Publications by authors named "Anita Badbaran"

34 Publications

Post-Transplantation Day +100 Minimal Residual Disease Detection Rather Than Mixed Chimerism Predicts Relapses after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Intermediate-Risk Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Undergoing Transplantation in Complete Remission.

Transplant Cell Ther 2022 Apr 13. Epub 2022 Apr 13.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Chimerism and minimal residual disease (MRD) are suggested to be prognostic for post-transplantation relapse in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Nevertheless, the predictive value of both approaches in homogeneous populations remains underinvestigated. Here we suggest that MRD may have greater predictive value for relapse than mixed chimerism (MC) in intermediate-risk AML patients. Seventy-nine patients with intermediate-risk AML (40 males; median age, 57 years [range, 19 to 77 years]) were included. MRD detection on day +100 was performed in bone marrow via multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for patients with an NPM1 mutation. Chimerism analysis was performed in peripheral blood. MC was defined as the persistence of <99.9% of donor alleles. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was highest for qPCR-MRD (.93), followed by MFC-MRD (.80) and MC (.65). The highest rate of relapse at 3 years was observed in day +100 qPCR-MRD-positive patients (100%), followed by MFC-MRD-positive patients (55%; P < .001). No patients with MC and without detectable MRD experienced relapse. The median 3-year overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) for patients with MC without detectable MRD were both 86% (range, 61% to 96%), significantly higher than the values in day +100 MFC-MRD-positive patients (OS, 61% [range, 36% to 84%]; LFS: 30% [range, 11% to 59%]) and with day +100 qPCR-MRD-positive patients (OS: 17% [range, 3% to 56%], P = .001; LFS: 0%, P < .001). In patients with intermediate-risk AML, the qPCR-MRD on day +100 was highly predictive for relapse and long-term survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, followed closely by MFC-MRD. In contrast, chimerism status had limited predictive potential. Thus, molecular and flow cytometry MRD monitoring rather than MC in the first several months post-transplantation can identify patients at increased risk of relapse who may benefit from early post-transplantation preemptive intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtct.2022.04.009DOI Listing
April 2022

Comparison of single copy gene‑based duplex quantitative PCR and digital droplet PCR for monitoring of expansion of CD19‑directed CAR T cells in treated patients.

Int J Oncol 2022 May 16;60(5). Epub 2022 Mar 16.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Centre Hamburg‑Eppendorf, D‑20246 Hamburg, Germany.

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy with axicabtagene ciloleucel, tisagenlecleucel and brexucabtagen ciloleucel has been adopted as the standard of care for patients with refractory and/or relapsed CD19‑positive lymphoid malignancies. Monitoring of kinetics of CAR T cells after administration is crucial for patient follow‑up and important to guide clinical decisions for patients subjected to CAR T cell therapy. Information of transgene copies within a CAR T cell product prior to administration, i.e. vector copy numbers, is of high importance to warrant patient safety. However, experimental assays for quantitative CAR T cell monitoring in the open domain are currently lacking. Several institutions have established in‑house assays to monitor CAR T cell frequencies. In the present study, the quantitative (q)PCR assay established at the Heidelberg University Hospital (Heidelberg, Germany), i.e. single copy gene‑based duplex qPCR, was compared with the digital droplet PCR assay established at the University Medical Center Hamburg‑Eppendorf (Hamburg, Germany). Both methods that were independently developed enable accurate and comparable CAR T cell frequency assessment and are useful in the clinical setting.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2022.5338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8973917PMC
May 2022

Post-Transplantation Multicolored Flow Cytometry-Minimal Residual Disease Status on Day 100 Predicts Outcomes for Patients With Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Transplant Cell Ther 2022 May 20;28(5):267.e1-267.e7. Epub 2022 Jan 20.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a dismal prognosis. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) provides a curative approach; however, the overall survival (OS) remains low (20% to 40%). In this setting, although some effective approaches have been evaluated in recent years, the management of such patients still remains challenging. In this study we evaluated the predictive role of post-transplant day 100 minimal residual disease (MRD) detection for post-transplantation outcomes for patients with refractory AML. Fifty-six adult patients with refractory AML (median age 58, range 20-76; male, 61%) who underwent allo-SCT were included in this retrospective monocentric study. Twenty-nine patients (52%) received fludarabine, amsacrine, and cytarabine (FLAMSA)-based conditioning. MRD was assessed using multicolored flow cytometry (MFC) according to European Leukemia Net guidelines ("different from normal" and leukemia-associated phenotype). The sensitivity of the method was 10 to 10. The median marrow blast count at allo-SCT was 25% (range 6% to 91%). At day 100 after transplantation, 40 patients (71%) experienced MFC-MRD negativity, and 16 patients (29%) were MRD positive. All included patients survived at least 100 days after transplantation without relapse. Univariate and multivariate analysis based on Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards method were performed. The median follow-up was 16 months (range 3 to 66). The post-transplantation day 100 MRD-negative patients instead received 2 allografts (27% versus 6%, P = .08). In multivariate analysis, day 100 MRD status (negative versus positive) (OS: 0.23 [0.1 to 0.54], P =0.001; relapses: 0.20 [0.1 to 0.49], P = .0005) and FLAMSA versus other regimens (0.34 [0.1 to 0.83], P = .018; relapses: 0.43 [0.17 to 1.1], P = .07) independently impacted post-transplantation survival. We suggest that post-transplantation day 100 MFC-MRD detection plays predictive role in refractory AML patients and may help to define possible candidates for early post-transplantation interventions aiming to decrease the relapse risk and improve survival.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtct.2022.01.014DOI Listing
May 2022

Reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for accelerated-phase myelofibrosis.

