Publications by authors named "Angelina Tjokrowidjaja"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prognostic nomogram for progression-free survival in patients with BRCA mutations and platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer on maintenance olaparib therapy following response to chemotherapy.

Eur J Cancer 2021 Sep 19;154:190-200. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia; Department of Medical Oncology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia; Australia New Zealand Gynecological Oncology Group, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: The impact of maintenance therapy with PARP inhibitors (PARPi) on progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with BRCA mutations and platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer (PSROC) varies widely. Individual prognostic factors do not reliably distinguish patients who progress early from those who have durable benefit. We developed and validated a prognostic nomogram to predict PFS in these patients.

Methods: The nomogram was developed using data from a training patient cohort with BRCA mutations and high-grade serous PSROC on the placebo arm of two maintenance therapy trials, Study 19 and SOLO2/ENGOT-ov21. We performed multivariable Cox regression analysis based on pre-treatment characteristics to develop a nomogram that predicts PFS. We assessed the discrimination and validation of the nomogram in independent validation patient cohorts treated with maintenance olaparib.

Results: The nomogram includes four PFS predictors: CA-125 at randomisation, platinum-free interval, presence of measurable disease and number of prior lines of platinum therapy. In the training (placebo) cohort (internal validation C-index 0.64), median PFS in the model-predicted good, intermediate and poor-risk groups was: 7.7 (95% CI 5.3-11.3), 5.4 (4.8-5.8) and 2.9 (2.8-4.4) months, respectively. In the validation (olaparib) cohort (C-index 0.71), median PFS in the model-predicted good, intermediate and poor-risk groups was: not reached, 16.6 (13.1-22.4) and 8.3 (7.1-10.8) months, respectively. The nomogram showed good calibration in the validation cohort (calibration plot).

Conclusions: This nomogram can be used to predict PFS and counsel patients with BRCA mutations and PSROC prior to maintenance olaparib and for stratification of patients in trials of maintenance therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2021.06.024DOI Listing
September 2021

Molecular and clinical predictors of improvement in progression-free survival with maintenance PARP inhibitor therapy in women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian cancer: A meta-analysis.

Cancer 2021 Jul 19;127(14):2432-2441. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Australia New Zealand Gynecological Oncology Group, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: The authors performed a meta-analysis to better quantify the benefit of maintenance poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (PARPi) therapy to inform practice in platinum-sensitive, recurrent, high-grade ovarian cancer for patient subsets with the following characteristics: germline BRCA mutation (gBRCAm), somatic BRCA mutation (sBRCAm), wild-type BRCA but homologous recombinant-deficient (HRD), homologous recombinant-proficient (HRP), and baseline clinical prognostic characteristics.

Methods: Randomized trials comparing a PARPi versus placebo as maintenance treatment were identified from electronic databases. Treatment estimates of progression-free survival were pooled across trials using the inverse variance weighted method.

Results: Four trials included 972 patients who received a PARPi (olaparib, 31%; niraparib, 35%; or rucaparib, 34%) and 530 patients who received placebo. For patients who had germline BRCA1 mutation (gBRCAm1) (N = 471), the hazard ratio (HR) was 0.29 (95% CI, 0.23-0.37); for those who had germline BRCA2 mutation (gBRCAm2) (N = 236), the HR was 0.26 (95% CI, 0.17-0.39); and, for those who had sBRCAm (N = 123), the HR was 0.22 (95% CI, 0.12-0.41). The treatment effect was similar between the gBRCAm and sBRCAm subsets (P = .48). In patients who had wild-type BRCA HRD tumors (excluding sBRCAm; N = 309), the HR was 0.41 (95% CI, 0.31-0.56); and, in those who had wild-type BRCA HRP tumors (N = 346), the HR was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.49-0.83). The relative treatment effect was greater for the BRCAm versus HRD (P = .03), BRCAm versus HRP (P < .00001), and HRD versus HRP (P < .00001) subsets. There was no difference in benefit based on age, response after recent chemotherapy, and prior bevacizumab.

