Publications by authors named "Angeline Denouel"

5 Publications

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Global Disease Burden Estimates of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Acute Respiratory Infection in Older Adults in 2015: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Infect Dis 2020 Oct;222(Supplement_7):S577-S583

Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Respiratory syncytial virus-associated acute respiratory infection (RSV-ARI) constitutes a substantial disease burden in older adults aged ≥65 years. We aimed to identify all studies worldwide investigating the disease burden of RSV-ARI in this population. We estimated the community incidence, hospitalization rate, and in-hospital case-fatality ratio (hCFR) of RSV-ARI in older adults, stratified by industrialized and developing regions, using data from a systematic review of studies published between January 1996 and April 2018 and 8 unpublished population-based studies. We applied these rate estimates to population estimates for 2015 to calculate the global and regional burdens in older adults with RSV-ARI in the community and in hospitals for that year. We estimated the number of in-hospital deaths due to RSV-ARI by combining hCFR data with hospital admission estimates from hospital-based studies. In 2015, there were about 1.5 million episodes (95% confidence interval [CI], .3 million-6.9 million) of RSV-ARI in older adults in industrialized countries (data for developing countries were missing), and of these, approximately 14.5% (214 000 episodes; 95% CI, 100 000-459 000) were admitted to hospitals. The global number of hospital admissions for RSV-ARI in older adults was estimated at 336 000 hospitalizations (uncertainty range [UR], 186 000-614 000). We further estimated about 14 000 in-hospital deaths (UR, 5000-50 000) related to RSV-ARI globally. The hospital admission rate and hCFR were higher for those aged ≥65 years than for those aged 50-64 years. The disease burden of RSV-ARI among older adults is substantial, with limited data from developing countries. Appropriate prevention and management strategies are needed to reduce this burden.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz059DOI Listing
October 2020

Global and Regional Burden of Hospital Admissions for Pneumonia in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Infect Dis 2020 Oct;222(Supplement_7):S570-S576

Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh.

Pneumonia constitutes a substantial disease burden among adults overall and those who are elderly. We aimed to identify all studies investigating the disease burden among older adults (age, ≥65 years) admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. We estimated the hospital admission rate and in-hospital case-fatality ratio (CFR) of pneumonia in older adults, stratified by age and economic status (industrialized vs developing), with data from a systematic review of studies published from 1996 through 2017 and from 8 unpublished population-based studies. We applied these rate estimates to population estimates for 2015 to calculate the global and regional burden in older adults who would have been admitted to the hospital with pneumonia that year. We estimated the number of in-hospital pneumonia deaths by combining in-hospital CFRs with hospital admission estimates from hospital-based studies. We identified 109 eligible studies; 73 used clinical pneumonia as the case definition, and 36 used radiologically confirmed pneumonia as the case definition. We estimated that, in 2015, 6.8 million episodes (uncertainty range [UR], 5.8-8.0 episodes) of clinical pneumonia resulted in hospital admissions of older adults worldwide. The hospital admission rate increased with advancing age and was higher in men. The total disease burden was likely underestimated when using the definition of radiologically confirmed pneumonia. Based on data from 52 hospital studies reporting data on pneumonia mortality, we estimated that about 1.1 million in-hospital deaths (UR, 0.9-1.4 in-hospital deaths) occurred among older adults. The burden of pneumonia requiring hospitalization among older adults is substantial. Appropriate prevention and management strategies should be developed to reduce its impact.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz053DOI Listing
October 2020

Sexual Disorders of Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC) Treated With Antiangiogenic Therapies.

Clin Genitourin Cancer 2018 10 21;16(5):369-375.e1. Epub 2018 May 21.

U1086 INSERM-UCBN "Cancers & Préventions", Normandie Université, Caen, France; Departments of Clinical Research Unit, Centre François Baclesse, Caen, France; Department of Medical Oncology, Centre François Baclesse, Caen, France. Electronic address:

Background: Targeted therapies, in particular antiangiogenic therapies (AATs), have become the standard of treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Although common adverse effects like fatigue have been well-established, sexual disorders induced by these treatments, although often reported, have been poorly evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of AATs on the sexual life of patients with mRCC and the relationships with quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and biologic parameters.

Patients And Methods: This longitudinal study included patients with mRCC on first- or second-line AATs. Sexuality was evaluated by the French version of Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire short-Form (CSFQ); QoL and fatigue were measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General (FACT-G) and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20), respectively. Biologic parameters were also assessed.

Results: Among 75 patients included in the study, 39 agreed to respond to the sexual functioning questionnaire (CSFQ). At baseline, all patients had at least 1 sexual dysfunction. No relationship with QoL, fatigue, and biologic parameters was shown. After 3 months of treatment, a decrease in at least 1 sexual dimension was observed in 69% of patients. The most affected sexual dimensions were pleasure (34%) and desire/interest (38%). No significant relationship between sexual dysfunctions and biologic parameters was found. The percentage of non-participants (50%) and the absence of a control arm are the main limitations.

Discussion: Patients with mRCC exhibit sexual dysfunction that could be increased by AATs independently of the impact on fatigue and QoL. Further studies aiming to define the role of biologic parameters like inflammatory markers and thyroid parameters are warranted.

Conclusion: Sexual disorders induced or degraded by AAT are an independent side effect that should be taken into account in oncology supportive care departments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clgc.2018.05.013DOI Listing
October 2018

Biomarkers Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Treated Cancer Patients: Potential Predisposition and Risk Factors.

Front Pharmacol 2017 21;8:138. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Cancer and Cognition Platform, Ligue Nationale Contre le CancerCaen, France; Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U1086Caen, France; Medical Oncology Department, Centre François BaclesseCaen, France; Medical Oncology, University Hospital CenterCaen, France.

Cognitive impairment in cancer patients induced, at least in part, by treatment are frequently observed and likely have negative impacts on patient quality of life. Such cognitive dysfunctions can affect attention, executive functions, and memory and processing speed, can persist after treatment, and their exact causes remain unclear. The aim of this review was to create an inventory and analysis of clinical studies evaluating biological markers and risk factors for cognitive decline in cancer patients before, during, or after therapy. The ultimate objectives were to identify robust markers and to determine what further research is required to develop original biological markers to enable prevention or adapted treatment management of patients at risk. This review was guided by the PRISMA statement and included a search strategy focused on three components: "cognition disorders," "predictive factors"/"biological markers," and "neoplasms," searched in PubMed since 2005, with exclusion criteria concerning brain tumors, brain therapy, and imaging or animal studies. Twenty-three studies meeting the criteria were analyzed. Potential associations/correlations were identified between cognitive impairments and specific circulating factors, cerebral spinal fluid constituents, and genetic polymorphisms at baseline, during, and at the end of treatment in cancer populations. The most significant results were associations between cognitive dysfunctions and genetic polymorphisms, including APOE-4 and COMT-Val; increased plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6; anemia; and hemoglobin levels during chemotherapy. Plasma levels of specific hormones of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis are also modified by treatment. It is recognized in the field of cancer cognition that cancer and comorbidities, as well as chemotherapy and hormone therapy, can cause persistent cognitive dysfunction. A number of biological circulating factors and genetic polymorphisms, can predispose to the development of cognitive disorders. However, many predictive factors remain unproven and discordant findings are frequently reported, warranting additional clinical and preclinical longitudinal cohort studies, with goals of better characterization of potential biomarkers and identification of patient populations at risk and/or particularly deleterious treatments. Research should focus on prevention and personalized cancer management, to improve the daily lives, autonomy, and return to work of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2017.00138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5359273PMC
March 2017