Publications by authors named "Anjileen K Singh"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Improving generalization of peer socialization gains in inclusive school settings using initiations training.

Behav Modif 2012 May 29;36(3):361-77. Epub 2012 May 29.

University of California, Santa Barbara, 93106-9490, USA.

Social engagement by children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in unstructured school settings generally occurs at very low levels, if at all. Although many interventions improve peer socialization, generalization and maintenance of such gains when interventions are faded are typically low. The present study employed a multiple baseline design across participants to target generalization in the absence of interventionists in elementary school children with ASD at recess. Teaching initiations has been suggested as one method to increase generalization. The results of the present study showed that when initiations were targeted during intervention for social play, the participants demonstrated generalized peer social engagement, increases in unprompted peer-directed initiations, and more positive affect during peer interactions. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical and applied implications of incorporating initiations training into social interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0145445512445609DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3761387PMC
May 2012

Improving motivation for academics in children with autism.

J Autism Dev Disord 2010 Sep;40(9):1057-66

Counseling/Clinical/School Psychology Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490, USA.

Many children with autism show very little interest in academic assignments and exhibit disruptive behavior when assignments are presented. Research indicates that incorporating specific motivational variables such as choice, interspersal of maintenance tasks, and natural reinforcers during intervention leads to improvements in core symptoms of autism and may possibly be effective in academic areas. Using a multiple baseline across children and behaviors design with four pre- and elementary school children with autism, we assessed whether the above variables could be incorporated into academic tasks to improve performance and interest. Results indicated that the intervention decreased the children's latency to begin academic tasks, improved their rate of performance and interest, and decreased their disruptive behavior. Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-010-0962-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2926912PMC
September 2010