Blood Adv 2022 02;6(4):1222-1231

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Accelerated-phase myelofibrosis, currently defined by circulating blasts 10% to 19%, usually confers very high risk for progression and poor outcome. The outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for accelerated-phase myelofibrosis has not been evaluated yet. We analyzed the outcome of 349 clinically and genetically annotated patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis undergoing reduced intensity transplantation, of whom 35 had accelerated-phase myelofibrosis. In comparison with chronic-phase (<10% blasts) myelofibrosis, median leukocyte counts were higher, more patients had constitutional symptoms, and RAS mutations were detected more frequently in the accelerated-phase group. After a median follow-up of 5.9 years, estimated 5-year overall survival was 65% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49% to 81%) vs 64% (95% CI, 59% to 69%) for the chronic-phase group (P = .91), and median overall survival was not reached. In terms of relapse-free survival, estimated 5-year outcome for the accelerated-phase group was 49% (95% CI, 32% to 67%) vs 55% (95% CI, 50% to 61%) for the chronic-phase group (P = .65). Estimated 5-year nonrelapse mortality was 20% (95% CI, 8% to 33%) for the accelerated-phase group vs 30% (95% CI, 24% to 35%; P = .25) for the chronic-phase group. In terms of relapse, 5-year incidence was 30% (95% CI, 14% to 46%) for the accelerated-phase group vs 15% (95% CI, 11% to 19%) for the chronic-phase group (P = .02). Results were confirmed in multivariable analysis and propensity score matching. In conclusion, reduced intensity transplantation showed excellent survival but higher relapse for accelerated-phase myelofibrosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2021006827DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8864646PMC
February 2022

Digital PCR to quantify ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 copies in blood and tissues.

Mol Ther Methods Clin Dev 2021 Dec 16;23:418-423. Epub 2021 Oct 16.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.

Vaccination with the adenoviral-vector-based AstraZeneca ChAdOx1 nCov-19 (Vaxzevria) vaccine is efficient and safe. However, in rare cases vaccinated individuals developed life-threatening thrombotic complications, including thrombosis in cerebral sinus and splanchnic veins. Monitoring of the applied vector represents an important precondition to study the molecular mechanisms underlying vaccine-driven adverse effects now referred to as vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT). We previously have shown that digital PCR (dPCR) is an excellent tool to quantify transgene copies . Here, we present a highly sensitive dPCR for quantification of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 copies. Using this method, we quantified vector copies in human plasma 24, 72, and 168 h post vaccination and in a variety of murine tissues in an experimental vaccination model 30 min post injection. We describe a method for high-sensitivity quantitative detection of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 with possible implications to elucidate the mechanisms of severe ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccine complications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.omtm.2021.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8566940PMC
December 2021

Enhanced Immune Reconstitution of γδ T Cells after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Overcomes the Negative Impact of Pretransplantation Minimal Residual Disease-Positive Status in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

Transplant Cell Ther 2021 10 9;27(10):841-850. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Minimal/measurable residual disease (MRD) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a poor risk factor for outcome. γδ T cells represent a unique minority lymphocyte population that is preferentially located in peripheral tissues, can recognize antigens in a non-MHC-restricted manner, and plays a "bridging" role between the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this study, we investigated a potential graft-versus-leukemia effect of γδ T cell reconstitution post-transplantation in AML patients with pretransplantation positive MRD status (MRD). MRD assessment was performed in 202 patients using multicolored flow cytometry ("different from normal" strategy); 100 patients were deemed MRD. Analysis for absolute concentrations of CD3, CD4+, CD8, natural killer, and γδ T cells were performed by flow cytometry according to an internal protocol at day +30 and +100 post-transplantation. Differences between categorical and continuous variables were determined using the chi-square and Student t test, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare medians of continuous variables. Spearman's correlation was used for nonparametric assessment of correlation between different cell subsets during immune reconstitution. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to investigate the associations between immune reconstitution and survival outcomes. Gray's analysis was used to compute incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The median follow-up of survivors was 28 months (range 3 to 59 months). Younger age (≤58 years) of recipient and donor (<30 years), sex mismatch, use of a matched donor, cytomegalovirus reactivation, and administration of antithymocyte globulin were associated with a faster γδ T cell reconstitution. In multivariable analysis for MRD patients, a higher than median level of γδ T cells on days +30 and +100 resulted in significantly improved leukemia-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.42 [P = .007] and 0.42 [P = .011], respectively) and overall survival (HR, 0.44 [P = .038] and 0.33 [P = .009], respectively). Furthermore, a higher γδ T cell level on day +30 was associated with a significantly reduced risk of relapse (HR, 0.36; P = .019). No impact of γδ T cell level on relapse at days +30 and +100 could be seen in MRD-negative patients, and no correlation with occurrence of GVHD was observed. Our data indicate that enhanced immune reconstitution of γδ T cells post-transplantation may overcome the higher relapse risk of pretransplantation MRD status in patients with AML.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtct.2021.06.003DOI Listing
October 2021

Axicabtagene ciloleucel in vivo expansion and treatment outcome in aggressive B-cell lymphoma in a real-world setting.

Blood Adv 2021 06;5(11):2523-2527

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation.

