Publications by authors named "Andrzej Kędziorski"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Vitellogenin expression, DNA damage, health status of cells and catalase activity in Acheta domesticus selected according to their longevity after graphene oxide treatment.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Oct 16;737:140274. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

University of Silesia in Katowice, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Institute of Biology, Biotechnology and Environmental Protection, Bankowa 9, 40-007 Katowice, Poland.

The increased use of graphene oxide (GO) raises worrisome questions regarding its possible threat to various ecosystems. Invertebrates represent valuable organisms for environmental studies. The lifespan can influence the ability to cope with toxins, especially those that act via oxidative stress. Two strains of Acheta domesticus, which are selected for longevity, were tested. The main aim was to investigate how GO, when administrated in food, affects: the condition of cells, DNA stability, ROS generation and the reproduction potential (the Vitellogenin (Vg) protein expression). The "recovery effect" - after removing GO from the diet for 15 days - was also measured. The results revealed different responses to GO in the wild (H) and long-living (D) strains. The D strain had a higher catalase activity compared to the H strain on the 25th day of the imago stage. Removing GO from the food resulted in a decrease in the catalase activity to the level of the control. On the 5th day of the imago stage, the H strain had a higher cell mortality than the D strain in the GO-intoxicated groups. There was more DNA damage in the H strain compared to the long-living strain. A remedial effect was seen after the GO was removed from the diet. The total Vg protein expression was higher in the H strain and lower in the D strain. The results indicated a GO concentration-dependent outcome. In both strains, removing the GO from the food led to a high Vg expression. The Vg expression after GO treatment, particularly translation and post-translational processing, should be studied in detail in the future. The D strain of crickets had more specialized mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis than the H strain. Organisms can fight off negative effects of GO, especially when they have systems that are well developed against oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.140274DOI Listing
October 2020

Graphene oxide as a new anthropogenic stress factor - multigenerational study at the molecular, cellular, individual and population level of Acheta domesticus.

J Hazard Mater 2020 09 19;396:122775. Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Faculty of Natural Sciences, Institute of Biology, Biotechnology and Environmental Protection, University of Silesia in Katowice, Bankowa 9, PL, 40-007, Katowice, Poland.

Although interest in transgenerational phenomena is constantly growing, little is known about the long-term toxicity of nanoparticles. In this study we investigate the multigenerational effects of graphene oxide (GO) which was given to Acheta domesticus in low doses (0.2, 2 and 20 μg·g of food) for three subsequent generations. We assessed the influence of GO nanoparticles in many contexts, basing on parameters which represented different levels of biological organization: activity of antioxidant enzymes, level of apoptosis, DNA damage, histological analysis, hatching abilities, body mass and body length of insects, as well as their survival rate. The results have shown that exposing insects to nanoparticles over an extended period of time causes surprising intergenerational effects, based on significant differences in the life cycle and reproductive processes, which are not always dose-dependent. The second generation of insects appeared as the most unstable among the parameters that were studied, and did not match trends and patterns in the first and third generation categories. An increase of DNA damage was observed, but only in the third generation. This reduction of genome stability can be perceived as an essential element of adaptation, leading to an increase of genotype variants, which then undergo selection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.122775DOI Listing
September 2020

Enhancement of and interference among higher order multipole transitions in molecules near a plasmonic nanoantenna.

Nat Commun 2019 12 18;10(1):5775. Epub 2019 Dec 18.

Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100, Torun, Poland.

Spontaneous emission of quantum emitters can be modified by their optical environment, such as a resonant nanoantenna. This impact is usually evaluated under assumption that each molecular transition is dominated only by one multipolar channel, commonly the electric dipole. In this article, we go beyond the electric dipole approximation and take light-matter coupling through higher-order multipoles into account. We investigate a strong enhancement of the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole emission channels of a molecule adjacent to a plasmonic nanoantenna. Additionally, we introduce a framework to study interference effects between various transition channels in molecules by rigorous quantum-chemical calculations of their multipolar moments and a consecutive investigation of the transition rate upon coupling to a nanoantenna. We predict interference effects between these transition channels, which allow in principle for a full suppression of radiation by exploiting destructive interference, waiving limitations imposed on the emitter's coherence time by spontaneous emission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13748-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6920377PMC
December 2019

Evaluation of selected biological properties of the hunting web spider (Steatoda grossa, Theridiidae) in the aspect of short- and long-term exposure to cadmium.

