Publications by authors named "Angela DeRosa"

5 Publications

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Gender Bias in the Treatment of Menopausal Women: I am Hot as Hell and Not Going to Take It Anymore, Part 2.

Authors:
Angela DeRosa

Int J Pharm Compd 2021 Jan-Feb;25(1):14-17

Hormonal Health Institute, Scottsdale, Arizona.

This represents part two of a two-part article on the topic of gender bias within hormone replacement therapy and the well-orchestrated attempt by the pharmaceutical industry to eliminate bioidentical hormones, as well as to downplay the important role of compounding pharmacies in fulfilling the needs of women in this longstanding gender gap. Part one of this two-part article was published in the November/December 2020 issue of the International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding. That article discussed two of the four most prevalent reasons for this bias, Protecting the Bottom Line and Lack of Patent Protection. This article concludes this discussion with reasons three and four, Exclusion of Women in Medical Research and Fear and Retribution.
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January 2021

Gender Bias in the Treatment of Menopausal Women: I am Hot as Hell and Not Going to Take It Anymore, Part 1.

Authors:
Angela DeRosa

Int J Pharm Compd 2020 Nov-Dec;24(6):466-470

Hormonal Health Institute, Scottsdale, Arizona.

Gender bias within hormone replacement therapy has been prevalent for decades, and the circumstances surrounding this bias continue to worsen. A billion-dollar industry has been built on dozens of testosterone replacement therapies and medications to treat andropause and erectile dysfunction for men; women have been less fortunate. This article discusses this bias and the well-orchestrated attempt by the pharmaceutical industry to eliminate bioidentical hormones, as well as to downplay the important role of compounding pharmacies in fulfilling the needs of women in this longstanding gender gap.
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November 2020

Progressively Worsening Cyclic Rash: Diagnosis and Approach to Care.

J Am Osteopath Assoc 2015 Dec;115(12):738-44

Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (AIPD) is an uncommon condition in which allergic dermatitis to endogenous progesterone manifests in cyclic cutaneous eruptions. In this case series, we present 3 patients with AIPD, each with unique presentations and medical histories emblematic of the disease. Cyclic dermatitis related to menses in a premenopausal woman should raise high clinical suspicion for AIPD, especially in the primary care or emergency setting. Because of the rarity of this disorder, this case series seeks to describe AIPD to medical providers of young women, as well as present relevant literature related to the disease. We propose clinical considerations for women of reproductive age with AIPD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2015.150DOI Listing
December 2015

Subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy: the "first steps" in treating men with spinal cord injuries.

J Am Osteopath Assoc 2013 Dec;113(12):921-5

OMS IV, 19555 N 59th Ave, Glendale, AZ 85308-6813.

The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with hormone level concerns 6 months after a rock climbing accident that resulted in paraplegia. Hypogonadism was diagnosed, and the patient received subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy. Within 6 months, the patient had substantial improvement in muscle function and was able to take several steps with the assistance of crutches or a walker. This case highlights the potential improvement in quality of life and overall prognosis resulting from the subcutaneous pellet form of testosterone when used as part of the overall treatment plan in such patients. Considering the overwhelming preponderance of hypogonadism in men with spinal cord injuries, the standard of care for such patients should include screening, laboratory hormone evaluation, and prompt treatment for testosterone deficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2013.071DOI Listing
December 2013

Hip fracture patients are not treated for osteoporosis: a call to action.

Arthritis Rheum 2002 Dec;47(6):651-4

University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Objective: To determine whether hip fracture patients, a group at very high risk for additional fragility fractures, are being evaluated and treated effectively for osteoporosis.

Methods: Clinical and bone densitometry (dual x-ray absorptiometry [DXA]) records were reviewed in hip fracture patients at 4 Midwestern US health systems to determine the frequency of DXA use, calcium and vitamin D supplementation, and antiresorptive drug treatment.

Results: DXA was performed at the 4 study sites in only 12%, 12%, 13%, and 24% of patients, respectively. Calcium and vitamin D supplements were prescribed in 27%, 1%, 3%, and 25% of the patients at the 4 study sites. Antiresorptive drugs were prescribed in 26%, 12%, 7%, and 37% of the patients with only 2-10% receiving a bisphosphonate.

Conclusion: Reducing osteoporotic fractures will require more effective approaches to managing hip fracture patients and other high-risk populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.10787DOI Listing
December 2002