Data on the association between chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell kinetics and patient outcome in the nontrial setting are missing, mainly due to the lack of broadly available CAR-T-cell diagnostic quantification tools. We performed prospective quantification of axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) in 21 patients treated for aggressive B-cell lymphoma at our clinic. Median peak CAR-T-cell count was 16.14 CAR-T cells/µL. Patients with 16.14/μL or higher peak CAR-T cells (strong expanders) had more day-30 objective responses (91% vs 40%, P = .02). In univariate analysis, peak CAR-T cell ≥ 16.14 (P < .001), normal platelet counts at start of lymphodepletion (P < .001), no prior stem cell transplant (P = .04), and peak CAR-T cells as continuous variable (P = .03) were associated with better progression-free survival (PFS). After adjusting for platelet counts and prior stem cell transplantation, peak CAR-T cells below median was still associated with shorter PFS (relative risk, 0.15, 95% confidence interval, 0.04-0.59, P = .007). Low platelet counts also maintained significant impact on PFS. Our data demonstrate association of axi-cel levels and outcome in a nontrial setting and for the first time use a cutoff to segregate weak and strong expanders with respective outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020003959DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8238487PMC
June 2021

A prognostic score including mutation profile and clinical features for patients with CMML undergoing stem cell transplantation.

Blood Adv 2021 03;5(6):1760-1769

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

The inclusion of mutation status improved risk stratification for newly diagnosed patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Stem cell transplantation is a potentially curative treatment option, and patient selection is critical because of relevant transplant-related morbidity and mortality. We aimed to evaluate the impact of mutation status together with clinical presentations on posttransplant outcome. Our study included 240 patients with a median follow-up of 5.5 years. A significant association with worse survival was identified for the presence of mutations in ASXL1 and/or NRAS. In multivariable analysis, ASXL1- and/or NRAS-mutated genotype (hazard ratio [HR], 1.63), marrow blasts >2% (HR, 1.70), and increasing comorbidity index (continuous HR, 1.16) were independently associated with worse survival. A prognostic score (CMML transplant score) was developed, and the following points were assigned: 4 points for an ASXL1- and/or NRAS-mutated genotype or blasts >2% and 1 point each for an increase of 1 in the comorbidity index. The CMML transplant score (range, 0-20) was predictive of survival and nonrelapse mortality (P < .001 for both). Up to 5 risk groups were identified, showing 5-year survival of 81% for a score of 0 to 1, 49% for a score of 2 to 4, 43% for a score of 5 to 7, 31% for a score of 8 to 10, and 19% for a score >10. The score retained performance after validation (concordance index, 0.68) and good accuracy after calibration. Predictions were superior compared with existing scores designed for the nontransplant setting, which resulted in significant risk reclassification. This CMML transplant score, which incorporated mutation and clinical information, was prognostic in patients specifically undergoing transplantation and may facilitate personalized counseling.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020003600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7993107PMC
March 2021

Role of pre-transplant MRD level detected by flow cytometry in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation with AML.

Eur J Haematol 2021 May 15;106(5):606-615. Epub 2021 Feb 15.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Eppendorf, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.

Objectives And Methods: We analyzed the impact of pretransplant MRD level in bone marrow measured by flow cytometry using "different from normal" method on outcomes for 189 AML patients (108 males; median age, 58 (21-80) years). All patients were subdivided into negative (n = 96), "low" (0.1%-0.5%, n = 32), and "high" MRD (>0.5%, n = 61) groups.

Results: In multivariate analysis, the hazard ratios for "high" and "low" MRD levels related to MRD negativity were 7.9 (95% CI 3.5-18.1, P < .001) and 5.4 (95% CI 2.1-14, P = .0058) for relapse; 2.3 (95% CI 1.3-4.1, P = .006) and 1.6 (95% CI 0.82-3.3, P = .16) for OS; and 2.8 (95% CI 1.7-4.7, P < .001) and 2.2 (95% CI 1.1-4.2, P = .02) for LFS, respectively. We found no significant impact of "low" MRD level on relapses (0.68, 95% CI 0.33-1.4, P = .30), OS (0.72, 95% CI: 0.36-1.5, P = .36) and LFS (0.79, 95% CI: 0.42-1.5, P = .46) related to "high" MRD group.

Conclusions: Presence of detectable MRD was indicative for a high relapse risk, low LFS and OS. "Low" MRD level showed no significant impact on relapse, LFS and OS related to "high" MRD group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13557DOI Listing
May 2021

Accurate In-Vivo Quantification of CD19 CAR-T Cells after Treatment with Axicabtagene Ciloleucel (Axi-Cel) and Tisagenlecleucel (Tisa-Cel) Using Digital PCR.

Cancers (Basel) 2020 Jul 20;12(7). Epub 2020 Jul 20.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Centre (UMC) Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.