Sci Total Environ 2019 Mar 26;656:297-306. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, Katowice 40-007, Poland.

The study aimed at comparing the effects of short- and long-term exposure of Steatoda grossa female spiders to cadmium on the web's architecture, its energy content, and ultrastructure of ampullate glands. Simple food chain model (medium with 0.25 mM CdCl → Drosophila hydei flies → spider (for 4 weeks or 12 months) was used for the exposure. Analysis of Cd content provided evidence that silk fibers of the web are well protected against its incorporation irrespectively of the exposure period. Long-term exposure to cadmium resulted in the occurrence of numerous autophagosomes with degenerated organelles as well as apoptotic and necrotic cells in the ampullate glands. Concurrently, the individual silk fibers building double and multiple combination complexes were significantly thinner than in the control threads. Moreover, exposed spiders spun net with smaller mean calorific value than did the control individuals. Hence, evaluation of both the diameter of silk fibers and calorific value of the web can serve as biomarkers of the effects caused by exposure of these predators to cadmium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.11.374DOI Listing
March 2019

Chronic toxicity of nanodiamonds can disturb development and reproduction of Acheta domesticus L.

Environ Res 2018 10 3;166:602-609. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, University of Silesia in Katowice, Bankowa 9, PL 40-007 Katowice, Poland.

The use of nanodiamonds in numerous materials designed for industry and medicine is growing rapidly. Consequently health and environmental risks associated with the exposure of humans and other biota to nanodiamonds-based materials are of the utmost importance. Scarcity of toxicological data for these particles led us to examine the potentially deleterious effects of nanodiamonds in model insect species, Acheta domesticus (Orthoptera) chronically exposed to ND in its diet. Organism-level end-point indices (lifespan, body weight, consumption, caloric value of faeces, reproduction) revealed adverse changes in the treated crickets in comparison with the control. Preliminary studies of oxidative stress level in the offspring of ND-treated crickets suggest toxicity of these particles limited to the exposed individuals. EPR analysis showing increase of radical signal in the faeces of ND-fed crickets led us to propose novel mechanism of nanodiamonds toxicity that is discussed in the light of literature data.

Capsule: Development and reproduction of Acheta domesticus can be disturbed by the chronic exposure to nanodiamonds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2018.05.027DOI Listing
October 2018

Lifespan differences between queens and workers are not explained by rates of molecular damage.

Exp Gerontol 2017 06 8;92:1-6. Epub 2017 Mar 8.

Department of Ecology and Evolution, Biophore, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address:

The biological processes that underlie senescence are of universal biological importance, yet they remain poorly understood. A popular theory proposes that senescence is the result of limited investment into mechanisms involved in the prevention and repair of molecular damage, leading to an accumulation of molecular damage with age. In ants, queen and worker lifespans differ by an order of magnitude, and this remarkable difference in lifespan has been shown to be associated with differences in the expression of genes involved in DNA and protein repair. Here we use the comet assay and Western Blotting for poly-ubiquitinated proteins to explore whether these differences in expression lead to differences in the accumulation of DNA damage (comet assay) or protein damage (protein ubiquitination) with age. Surprisingly, there was no difference between queens and workers in the rate of accumulation of DNA damage. We also found that levels of ubiquitinated proteins decreased with age, as previously reported in honeybees. This is in contrast to what has been found in model organisms such as worms and flies. Overall, these results reveal that the link between investment into macromolecular repair, age-related damage accumulation and lifespan is more complex than usually recognised.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2017.03.008DOI Listing
June 2017

The effect of ingested cadmium on the calorific value and structural properties of hunting webs produced by Steatoda grossa (Theridiidae) spiders.

Sci Total Environ 2017 May 22;586:1298-1307. Epub 2017 Feb 22.

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, Katowice 40-007, Poland.

The study aimed to assess whether cadmium administered via ingestion to Steatoda grossa cobweb spiders (Theridiidae) affects the energy content and selected structural properties of the produced hunting webs. Cadmium content in webs was assessed with AAS and SEM X-ray microanalysis, while the diameters of silk fibers were estimated with SEM. The energy content of samples was measured in an oxygen micro-bomb calorimeter. Females and males showed different reactions to cadmium supplied through food. In comparison to females, males displayed higher metal concentrations in their bodies and hunting webs, however their calorific values and structural features were not significantly changed. Cadmium-treated females spun webs with smaller single-strand diameters and more frequent multi-stranded threads and invested 47% less energy in web production than the control individuals. It cannot be excluded that such a reduction in energy expenditure for web building in females resulted from energetically costly detoxifying reactions triggered in response to direct and indirect effects of cadmium toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.143DOI Listing
May 2017

The first example of ab initio calculations of f-f transitions for the case of [Eu(DOTP)] complex-experiment versus theory.

