity; however, the biological mechanism of such association remains elusive. We aimed to investigate a possible association between serotonin transmission and regulative temperament in obese and non-obese individuals by using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of serotonin transporters (SERT) and the Adult Temperament Questionnaire. Twenty-nine obese individuals with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m and 13 non-obese controls (BMI < 30 kg/m ) underwent PET with [ C]-labeled DASB (highly selective for SERT) and self-completed the Effortful Control (EC) scale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire-Short Form (ATQ). With the help of this questionnaire, we aimed to assess the capacity of self-regulation. Overall, for obese and non-obese individuals together, VOI-based (volume of interest) analysis showed significant negative correlations between SERT BP and ATQ-EC AC (Activation Control) subscale in several brain regions (all r ≤ -0.47). Obese and non-obese individuals separated showed equally strong positive, but non-significant correlations. The analysis did not reveal any significant correlations of SERT availability and ATQ-EC IC (Inhibitory Control) or ATQ-EC AtC (Attentional Control) subscale within and between the two groups. The results indicate that regulative temperament - particularly the capacity to mitigate negatively toned impulses and to resist inappropriate avoidance behavior - might be associated with the prefrontal serotonergic system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejn.13362DOI Listing
October 2016

Primary Intradural Extramedullary Spinal Melanoma in the Lower Thoracic Spine.

Case Rep Oncol Med 2016 5;2016:3815280. Epub 2016 Apr 5.

Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leipzig University, Liebigstrasse 20, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Unlabelled: Background Context. Up to date, only four cases of primary intradural extramedullary spinal cord melanoma (PIEM) have been reported. No previous reports have described a case of PIEM located in the lower thoracic spine with long-term follow-up. Purpose. Demonstrating an unusual, extremely rare case of melanoma manifestation. Study Design.

Case Report: Methods. We report a case of a 57-year-old female suffering from increasing lower extremity pain, left-sided paresis, and paraesthesia due to spinal cord compression caused by PIEM in the lower thoracic spine. Results. Extensive investigation excluded other possible primary melanoma sites and metastases. For spinal cord decompression, the tumor at level T12 was resected, yet incompletely. Adjuvant radiotherapy was administered two weeks after surgery. The patient was recurrence-free at 104 weeks after radiotherapy but presents with unchanged neurological symptoms. Conclusion. Primary intradural extramedullary melanoma (PIEM) is extremely rare and its clinical course is unpredictable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3815280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4835629PMC
April 2016

Central serotonin transporter availability in highly obese individuals compared with non-obese controls: A [(11)C] DASB positron emission tomography study.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2016 Jun 18;43(6):1096-104. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstraße 18, 04103, Leipzig, Germany.

Purpose: The role of the central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system in feeding has been extensively studied in animals with the 5-HT family of transporters (5-HTT) being identified as key molecules in the regulation of satiety and body weight. Aberrant 5-HT transmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human obesity by in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging techniques. However, results obtained thus far from studies of central 5-HTT availability have been inconsistent, which is thought to be brought about mainly by the low number of individuals with a high body mass index (BMI) previously used. The aim of this study was therefore to assess 5-HTT availability in the brains of highly obese otherwise healthy individuals compared with non-obese healthy controls.

Methods: We performed PET using the 5-HTT selective radiotracer [(11)C] DASB on 30 highly obese (BMI range between 35 and 55 kg/m(2)) and 15 age- and sex-matched non-obese volunteers (BMI range between 19 and 27 kg/m(2)) in a cross-sectional study design. The 5-HTT binding potential (BPND) was used as the outcome parameter.

Results: On a group level, there was no significant difference in 5-HTT BPND in various cortical and subcortical regions in individuals with the highest BMI compared with non-obese controls, while statistical models showed minor effects of age, sex, and the degree of depression on 5-HTT BPND.

Conclusion: The overall finding of a lack of significantly altered 5-HTT availability together with its high variance in obese individuals justifies the investigation of individual behavioral responses to external and internal cues which may further define distinct phenotypes and subgroups in human obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-015-3243-yDOI Listing
June 2016

Imaging of the brain serotonin transporters (SERT) with 18F-labelled fluoromethyl-McN5652 and PET in humans.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2012 Jun 17;39(6):1001-11. Epub 2012 Feb 17.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Purpose: [(11)C]DASB is currently the most frequently used highly selective radiotracer for visualization and quantification of central SERT. Its use, however, is hampered by the short half-life of (11)C, the moderate cortical test-retest reliability, and the lack of quantifying endogenous serotonin. Labelling with (18)F allows in principle longer acquisition times for kinetic analysis in brain tissue and may provide higher sensitivity. The aim of our study was to firstly use the new highly SERT-selective (18)F-labelled fluoromethyl analogue of (+)-McN5652 ((+)-[(18)F]FMe-McN5652) in humans and to evaluate its potential for SERT quantification.

Methods: The PET data from five healthy volunteers (three men, two women, age 39 ± 10 years) coregistered with individual MRI scans were semiquantitatively assessed by volume-of-interest analysis using the software package PMOD. Rate constants and total distribution volumes (V (T)) were calculated using a two-tissue compartment model and arterial input function measurements were corrected for metabolite/plasma data. Standardized uptake region-to-cerebellum ratios as a measure of specific radiotracer accumulation were compared with those of a [(11)C]DASB PET dataset from 21 healthy subjects (10 men, 11 women, age 38 ± 8 years).

Results: The two-tissue compartment model provided adequate fits to the data. Estimates of total distribution volume (V (T)) demonstrated good identifiability based on the coefficients of variation (COV) for the volumes of interest in SERT-rich and cortical areas (COV V (T) <10%). Compared with [(11)C]DASB PET, there was a tendency to lower mean uptake values in (+)-[(18)F]FMe-McN5652 PET; however, the standard deviation was also somewhat lower. Altogether, cerebral (+)-[(18)F]FMe-McN5652 uptake corresponded well with the known SERT distribution in humans.

Conclusion: The results showed that (+)-[(18)F]FMe-McN5652 is also suitable for in vivo quantification of SERT with PET. Because of the long half-life of (18)F, the widespread use within a satellite concept seems feasible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-012-2078-zDOI Listing
June 2012