Immunotherapy with CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-) T cells has shown excellent efficacy in relapsed/refractory B-cell cancers. The in vivo expansion and persistence of CAR-T cells after infusion are important response- and toxicity-determining variables, but diagnostic tools are largely missing. We showed previously for axi-cel that digital PCR (dPCR) is excellently suited to monitoring CAR-T cells in vivo. Here, we aimed to develop an analogous dPCR assay for tisa-cel. To do so, we cloned and sequenced the CAR construct from the lentiviral tisa-cel vector and designed primers and Black hole quencher (BHQ) probes complimentary to sequences present in the FMC63 scFv part of axi-cel (assay A), tisa-cel (T), and both constructs (U = "universal"). In conjunction with excellent specificity, all assays have a detection limit of one single CAR copy, corresponding to a sensitivity of approximately 1 in 5000 cells (0.02%) for 100 ng genomic DNA (for one vector copy per transduced cell). The new universal assay was first validated using patient samples previously quantified with the axi-cel-specific dPCR and thereafter applied to quantify and monitor adoptively transferred axi-cel and tisa-cel T cells in post-infusion samples (peripheral blood, bone marrow, liquor, and ascites). Actual CAR-T counts per µl were calculated, taking into account vector copy and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) numbers, and showed very good correlation with flow cytometry results. We conclude that our novel dPCR assay is optimally suited to monitoring tisa-cel and axi-cel CAR-T cells in real-time in various body fluids.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071970DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7409173PMC
July 2020

Clonal Evolution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The Case of Myelofibrosis.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2020 07 5;26(7):e167-e170. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

The significance of clonal evolution in myelofibrosis (MF) relapse remains poorly understood. Here we performed panel sequencing in paired samples of 30 patients with MF who relapsed after undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). We identified a median of 2 mutations (range, 0 to 12) in a median of 2 genes (range, 0 to 8) before allo-SCT, along with a median of 2 mutations (range, 0 to 12) in 2 genes (range, 0 to 6) at relapse. Additional whole-genome sequencing (n = 6) did not elucidate additional molecular changes. Taken together, our data provide further evidence, here on MF, that clonal evolution after alloSCT is limited and that instead, alloSCT selects specific (sub)clones.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.02.021DOI Listing
July 2020

Digital PCR Assays for Precise Quantification of CD19-CAR-T Cells after Treatment with Axicabtagene Ciloleucel.

Mol Ther Methods Clin Dev 2020 Mar 15;16:172-178. Epub 2020 Jan 15.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Treatment with axicabtagene ciloleucel (Axi-cel) CD19-CAR-T (chimeric antigen receptor T) cells has been approved for refractory/relapsed diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMBCL). Because treatment success as well as side effects might depend on CAR-T cell expansion , we aimed at developing digital PCR (dPCR) assays for detection and quantification of CAR-T cells. To this end, we cloned and sequenced the complete cDNA of the CAR construct. We designed different combinations of primers and dual-labeled hydrolysis probes located in various CAR regions. Three combinations were successfully tested on CAR-positive and -negative cells in duplex reactions with a reference gene (REF) to concomitantly assess cell numbers. All assays demonstrated excellent specificity and reproducibility with neglectable inter-assay variations. For all three assays, almost perfect correlation between the two dPCRs (Axi-cel versus REF) was observed, and the limit of detection was one single CAR-transduced cell corresponding to a sensitivity of 0.01% for 100 ng genomic DNA. After cross-validation, we used one assay to monitor Axi-cel CAR-T numbers in patients. CAR-T expansion and contraction followed the expected kinetics with median peak value of 11.2 Axi-cel CAR-T cells/μL at 11.3 days (median). Clinically, we observed only two partial responses (PRs) in the five patients with CAR-T cell peak numbers below median, whereas four of the five patients with comparatively good expansion showed clinical responses (two complete responses [CRs] and two PRs) on day 30. In conclusion, we established a novel dPCR assay for the sensitive detection of transgenic CAR-T cells, which should be very useful in the context of Axi-cel treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.omtm.2019.12.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7005515PMC
March 2020

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelofibrosis harboring the MPL mutation.

Eur J Haematol 2019 Dec 16;103(6):552-557. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Introduction: Primary and post-ET/PV myelofibrosis are myeloproliferative neoplasms harboring in most cases driving mutations in JAK2, CALR or MPL, and a variable number of additional mutations in other genes. Molecular analysis represents a powerful tool to guide prognosis and clinical management. Only about 10% of patients with myelofibrosis harbor alterations in MPL gene. No data are available about the transplantation outcome in the specific MPL-mutated group.

Patients: We collected the data of 18 myelofibrosis patients(primary: 14; post-ET: 4) transplanted in 4 EBMT centers (Hamburg, Paris, Essen, and Hannover) between 2005 and 2016.

Results: Before the transplant, we explored the molecular profile by NGS and reported the frequency of mutations occurring in a panel of genes including JAK2, MPL, CALR, U2AF1, SRSF2, SF3B1, ASXL1, IDH1, IDH2, CBL, DNMT3A, TET2, EZH2, TP53, IKZF1, NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, SH2B3, and RUNX1. The 1-year transplant-related mortality was 16.5%, 5-years overall survival and 5-y relapse-free survival 83.5%. The only relapse occurred in a patient who harbored mutations in both ASXL1 and EZH2 genes.

Conclusion: These retrospective data suggest that MPL-mutated myelofibrosis patients have a favorable outcome after allogeneic transplantation with very low rate of disease relapse (5.5%) in comparison with the available historical controls regarding myelofibrosis in all.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13318DOI Listing
December 2019

Reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation for younger patients with myelofibrosis.