Phys Chem Chem Phys 2016 Oct;18(40):27808-27817

University of Wrocław, Faculty of Chemistry, Address F. Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wrocław, Poland.

Crystal structures and photophysical properties (IR and UV-vis-NIR) of two compounds, [C(NH)][Eu(DOTP)]·12.5HO and K[Eu(DOTP)]·11HO (DOTP = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakis (methylenephosphonic acid)), were determined. The DOTP ligand is bonded to Euvia four O and four N atoms, filling thus eight coordination sites of Eu. The experimental structures of two [KEu(DOTP)] clusters were used as a starting point for theoretical ab initio calculations based on a multireference wavefunction approach. Positions of the energy levels of the 4f configuration of the Eu ion have been calculated and compared with those derived from the experimental spectra. This enabled us to tentatively assign energy levels of the Eu ion. The relationship between calculated energies of excited states and Eu-N and Eu-O bond lengths was discussed with respect to the nephelauxetic effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cp05284cDOI Listing
October 2016

Parnassius apollo last-instar larvae development prediction by analysis of weather condition as a tool in the species' conservation.

C R Biol 2014 May 24;337(5):325-31. Epub 2014 Apr 24.

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, 40-007 Katowice, Poland.

Parnassius apollo (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) has already disappeared or is under threat of extinction in many of its former habitats. It has been documented that weather conditions--anomalies in particular--contributed to this process. In this study, we combined developmental data obtained previously for the last-instar Apollo larvae (collected in 1996, 1997, and 2003) with corresponding meteorological data to assess the effects of ambient temperature and rainfall episodes on the duration and the completion of the instar. For comparing the temperature effect, we applied the degree-day concept. We found significant positive correlation between the number of rainy days during the instar development (x) and its duration time (y): y=8.293+0.936x (±2.813) (r=0.662, P<10(-7)). Logarithmic transformation of the growth curves of the last-instar Apollo larvae revealed that there was no difference in growth among females; however, there was slower growth of males in 2003 in comparison to 1996. Growth (y) of female Apollo larvae as a function of instar duration (x) can by described by one common equation, irrespectively of the year: y=317.6+502.3 lnx (±263.3) (r=0.82, P<10(-4)).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crvi.2014.03.004DOI Listing
May 2014

Ab initio theoretical study on the 4f(2) and 4f5d electronic manifolds of cubic defects in CaF2:Pr3+.

J Phys Chem A 2014 Jan 30;118(2):358-68. Epub 2013 Dec 30.

Instytut Fizyki Teoretycznej i Astrofizyki, Uniwersytet Gdański , ul. Wita Stwosza 57, 80-952 Gdańsk, Poland.

Wave function-based embedded cluster ab initio calculations have been carried out in order to study the 4f(2) and 4f5d energy levels of the cubic substitutional defect of Pr-doped CaF2. The 4f(2) → 4f5d absorption spectrum and 4f5d → 4f(2) emission spectrum have been calculated. The 4f(2 1)S0 level is found to be immersed in the 4f5d(eg) manifold, so that no quantum cutting from (1)S0 can occur and only strong 4f5d(eg) → 4f(2) emission is predicted, which supports previous assumptions made in order to explain results in CaF2:Pr(3+). The details of the 4f(2) → 4f5d(eg) and 4f(2) → 4f5d(t2g) bands of the absorption spectrum are interpreted and assignments are made. The lowest level of the 4f5d(eg) configuration is found to have 80% of singlet character, in opposition to Hund's Rules, and the issue is discussed in detail. The comparison between the experimental 4f5d(eg) → 4f(2) high resolution emission spectrum of the cubic site of CaF2:Pr(3+) and the calculated emission spectra from the two lowest 4f5d(eg) states 1T2u((1)T2u) and 1Eu(1(3)T2u) suggests the possibility that the experimental emission of the cubic Pr defect of CaF2:Pr(3+) is in fact a multiple emission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp410740uDOI Listing
January 2014

DNA damage in grasshoppers' larvae--comet assay in environmental approach.