Conclusions: In platinum-sensitive, recurrent, high-grade ovarian cancer, maintenance PARPi improves progression-free survival for all patient subsets. PARPi therapy has a similar magnitude of benefit for sBRCAm and gBRCAm. Although patients with BRCAm derive the greatest benefit, the absence of a BRCAm or HRD could not be used to exclude patients from maintenance PARPi therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.33517DOI Listing
July 2021

Concordance between CA-125 and RECIST progression in patients with germline BRCA-mutated platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer treated in the SOLO2 trial with olaparib as maintenance therapy after response to chemotherapy.

Eur J Cancer 2020 11 23;139:59-67. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; ARCAGY-GINECO, France.

Background: Limited evidence exists to support CA-125 as a valid surrogate biomarker for progression in patients with ovarian cancer on maintenance PARP inhibitor (PARPi) therapy. We aimed to assess the concordance between CA-125 and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) criteria for progression in patients with BRCA mutations on maintenance PARPi or placebo.

Methods: We extracted data on progression as defined by Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup CA-125, investigator- and independent central-assessed RECIST from the SOLO2/ENGOT-ov21(NCT01874353) trial. We excluded those with progression other than by RECIST, progression on date of randomisation, and no repeat CA-125 beyond baseline. We evaluated the concordance between CA-125 progression and RECIST progression, and assessed the negative (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV).

Results: Of 295 randomised patients, 275 (184 olaparib, 91 placebo) were included. 171 patients had investigator-assessed RECIST progression. Of 80 patients with CA-125 progression, 77 had concordant RECIST progression (PPV 96%, 95% confidence interval 90-99%). Of 195 patients without CA-125 progression, 94 had RECIST progression (NPV 52%, 45-59%). Within treatment arms, PPV was similar (olaparib: 95% [84-99%], placebo: 97% [87-100%]) but NPV was lower in patients on placebo (olaparib: 60% [52-68%], placebo: 30% [20-44%]). Of 94 patients with RECIST but without CA-125 progression, 64 (68%) had CA-125 that remained within normal range. We observed similar findings using independent-assessed RECIST.

Conclusions: Almost half the patients without CA-125 progression had RECIST progression, and most of these had CA-125 within the normal range. Regular computed tomography imaging should be considered as part of surveillance in patients treated with or without maintenance olaparib rather than relying on CA-125 alone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2020.08.021DOI Listing
November 2020

The impact of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio on risk reclassification of patients with advanced renal cell cancer to guide risk-directed therapy.

Acta Oncol 2020 Jan 29;59(1):20-27. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

An elevated neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is associated with poor prognosis in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We examined whether the addition of NLR improves the risk reclassification of advanced RCC using current prognostic tools from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC). Using randomised data from the COMPARZ trial of first-line pazopanib vs. sunitinib in advanced RCC, we constructed multivariable models containing MSKCC and IMDC predictor variables with and without NLR. We evaluated model discrimination using the concordance index (C-index). We computed net reclassification improvement to quantify patient reclassification into low/intermediate/poor risk groups with the addition of NLR. Of 1102 patients, NLR ≥ 5 (16%) was associated with shorter survival adjusting for MSKCC variables (adjusted HR 1.89, < .001). Adding NLR to MSKCC variables increased the C-index by 0.01. Among patients who died before 24 months ( = 415), adding NLR reclassified 8% and 2% to a higher and lower risk category, respectively. Among those alive at 24 months ( = 636), adding NLR reclassified 4% and 1% to a higher and lower risk category, respectively. This finding translates to a net benefit of eight additional patients who die within 24 months correctly identified as poor risk per 1000 patients tested. We obtained similar results when evaluating NLR with IMDC variables. NLR does not substantially improve risk reclassification over pre-existing prognostic tools. MSKCC and IMDC classifications remain the standard for guiding risk-directed therapy and trial stratification of patients with advanced RCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2019.1656342DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7577380PMC
January 2020

Let's talk about cytotoxic chemotherapy dosing: unravelling adjustments and off-protocol prescribing.

Med J Aust 2019 02 21;210(2):65-66. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Prince of Wales Hospital and Community Health Services, Sydney, NSW.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5694/mja2.12072DOI Listing
February 2019

'A most malignant malady': a rare case of laryngeal tuberculosis in epidermal growth factor receptor mutant lung adenocarcinoma.

Intern Med J 2017 10;47(10):1215-1216

Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.13560DOI Listing
October 2017
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