Br J Haematol 2019 08 15;186(3):484-489. Epub 2019 May 15.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is a curative procedure for myelofibrosis. Elderly people are mainly affected, limiting the feasibility of myeloablative regimens. The introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) made alloSCT feasible for older patients. Nevertheless, the incidence of myelofibrosis is not negligible in young patients, who are theoretically able to tolerate high-intensity therapy. Very few data are available about the efficacy of RIC-alloSCT in younger myelofibrosis patients. This study included 56 transplanted patients aged <55 years. Only 30% had a human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donor, the others were transplanted from a fully-matched (36%) or partially-matched (34%) unrelated donor. All transplants were conditioned according the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation protocol: busulfan-fludarabine + anti-thymocyte globulin, followed by ciclosporin and mycophenolate. One patient experienced primary graft failure. Incidence of graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was 44% (grade III/IV 23%). One-year non-relapse mortality was 7% and the 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 19%. After a median follow-up of 8·6 years, the estimated 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) was 68% and 82%, respectively. Patients with fully-matched donor had a 5-year OS of 92%, in contrast to 68% for those with a mismatched donor (P = 0·03). The most important outcome-determining factor is donor HLA-matching. In conclusion, RIC-alloSCT ensures optimal engraftment and low relapse rate in younger myelofibrosis patients, enabling the possibility of cure in this group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15952DOI Listing
August 2019

Comprehensive clinical-molecular transplant scoring system for myelofibrosis undergoing stem cell transplantation.

Blood 2019 05 13;133(20):2233-2242. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative in myelofibrosis, and current prognostic scoring systems aim to select patients for transplantation. Here, we aimed to develop a prognostic score to determine prognosis after transplantation itself, using clinical, molecular, and transplant-specific information from a total of 361 patients with myelofibrosis. Of these, 205 patients were used as a training cohort to create a clinical-molecular myelofibrosis transplant scoring system (MTSS), which was then externally validated in a cohort of 156 patients. Multivariable analysis on survival identified age at least 57 years, Karnofsky performance status lower than 90%, platelet count lower than 150 × 10/L, leukocyte count higher than 25 × 10/L before transplantation, HLA-mismatched unrelated donor, mutation, and non-/ driver mutation genotype being independent predictors of outcome. The uncorrected concordance index for the final survival model was 0.723, and bias-corrected indices were similar. Risk factors were incorporated into a 4-level MTSS: low (score, 0-2), intermediate (score, 3-4), high (score, 5), and very high (score, >5). The 5-year survival according to risk groups in the validation cohort was 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 71%-95%), 64% (95% CI, 53%-75%), 37% (95% CI, 17%-57%), and 22% (95% CI, 4%-39%), respectively ( < .001). Increasing score was predictive of nonrelapse mortality ( < .001) and remained applicable to primary (0.718) and post-essential thrombocythemia (ET)/polycythemia vera (PV) myelofibrosis (0.701) improving prognostic ability in comparison with all currently available disease-specific systems. In conclusion, this MTSS predicts outcome of patients with primary and post-ET/PV myelofibrosis undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2018-12-890889DOI Listing
May 2019

Peritransplantation Ruxolitinib Prevents Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease in Patients with Myelofibrosis Undergoing Allogenic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2018 10 22;24(10):2152-2156. Epub 2018 May 22.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

JAK inhibition by ruxolitinib is approved for treating myelofibrosis and also has shown efficacy in treating steroid-resistant acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In 12 patients with myelofibrosis (median age, 63 years; range, 43 to 71 years) who were treated with ruxolitinib and underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT), ruxolitinib was continued (2 × 5 mg daily) until stable engraftment. No graft failure was observed, and leukocyte engraftment was achieved after a median of 12 days (range, 11 to 18 days). One patient developed fever of unknown origin after discontinuation of ruxolitinib; otherwise, no withdrawal syndrome was observed. Overall, only 1 patient each experienced acute GVHD grade I or II, resulting in an 8% incidence of acute GVHD grade II-IV at day +100, with no nonrelapse mortality. Complete chimerism was achieved in 11 patients after a median of 40 days, and molecular clearance of the underlying driver mutation was noted in 10 patients after a median of 32 days. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation occurred in 5 patients (41%), 1 of whom had CMV colitis as well, but all resolved after ganciclovir treatment. In 2 patients, ruxolitinib had to be discontinued on day 17 and day 18 after ASCT due to cytopenia after engraftment. Levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-8, IL-10, IL-6, TNFR2, INF-α, and INF-β were reduced after ruxolitinib treatment. After day +100, 4 patients developed acute GVHD (1 with grade I, 2 with grade II, and 1 with grade III) after tapering of cyclosporine, and all patients were alive at a median follow-up of 17 months (range, 12 to 18 months).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.05.023DOI Listing
October 2018

Impact of ruxolitinib pretreatment on outcomes after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelofibrosis.

Eur J Haematol 2018 Sep 4;101(3):305-317. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Introduction: Ruxolitinib is the first approved drug for treatment of myelofibrosis, but its impact of outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is unknown.

Patients And Methods: We reported on 159 myelofibrosis patients (pts) with a median age of 59 years (r: 28-74) who received reduced intensity ASCT between 2000 and 2015 in eight German centers from related (n = 23), matched (n = 86) or mismatched (n = 50) unrelated donors. Forty-six (29%) patients received ruxolitinib at any time point prior to ASCT. The median daily dose of ruxolitinib was 30 mg (range 10-40 mg) and the median duration of treatment was 4.9 months (range 0.4-39.1 months).

Results: Primary graft failure was seen in 2 pts (4%) in the ruxolitinib and 3 (2%) in the non-ruxolitinib group. Engraftment and incidence of acute GVHD grade II to IV and III/IV did not differ between groups (37% vs 39% and 19% vs 28%, respectively), nor did the non-relapse mortality at 2 years (23% vs 23%). A trend for lower risk of relapse was seen in the ruxolitinib group (9% vs 17%, P = .2), resulting in a similar 2 year DFS and OS (68% vs 60% and 73% vs 70%, respectively). No difference in any outcome variable could be seen between ruxolitinib responders and those who failed or lost response to ruxolitinib.