Chemosphere 2014 Feb 8;96:180-7. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, PL 40-007 Katowice, Poland.

The comet assay that provides a quantitative measure of the DNA-strand breaks may be used for assessing the 'genotoxic potential' of the environment. Young adults of Chorthippus brunneus (Orthoptera), collected at three sites in Southern Poland, differing in the level of pollution, particularly with heavy metals: Pilica (reference), Olkusz (moderately polluted) and Szopienice (heavily polluted) - were allowed to mate under laboratory conditions that were free from any pollution. Egg-pods were collected and, after diapause, brain cells from one-day old larvae were used for the comet assay. We compared the level of DNA damage in the larvae originating from these sites and also measured time-dependent DNA repair after single 10min. application of H2O2 (20μM final concentration). The DNA damage was relatively low in larval cells irrespectively of the site pollution their parents came from. However, measured comet parameters - tail DNA content (TDNA), tail length (TL), and olive tail moment (OTM) - were significantly higher in larvae originating from the Szopienice site than in those from the reference site. Incubation of cells with H2O2 resulted in significantly higher values of the comet parameters in the insects from all the study sites with the highest ones observed in the offspring of grasshoppers from Szopienice. Moreover, DNA repair, following the treatment, did not occur in the latter group. These data contribute to almost unexplored subject of genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in insects. They are discussed in the light of the concept of adaptive strategies in energy allocation depending on the level of biotope pollution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2013.10.033DOI Listing
February 2014

The reproductive potential of the spiders Agelena labyrinthica and Xerolycosa nemoralis from areas contaminated with metals.

Sci Total Environ 2012 Oct 5;435-436:374-9. Epub 2012 Aug 5.

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, PL40007 Katowice, Poland.

Spiders successfully colonize industrially contaminated environments and maintain relatively stable populations. The aim of this study was to explain the reproductive strategies of two spider species, Xerolycosa nemoralis (an actively hunting, sit-and-pursue predator) and Agelena labyrinthica (a web-building, sit-and-wait predator), between contaminated and uncontaminated sites. Spiders were collected from a reference site (Pilica) and two contaminated sites (Olkusz and Welnowiec). The amount of energy allocated to the eggs and the number of eggs and hatchlings as well as the hatching success were compared. Wolf spiders from the contaminated sites produced fewer but relatively energy-rich eggs, whereas web-building spiders invested their energy in the production of a higher number of less energy-rich eggs. The comparisons of the hatching percentages suggested that in the contaminated habitats, X. nemoralis achieve a hatching success similar to or higher than that of the reference population at Pilica. A. labyrinthica in the contaminated sites invested a larger amount of energy in eggs than at the reference site, but the hatching success found for this species in the contaminated areas was lower than that found at the reference site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.06.102DOI Listing
October 2012

Occurrence of sarmentosin and other hydroxynitrile glucosides in Parnassius (papilionidae) butterflies and their food plants.

J Chem Ecol 2012 May 25;38(5):525-37. Epub 2012 Apr 25.

Plant Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology and the VKR Centre of Excellence Pro-Active Plants, University of Copenhagen, 40 Thorvaldsensvej, Frederiksberg C, 1871, Denmark.

Sequestration of plant secondary metabolites is a widespread phenomenon among aposematic insects. Sarmentosin is an unsaturated γ-hydroxynitrile glucoside known from plants and some Lepidoptera. It is structurally and biosynthetically closely related to cyanogenic glucosides, which are commonly sequestered from food plants and/or de novo synthesized by lepidopteran species. Sarmentosin was found previously in Parnassius (Papilionidae) butterflies, but it was not known how the occurrence was related to food plants or whether Parnassius species could biosynthesize the compound. Here, we report on the occurrence of sarmentosin and related compounds in four different Parnassius species belonging to two different clades, as well as their known and suspected food plants. There were dramatic differences between the two clades, with P. apollo and P. smintheus from the Apollo group containing high amounts of sarmentosin, and P. clodius and P. mnemosyne from the Mnemosyne group containing low or no detectable amounts. This was reflected in the larval food plants; P. apollo and P. smintheus larvae feed on Sedum species (Crassulaceae), which all contained considerable amounts of sarmentosin, while the known food plants of the two other species, Dicentra and Corydalis (Fumariaceae), had no detectable levels of sarmentosin. All insects and plants containing sarmentosin also contained other biosynthetically related hydroxynitrile glucosides in patterns previously reported for plants, but not for insects. Not all findings could be explained by sequestration alone and we therefore hypothesize that Parnassius species are able to de novo synthesize sarmentosin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10886-012-0114-xDOI Listing
May 2012

Midgut protease activities in monophagous larvae of Apollo butterfly, Parnassius apollo ssp. frankenbergeri.

