Publications by authors named "Andrew H Gutwein"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Predictors of vertigo in the emergency department: The preved study.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2020 Sep 25;29(9):105043. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

NYC Health+Hospitals/Jacobi, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: Acute vertigo (sense of motion) can be the sole manifestation of a posterior circulation stroke, and often gets missed in the emergency department (ED). The studies for evaluation of central vertigo have focused on physical exam findings, which require expertise and may not be suitable for rapid triage by a nurse in ED or by paramedics.

Methods: This cross sectional study included retrospective chart review of patients 18 years of age and older who presented to the Adult ED with acute dizziness or vertigo during the calendar year 2017. All the patients with a diagnosis of central or peripheral vertigo were included in the final analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, Likelihood Ratio of positive result (LR (+)) and Likelihood Ratio of negative result (LR (-)) for central and peripheral vertigo were calculated for risk factors, symptoms and physical examination features. Chi-squared test and univariate logistic regression were used to evaluate statistical correlation and to calculate the prevalence odds ratio (POR).

Results: Two hundred and forty nine out of 505 (49.3%) patients presenting with dizziness had vertigo. Of these, 14 had central vertigo and 163 had peripheral vertigo. Statistically significant variables were: constant symptoms of vertigo (p 0.000- POR 8.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-33.1), no change in symptoms with head movement (p 0.000- POR 10.2, 95% CI 3.0-35.4), dysmetria (p 0.000- POR 56.8, 95% CI 5.8-557.1), and unsteady gait (p 0.000- POR 13.3, 95% CI 3.3-54.3). The sensitivity and specificity to detect central vertigo were 100% and 66.4% respectively if the patient had either unsteady gait, constant symptoms, or no change in symptoms with head movement, [VAIN triad (Vertigo- Ataxia, Incessant, or Non-positional)].

Conclusions: We suggest that triage with VAIN triad can be used to design prospective studies to develop a triage algorithm for the detection of central vertigo in the ED.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2020.105043DOI Listing
September 2020

Implementation of a Low-Cost Quality Improvement Intervention Increases Adherence to Cancer Screening Guidelines and Reduces Healthcare Costs at a University Medical Center.

J Cancer Educ 2020 10;35(5):930-936

University of Arizona Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Adherence to US Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) cancer screening guidelines remains considerably lower than the recommendation of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. Patient populations recommended for screening are not screened at an appropriate rate, and populations not recommended for screening are inappropriately screened. Closer adherence to guidelines should improve outcomes and reduce costs, estimated to reach $158 billion/year by 2020. We evaluated whether a use of low-cost educational health maintenance (HM) card by medical residents at a university hospital could impact education and adherence to updated cancer screening guidelines. We also analyzed savings to the healthcare system. Adherence to cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening guidelines, defined as percentage that was screened (or not screened) in accordance with the USPSTF guidelines, in clinic visits from December 2012 (n = 336) was compared to those from December 2013 (n = 306) after a quality improvement intervention. Post-intervention, adherence to screening guidelines increased by 40.8% (p < 0.01) for cervical, 33.2% (p < 0.01) for breast, and 20.5% (p < 0.01) for colorectal cancer in average-risk patients. Inappropriate screening was reduced by 26.8% (p < 0.01) for cervical and 32.8% (p < 0.01) for breast cancer. A non-significant 1.1% decrease (p = 0.829) was observed for colorectal cancer. The annual potential savings from avoiding inappropriate screenings were $998,316 (95% CI; $644,484-$1,352,148). We showed a significant absolute increase in USPSTF knowledge of 28.3% irrespective of the house staff level that remained high at 2 years from the educational intervention. The low-cost HM card increased appropriate knowledgeable cancer screening adherence while reducing unnecessary testing and producing substantial savings to the healthcare system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-019-01544-zDOI Listing
October 2020

Prevalence of inappropriate use of digoxin in 136 patients on digoxin and prevalence of use of warfarin or aspirin in 89 patients with persistent or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

Am J Ther 2009 Nov-Dec;16(6):e41-3

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA.