Conclusions: These results suggest that ruxolitinib pretreatment in myelofibrosis patient does not negatively influence outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13099DOI Listing
September 2018

Impact of Molecular Genetics on Outcome in Myelofibrosis Patients after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Jul 4;23(7):1095-1101. Epub 2017 Apr 4.

Department of Hematology, Hemostasis, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Molecular genetics may influence outcome for patients with myelofibrosis. To determine the impact of molecular genetics on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, we screened 169 patients with primary myelofibrosis (n = 110), post-essential thrombocythemia/polycythemia vera myelofibrosis (n = 46), and myelofibrosis in transformation (n = 13) for mutations in 16 frequently mutated genes. The most frequent mutation was JAK2V617F (n = 101), followed by ASXL1 (n = 49), calreticulin (n = 34), SRSF2 (n = 16), TET2 (n = 10), U2AF1 (n = 11), EZH2 (n = 7), MPL (n = 6), IDH2 (n = 5), IDH1 (n = 4), and CBL (n = 1). The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year was 21% and of relapse at 5 years 25%. The 5-year rates progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were and 56%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis CALR mutation was an independent factor for lower NRM (HR, .415; P = .05), improved PFS (HR, .393; P = .01), and OS (HR, .448; P = .03). ASXL1 and IDH2 mutations were independent risk factors for lower PFS (HR, 1.53 [P = .008], and HR, 5.451 [P = .002], respectively), whereas no impact was observed for "triple negative" patients. Molecular genetics, especially CALR, IDH2, and ASXL1 mutations, may thus be useful to predict outcome independently from known clinical risk factors after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.03.034DOI Listing
July 2017

Indication of Horizontal DNA Gene Transfer by Extracellular Vesicles.

PLoS One 2016;11(9):e0163665. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

Research Department Cell and Gene Therapy, Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

The biological relevance of extracellular vesicles (EV) in intercellular communication has been well established. Thus far, proteins and RNA were described as main cargo. Here, we show that EV released from human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-hMSC) also carry high-molecular DNA in addition. Extensive EV characterization revealed this DNA mainly associated with the outer EV membrane and to a smaller degree also inside the EV. Our EV purification protocol secured that DNA is not derived from apoptotic or necrotic cells. To analyze the relevance of EV-associated DNA we lentivirally transduced Arabidopsis thaliana-DNA (A.t.-DNA) as indicator into BM-hMSC and generated EV. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) techniques we detected high copy numbers of A.t.-DNA in EV. In recipient hMSC incubated with tagged EV for two weeks we identified A.t.-DNA transferred to recipient cells. Investigation of recipient cell DNA using quantitative PCR and verification of PCR-products by sequencing suggested stable integration of A.t.-DNA. In conclusion, for the first time our proof-of-principle experiments point to horizontal DNA transfer into recipient cells via EV. Based on our results we assume that eukaryotic cells are able to exchange genetic information in form of DNA extending the known cargo of EV by genomic DNA. This mechanism might be of relevance in cancer but also during cell evolution and development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0163665PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5042424PMC
September 2016

Correlation of somatic mutations with outcome after FLAMSA-busulfan sequential conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

Eur J Haematol 2016 Sep 15;97(3):288-96. Epub 2016 Feb 15.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a curative treatment option for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Little is known about the prognostic impact of mutations, for example, in TP53 specifically after allo-HSCT. We here describe the prognostic impact of mutations in a panel of 19 genes analyzed by amplicon-based next-generation-sequencing in a uniformly treated patient cohort. Sixty-two patients with a median age of 61 yr suffered from MDS with 0-20% bone marrow blasts. International Prognostic Score was intermediate 1 (15%) and higher (79%). Conditioning uniformly was performed using a sequential approach in which FLAMSA chemotherapy was followed by Busulfan-based conditioning. Patients mostly were transplanted from an unrelated donor (77%), and 36% of patients received a graft from a mismatched donor. Median number of mutations was 2 (range 0-6). RUNX1, GATA2, TET2, and CEBPA were the genes most frequently found mutated. TP53, a factor previously reported to confer adverse prognostic impact after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, was mutated in samples from eight patients, one of which showed a silent mutation. With an estimated 5-yr overall/disease-free survival of 48 ± 7%/41 ± 7%, none of the mutations analyzed showed a prognostic impact in this analysis of the largest uniformly treated cohort thus far. This especially holds true for patients with a mutation in TP53.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.12724DOI Listing
September 2016

5-azacytidine promotes an inhibitory T-cell phenotype and impairs immune mediated antileukemic activity.

Mediators Inflamm 2014 13;2014:418292. Epub 2014 Mar 13.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.

Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ + T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/418292DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3976863PMC
December 2014

Postallogeneic monitoring with molecular markers detected by pretransplant next-generation or Sanger sequencing predicts clinical relapse in patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Eur J Haematol 2014 Mar 21;92(3):189-94. Epub 2013 Nov 21.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Relapse is the major cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative syndrome neoplasms (MDS/MPN). We evaluated the impact of molecular mutations on outcome and the value of molecular monitoring post-transplantation. We screened 45 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 39 patients, including seven with transformed-acute myeloid leukemia), MDS/MPN unclassifiable (n = 5), and atypical BCR-ABL1-negative CML (n = 1) for mutations in ASXL1, CBL, NRAS, and TET2 genes by molecular genetics including a sensitive next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique. In 36 patients, sufficient DNA was available for molecular analyses. In particular, TET2 and CBL mutations were screened applying amplicon deep sequencing. In 89% of cases, at least one mutation could be detected: ASXL1: n = 18 (50%); CBL: n = 7 (19%); TET2: n = 15 (42%); and NRAS: n = 11 (32%). Survival after AHSCT at 5 yr was 46% (95% CI 28-64%) and was not influenced by any mutation. After a median of 6 months after AHSCT in 33% of the patients, one of the molecular markers was still detectable, resulting in a higher incidence of relapse than in patients with undetectable mutations (50% vs. 15%, P = 0.04). In conclusion, pretransplant molecular mutation analysis can help to detect biomarkers in patients with MPN/MDS, which may be subsequently used as minimal residual disease markers after AHSCT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.12223DOI Listing
March 2014

Impact of high-risk cytogenetics and achievement of molecular remission on long-term freedom from disease after autologous-allogeneic tandem transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2013 Mar 16;19(3):398-404. Epub 2012 Oct 16.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Within a prospective protocol, the incidence and impact of achievement of molecular remission (mCR) and high-risk cytogenetics was investigated in 73 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) after autologous (auto)-allogeneic (allo) tandem stem cell transplantation (SCT). After induction chemotherapy, patients received melphalan 200 mg/m(2) before undergoing auto-SCT, followed 3 months later by melphalan 140 mg/m(2) and fludarabine 180 mg/m(2) before allo-SCT. Sixteen patients had high-risk cytogenetic features, defined by positive FISH for del(17p13) and/or t(4;14). Overall, 66% of the patients achieved CR or near-CR, and 41% achieved mCR, which was sustained negative (at least 4 consecutive samples negative) in 15 patients (21%), with no significant difference in incidence between the patients with high-risk cytogenetics and others (P = .70). After a median follow-up of 6 years, overall 5-year progression-free survival was 29%, with no significant difference between del 17p13/t(4;14)-harboring patients and others (24% versus 30%; P = .70). The 5-year progression-free survival differed substantially according to the achieved remission: 17% for partial remission, 41% for CR, 57% for mCR, and 85% for sustained mCR. These results suggest that auto-allo tandem SCT may overcome the negative prognostic effect of del(17p13) and/or t(4;14) and that achievement of molecular remission resulted in long-term freedom from disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2012.10.008DOI Listing
March 2013

Impact of the NK cell receptor LIR-1 (ILT-2/CD85j/LILRB1) on cytotoxicity against multiple myeloma.

Clin Dev Immunol 2012 10;2012:652130. Epub 2012 Jul 10.

Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

The role of different receptors in natural-killer- (NK-) cell-mediated cytotoxicity against multiple myeloma (MM) cells is unknown. We investigated if an enhancement of NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity against MM could be reached by blocking of the inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 (LIR-1). Our investigations revealed high levels of LIR-1 expression not only on the NK cell line NK-92, but also on myeloma cells (MOLP-8, RPMI8226) as well as on a lymphoblastoid cell line (LBCL; IM-9). Subsequent cytotoxicity assays were designed to show the isolated effects of LIR-1 blocking on either the effector or the tumor side to rule out receptor-receptor interactions. Although NK-92 was shown to be capable of myeloma cell lysis, inhibition of LIR-1 on NK-92 did not enhance cytotoxicity. Targeting the receptor on MM and LBCL did not also alter NK-92-mediated lysis. We come to the conclusion that LIR-1 alone does not directly influence NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity against myeloma. To our knowledge, this work provides the first investigation of the inhibitory capability of LIR-1 in NK-92-mediated cytotoxicity against MM and the first functional evaluation of LIR-1 on MM and LBCL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/652130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3400434PMC
January 2013

Chimerism studies with quantitative real-time PCR in stem cell recipients with acute myeloid leukemia.

Exp Hematol 2010 Dec 17;38(12):1261-71. Epub 2010 Sep 17.

Interdisciplinary Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Hamburg, Martinistrasse 52, Hamburg, Germany.

Objective: Chimerism is well-established for surveillance of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but interpretation of the results and techniques is not standardized.

Materials And Methods: We correlated chimerism in 75 AML patients (38 male, 37 female) who underwent myeloablative (n = 36)/reduced (n = 39) allo-HSCT with the risk of relapse and survival. Chimerism was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for donor/recipient specific polymorphisms/Y-specific sequences.

Results: After HSCT, 40 patients (53%) achieved stable complete donor chimerism (≥ 99.0% of donor alleles), while 35 (47%) failed to achieve stable donor chimerism. Thirty-one patients (41%) showed decreasing donor alleles after having first achieved complete donor chimerism. To investigate the kinetics of mixed chimerism, patients were separated whether they showed subsequent increasing or decreasing donor alleles. Subsequent decrease of donor alleles was associated with relapses in 17 of 18 cases (94%), while no patient with subsequent increasing donor alleles relapsed (p < 0.001). Patients with mixed chimerism and increasing donor alleles had better 2-year disease-free survival (85%) than those with decreasing donor alleles (0%; p < 0.001).

Conclusions: The kinetics of mixed chimerism as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is an important prognostic predictor in the post-transplantation period of AML patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exphem.2010.08.006DOI Listing
December 2010

Minimal residual disease diagnostics in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in the post-transplant period: comparison of peripheral blood and bone marrow analysis.

Leuk Lymphoma 2010 Oct;51(10):1837-43

Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Cancer Center Hamburg, Germany.

