Publications by authors named "Andrew O"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reference interval establishment of full blood count extended research parameters in the multi-ethnic population of Malaysia.

Med J Malaysia 2019 12;74(6):534-536

Hospital Ampang, Haematology Department, Clinical Haematology Referral Laboratory, Ampang, Selangor, Malaysia.

Haematological cellular structures may be elucidated using automated full blood count (FBC) analysers such as Unicel DxH 800 via cell population data (CPD) analysis. The CPD values are generated by calculating volume, conductivity, and five types of scatter angles of individual cells which would form clusters or populations. This study considered 126 CPD parameter values of 1077 healthy Malaysian adults to develop reference intervals for each CPD parameter. The utility of the CPD reference interval established may range from understanding the normal haematological cellular structures to analysis of distinct cellular features related to the development of haematological disorders and malignancies.
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December 2019

Decreased expression of profilin 2 in oral squamous cell carcinoma and its clinicopathological implications.

Oncol Rep 2011 Oct 28;26(4):813-23. Epub 2011 Jun 28.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ninth People's Hospital, College of Stomatology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011, PR China.

Profilins are small proteins essential for many normal cellular dynamics and constitute one of the crucial components of actin-based cellular motility. Several recent studies have implicated a role for the profilin (PFN) family in cancer pathogenesis and progression. However, their expression and promising functions are largely unknown in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, we analyzed the correlation between PFN1 and PFN2 expression in vitro and in vivo. The protein expression levels were roughly compared between cell lines (HIOEC, HB96) with the employment of mass spectrometry. PFN2 was singled out as one of the significantly down-regulated genes in the cancerous HB96 cells. The expression levels of PFN1 and PFN2 in vitro were validated by RT-PCR, real-time PCR and Western blotting. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used for the first time to assess the localization of PFN2 expression. In subsequent experiments, we observed the relationship between PFN2 expression levels and the proliferation of transfected HB96 cancer cells. VASP, N-WASP and P27 expression was also examined in the PFN2-transfected or non-transfected HB96 cells. In vivo, antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemical analyses in 88 paired tissue specimens. Decreased protein expression was confirmed in cancerous tissues from 88 OSCC patients compared with paracancerous normal mucous epithelia. Tumors with weak PFN2 expression were associated with a significantly worse prognosis than strongly expressed tumours (P<0.001). Other statistical analyses were performed to assess the differences in expression and their clinical and pathological significance. In conclusion, PFN2 can be utilized as both a potential suppressor marker and a prognostic protein for OSCC. The function of PFN2 may be to regulate the N-WASP/Arp2/3 signaling pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/or.2011.1365DOI Listing
October 2011

Tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease.

Am J Med 1980 Jan;68(1):59-65

Ten patients with proved disease caused by Myocobacterium tuberculosis were identified over a 10 year period in a population of 172 adult patients undergoing long-term dialysis. The incidence of tuberculosis was 12 times greater than that prevailing in the general community during the period of the study and could not be accounted for solely by demographic factors. Diagnosis was obscured because the symptoms were nonspecific and attributable to uremia, intermediate strength (5 TU) tuberculin tests were often negative, the roentgenographic appearance of pulmonary disease was often atypical, and there was more frequent extrapulmonary involvement. Impaired cellular immunity due to advanced renal failure may predispose to the increased incidence of tuberculosis and the greater frequency of extrapulmonary disease observed. Treatment was safe and effective in these patients using 300 mg of isoniazid and 8 to 10 mg/kg of ethambutol daily. Eight patients survived longer than one year following the diagnosis of tuberculosis, and all were clinically cured. No deaths were directly attributed to tuberculosis. A high index of suspicion and aggressive evaluation may be necessary to diminish the significant mortality described previously in association with disseminated disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0002-9343(80)90166-7DOI Listing
January 1980