Publications by authors named "Andrew James-Kay"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The in vitro secretome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis induces cell death in banana leaves.

Plant Physiol Biochem 2011 Jun 12;49(6):572-8. Epub 2011 Feb 12.

Unidad de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular de Plantas, Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán AC, Calle 43, No 130, Colonia Chuburná de Hidalgo, 97200 Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico.

The hemibiotrophic filamentous fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis causes the banana foliar disease known as black Sigatoka, responsible for major worldwide losses in the banana fruit industry. In this work the in vitro secretome of M. fijiensis was characterized. Native and denaturant polyacrylamide gel protease assays showed the M. fijiensis secretome contains protease activity capable of degrading gelatin. Necrotic lesions on leaves were produced by application of the in vitro secretome to the surface of one black Sigatoka-resistant banana wild species, one susceptible cultivar and the non-host plant Carica papaya. To distinguish if necrosis by the secretome is produced by phytotoxins or proteins, the latter ones were precipitated with ammonium sulfate and applied in native or denatured forms onto leaves of the same three plant species. Proteins applied in both preparations were able to produce necrotic lesions. Application of Pronase, a commercial bacterial protease suggested that the necrosis was, at least in part, caused by protease activity from the M. fijiensis secretome. The ability to cause necrotic lesions between M. fijiensis secreted- and ammonium sulfate-precipitated proteins, and purified lipophilic or hydrophilic phytotoxins, was compared. The results suggested that leaf necrosis arises from the combined action of non-host specific hydrolytic activities from the secreted proteins and the action of phytotoxins. This is the first characterization of the M. fijiensis protein secretome produced in vitro but, more importantly, it is also the first time the M. fijiensis secretome has been shown to contain virulence factors capable of causing necrosis to its natural host.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2011.02.006DOI Listing
June 2011

Construction of a genetic linkage map of the fungal pathogen of banana Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black leaf streak disease.

Curr Genet 2008 May 26;53(5):299-311. Epub 2008 Mar 26.

Unidad de Biotecnología, Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, Calle 43 No. 130. Colonia Chuburná de Hidalgo, 97200 Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico.

A genetic linkage map of the fungal plant pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black leaf streak disease of banana was developed. A cross between the isolates CIRAD86 (from Cameroon) and CIRAD139A (from Colombia) was analyzed using molecular markers and the MAT locus. The genetic linkage map consists of 298 AFLP and 16 SSR markers with 23 linkage groups, containing five or more markers, covering 1,879 cM. Markers are separated on average by around 5.9 cM. The MAT locus was shown to segregate in a 1:1 ratio but could not be successfully mapped. An estimate of the relation between physical size and genetic distance was approximately 39.0 kb/cM. The estimated total haploid genome size was calculated using the genetic mapping data at 4,298.2 cM. This is the first genetic linkage map reported for this important foliar pathogen of banana. The great utility of the map will be for anchoring contigs in the genome sequence, evolutionary studies in comparison with other fungi, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with aggressiveness or oxidative stress resistance and with the recently available genome sequence, for positional cloning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00294-008-0186-xDOI Listing
May 2008

Construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome library of the causal agent of Black Sigatoka fungal leaf spot disease of banana and plantain, Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

Mol Biotechnol 2007 May;36(1):64-70

Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, Unidad de Biotecnología, Calle 43 No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, Mérida, Yucatán, 97200, México.

A bacterial artificial chromosome library of the causal agent of the Black Sigatoka leaf spot disease of banana and plantain, Mycosphaerella fijiensis, has been constructed using a non-sphaeroplasting technique and characterized using both homologous and heterologous probes. After first and a second size selection of PFGE-fractionated DNA, a ligation was obtained using a 1:4 molar ratio (insert:vector). One hundred random clones were analyzed, and the mean insert size was estimated to be 90 kb. The range of the insert sizes was between 40 and 160 kb. The highest percentage of inserts belonged to the range between 80 and 100 kb; 32% of the inserts had 2 or 3 internal NotI sites. This library consists of 1920 clones, if the genomic size is at least 35 Mb, then this represents 4.9 x genome equivalents, which was supported by hybridization results with homologous and heterologous probes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12033-007-0016-2DOI Listing
May 2007

Structural and phylogenetic analysis of Pto-type disease resistance gene candidates in banana.

Mol Genet Genomics 2007 Oct 22;278(4):443-53. Epub 2007 Jun 22.

Unidad de Biotecnología, Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, Calle 43, No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200, Mérida, Yucatán, México.

The tomato Pto gene encodes a serine/threonine kinase (STK) whose molecular characterization has provided valuable insights into the disease resistance mechanism of tomato and it is considered as a promising candidate for engineering broad-spectrum pathogen resistance in this crop. In this study, a pair of degenerate primers based on conserved subdomains of plant STKs similar to the tomato Pto protein was used to amplify similar sequences in banana. A fragment of approximately 550 bp was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis of several clones revealed 13 distinct sequences highly similar to STKs. Based on their significant similarity with the tomato Pto protein (BLASTX E value <3e-53), seven of them were classified as Pto resistance gene candidates (Pto-RGCs). Multiple sequence alignment of the banana Pto-RGC products revealed that these sequences contain several conserved subdomains present in most STKs and also several conserved residues that are crucial for Pto function. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed that the banana Pto-RGCs were clustered with Pto suggesting a common evolutionary origin with this R gene. The Pto-RGCs isolated in this study represent a valuable sequence resource that could assist in the development of disease resistance in banana.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00438-007-0262-9DOI Listing
October 2007