Considering the high relapse rates of AML after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, research aims to improve post-transplant surveillance. To determine the value of peripheral blood (PB) for post-transplant minimal residual disease monitoring, we compared 38 PB and bone marrow (BM) sample pairs in 25 stem cell recipients with NPM1-mutated AML (12 males, 13 females, ages 21-73 years). NPM1A mutation levels and chimerism ratios were determined in non-separated BM/PB. We observed congruent results in 28/38 (74%). In 14/38 sample pairs (37%), BM and PB were negative for the NPM1A mutation. Fourteen sample pairs were positive in BM and PB, albeit at higher mutation levels in the BM in 11 cases (4- to 278-fold). Results were discordant in 10 cases (26%), with weakly positive mutation levels in the BM but negative levels in the PB. Cases with ≥0.2% NPM1A mutation level in BM were always positive in PB. Chimerism was concordant in BM and PB in 21/34 (62%) of sample pairs. In conclusion, MRD monitoring with qPCR for the NPM1 mutation and chimerism from non-separated PB contributes to surveillance in patients with AML in the post-transplant period, but even with highly sensitive qPCR there is a risk of failure to detect the mutation in PB.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2010.508822DOI Listing
October 2010

Impact of JAK2V617F mutation status, allele burden, and clearance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis.

Blood 2010 Nov 20;116(18):3572-81. Epub 2010 May 20.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) after reduced-intensity conditioning has become a reasonable treatment option for patients with advanced myelofibrosis. The role of characteristic molecular genetic abnormalities, such as JAK2V617F on outcome of ASCT, is not yet elucidated. In 139 of 162 myelofibrosis patients with known JAK2V617F mutation status who received ASCT after reduced-intensity conditioning, the impact of JAK2 genotype, JAK2V617F allele burden, and clearance of mutation after ASCT was evaluated. Overall survival was significantly reduced in multivariate analysis in patients harboring JAK2 wild-type (hazard ratio = 2.14, P = .01) compared with JAK2 mutated patients. No significant influence on outcome was noted for the mutated allele burden analyzed either as continuous variable or after dividing into quartiles. Achievement of JAK2V617F negativity after ASCT was significantly associated with a decreased incidence of relapse (hazard ratio = 0.22, P = .04). In a landmark analysis, patients who cleared JAK2 mutation level in peripheral blood 6 months after ASCT had a significant lower risk of relapse (5% vs 35%, P = .03). We conclude that JAK2V617F-mutated status, but not allele frequency, resulted in an improved survival and rapid clearance after allografting reduces the risk of relapse.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-12-260588DOI Listing
November 2010

Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells remain of recipient origin after allogeneic SCT and do not harbor the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with myelofibrosis.

Clin Exp Med 2010 Sep 23;10(3):205-8. Epub 2009 Jul 23.

Interdisciplinary Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Cancer Center Hamburg, Germany.

The close association of the myeloproliferative neoplasms with the activating non-receptor tyrosine kinase JAK2V617F mutation is well established. To further clarify the pathomechanisms of this mutation in patients with myelofibrosis, we performed screening with quantitative real-time PCR for the respective mutation in in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and compared the results with BM/peripheral blood (PB). Eight patients with primary/secondary myelofibrosis were investigated before (n = 4) or after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (n = 4). All patients had systemic evidence of the JAK2V617F mutation in BM/PB (mutation ratios 0.2-23.5) at the time of investigation in contrast to negative results in the MSCs (n = 7) or a very low (0.004) mutation ratio (n = 1) which was probably due to hematopoietic contamination. The four patients post-transplant had systemic donor chimerism between 96.5 and 100% in BM/PB, while MSCs showed no evidence of donor-specific alleles. In conclusion, in myelofibrosis, the JAK2V617F mutation is restricted to hematopoietic cells, and cannot explain the stromal alterations being observed in this disorder. Further, the MSCs remain of recipient origin after allogeneic SCT, which might contribute to the increased risk of graft dysfunction or failure in myelofibrosis patients after allogeneic transplantation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10238-009-0058-9DOI Listing
September 2010

Post-transplant immunotherapy with donor-lymphocyte infusion and novel agents to upgrade partial into complete and molecular remission in allografted patients with multiple myeloma.

Exp Hematol 2009 Jul 31;37(7):791-8. Epub 2009 May 31.

Department for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Objective: To investigate post-transplant immunotherapy with escalating donor-lymphocyte infusions (DLI) and novel agents (thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide) to target complete remission (CR).

Materials And Methods: Thirty-two patients with multiple myeloma who achieved only partial remission after allogeneic stem cell transplantation were treated with DLI. If no CR was achieved, one of the novel agents was added to target CR.

Results: CR defined either by European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation criteria, flow cytometry, or molecular methods as assessed by patient-specific immunoglobulin H-polymerase chain reaction or plasma cell chimerism polymerase chain reaction was accomplished in 59%, 63%, and 50% of patients, respectively. Achievement of CR resulted in improved 5-year progressive-free and overall survival, according to European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation criteria (53% vs 35%; p=0.03 and 90% vs 62%; p=0.06), flow cytometry (74% vs 15%; p=0.001 and 100% vs 52%; p=0.1), or molecular methods (84% vs 38%; p=0.001 and 100% vs 71%; p=0.03).

Conclusions: Our finding demonstrates the clinical relevance of posttransplantation therapies to upgrade remission, and of remission's depth for long-term survival in myeloma patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exphem.2009.03.008DOI Listing
July 2009
-->