Of 136 patients, mean age 72 years, receiving digoxin in the hospital or in the medical clinic, 47 (35%) had heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and symptoms despite optimal medical therapy, 82 (60%) had persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), and 7 (5%) had paroxysmal AF. The prevalence of inappropriate use of digoxin was 5%. Of 89 patients with persistent or paroxysmal AF, 70 (79%) were being treated with warfarin to maintain an International Normalized Ratio between 2.0 and 3.0, 15 (17%) were being treated with aspirin 325 mg daily, and 4 (4%) were not being treated with warfarin or aspirin. The prevalence of nonuse of warfarin or aspirin in patients with persistent or paroxysmal AF was 4%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MJT.0b013e31816b8fecDOI Listing
February 2010

Prevalence of appropriate management of diabetes mellitus in an academic general medicine clinic.

Am J Ther 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):42-5

Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, 10595, USA.

Because diabetes mellitus was not being adequately treated according to guidelines in an academic general medicine clinic, 2 of the authors (W.S.A. and A.H.G.) instituted an educational program to see if we could improve the appropriate management of diabetes mellitus in the academic general medicine clinic. Following this educational program, we investigated the appropriate management of 196 unselected patients with diabetes mellitus, mean age 61 years, who were followed up for at least 1 year in an academic general medicine clinic. The blood pressure was reduced to <130/80 mm Hg in 161 of 196 diabetics (82%). The hemoglobin A1c was reduced to <7.0% in 134 of 196 diabetics (68%). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers were used to treat 50 of 51 diabetics (98%) with coronary artery disease (CAD), ischemic stroke, or peripheral arterial disease; 33 of 35 diabetics (94%) with a glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m; 54 of 57 diabetics (94%) with microalbuminuria, and 21 of 22 diabetics (96%) with electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy. Aspirin was used to treat 50 of 51 diabetics (98%) with CAD, ischemic stroke, or peripheral arterial disease. beta-Blockers were used to treat 36 of 39 diabetics (92%) with CAD. Statins were used to treat 168 of 196 diabetics (86%). Smoking cessation counseling was documented in 39 of 53 smokers (74%). Of 196 diabetics, 196 (100%) had a neurological examination, 129 (66%) were referred to an ophthalmologist for an eye examination, and 125 (64%) were referred to a podiatrist for foot care. These data show that an educational program on the appropriate management of diabetes mellitus improved the management of diabetes mellitus in an academic general medicine clinic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MJT.0b013e3181822e78DOI Listing
March 2010

Prevalence of influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination in elderly and high-risk patients seen in a university general medicine clinic.

Am J Ther 2008 Nov-Dec;15(6):528-30

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA.

Charts of 240 unselected patients (149 women and 91 men), mean age 74 +/- 7 years (range, 64-95 years), seen in a university general medicine clinic at Westchester Medical Center/New York Medical College between April 2004 and April 2007 were reviewed for the use of influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination. Of the 240 patients, 108 (45%) had cardiovascular disease, 183 (76%) had hypertension, 70 (29%) had diabetes mellitus, 32 (13%) had chronic pulmonary disease, 30 (13%) had cancer, 26 (11%) had chronic renal disease, and 19 (8%) had no chronic illness. Of the 240 patients, 24 (10%) refused influenza vaccination and two (1%) had a hypersensitivity to eggs. Of 240 patients, 18 (8%) refused pneumococcal vaccination. Of 94 patients who did not refuse influenza vaccination or were allergic to eggs during the winter season of October 2004 through January 2005, 58 (62%) had influenza vaccination. Ninety-two of 172 patients (54%) had influenza vaccination during October 2005 through January 2006. Ninety-seven of 136 patients (71%) had influenza vaccination during October 2006 through January 2007. Of 222 patients, 111 (50%) had pneumococcal vaccination during 2004 through 2007.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MJT.0b013e3181400114DOI Listing
March 2009