C R Biol 2007 Feb 16;330(2):126-34. Epub 2007 Jan 16.

University of Silesia, Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, Bankowa 9, 40-007 Katowice, Poland.

We assayed the relative activities of midgut proteolytic enzymes in individuals of the fourth (L(4)) and fifth (L(5)) instar of Apollo larvae, inhabiting Pieniny Mts (southern Poland). The comparisons between midgut tissue with glicocalyx (MT) and liquid midgut contents with peritrophic membrane (MC) were made. Optimal media pHs of the assayed proteolytic enzymes in P. apollo midgut samples were similar to those of other lepidopteran species. Endopeptidases, as well as carboxypeptidases, digested effectively in alkaline environment, while aminopeptidases were active in a broad pH range. Trypsin is probably the main endoprotease (correlation with caseinolytic activity in MC of L(5) larvae: r=0.606; p=0.004); however, its activity was low as compared with that in other leaf-eating Lepidoptera. This suggests a minor role of trypsin and chymotrypsin in protein digestion in Apollo larvae, probably due to limited availability of the leaf proteins. Instead, due to very high carboxypeptidase A activity in midgut tissue, the larvae obtain exogenous amino acids either directly or from oligopeptides and glycoproteins. High and significant positive correlations between the enzyme activity and glucosidase as well as galactosidase activities strongly support this opinion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crvi.2006.12.002DOI Listing
February 2007

Midgut glycosidases activities in monophagous larvae of Apollo butterfly, Parnassius apollo ssp. frankenbergeri.

C R Biol 2006 Oct 2;329(10):765-74. Epub 2006 Aug 2.

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, PL 40-007 Katowice, Poland.

Parnassius apollo (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) declines on numerous localities all over Europe. Its local subspecies frankenbergeri, inhabiting the Pieniny Mts (southern Poland) and successfully recovered from extinction, is monophagous in larval stage. In natural conditions, it completes development on the orpine Sedum telephium ssp. maximum. Since proper quality and quantity of necessary nutritional compounds of the food plant ensure developmental success, the digestive processes in the insect midgut should reflect adaptation to a specific food source. The paper presents, for the first time, the activity of detected glycolytic enzymes in midgut tissue and liquid gut contents of the L4 and L5 instars of P. apollo larvae. alpha-Amylase plays the main role in utilization of carbohydrates, contrary to cellulase activity. Saccharase seems to be the main disaccharidase, and high activity of beta-glycosidase enables hydrolysis of the plant glycosides. Trehalase activity was unexpectedly low and comparable to those of cellobiase and lactase. alpha-Amylolytic and other glycolytic activities indicate that larvae utilize starch and other carbohydrate compounds as energy sources. Possible use of some plant allelochemicals as energy sources by Apollo larvae is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crvi.2006.06.009DOI Listing
October 2006

Feeding preferences of the Apollo butterfly (Parnassius apollo ssp. frankenbergeri) larvae inhabiting the Pieniny Mts (southern Poland).

C R Biol 2005 Mar;328(3):235-42

Department of Animal Physiology and Ecotoxicology, University of Silesia, Bankowa 9, PL 40-007 Katowice, Poland.

Parnassius apollo (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) is considered to be typical stenophagous species. Its European forms fall generally into 'telephiophagous' or 'albophagous' trophic groups. According to some authors, 'telephiophagous' P. apollo ssp. frankenbergeri SLABY, inhabiting the Pieniny Mts, has a rather broad spectrum of food-plants. We aimed at defining its feeding preferences for successful breeding in a semi-natural colony on more than one commercially-available Sedum species. Larval development (L5) and performance were assessed in three experimental groups fed on different plant species selected in a preliminary test. Apollo larvae appeared to be quite specific in the plant choice and developed poorly in the absence of Sedum telephium. Possible reasons of this are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crvi.2004.12.004DOI Listing
March 2005