Publications by authors named "Andrew Bergman"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The noncoding MIR100HG RNA enhances the autocrine function of transforming growth factor β signaling.

Oncogene 2021 May 4;40(21):3748-3765. Epub 2021 May 4.

Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Box 582, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Activation of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway modulates the expression of genes involved in cell growth arrest, motility, and embryogenesis. An expression screen for long noncoding RNAs indicated that TGFβ induced mir-100-let-7a-2-mir-125b-1 cluster host gene (MIR100HG) expression in diverse cancer types, thus confirming an earlier demonstration of TGFβ-mediated transcriptional induction of MIR100HG in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. MIR100HG depletion attenuated TGFβ signaling, expression of TGFβ-target genes, and TGFβ-mediated cell cycle arrest. Moreover, MIR100HG silencing inhibited both normal and cancer cell motility and enhanced the cytotoxicity of cytostatic drugs. MIR100HG overexpression had an inverse impact on TGFβ signaling responses. Screening for downstream effectors of MIR100HG identified the ligand TGFβ1. MIR100HG and TGFB1 mRNA formed ribonucleoprotein complexes with the RNA-binding protein HuR, promoting TGFβ1 cytokine secretion. In addition, TGFβ regulated let-7a-2-3p, miR-125b-5p, and miR-125b-1-3p expression, all encoded by MIR100HG intron-3. Certain intron-3 miRNAs may be involved in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated responses (let-7a-2-3p) and others (miR-100, miR-125b) in resistance to cytotoxic drugs mediated by MIR100HG. In support of a model whereby TGFβ induces MIR100HG, which then enhances TGFβ1 secretion, analysis of human carcinomas showed that MIR100HG expression correlated with expression of TGFB1 and its downstream extracellular target TGFBI. Thus, MIR100HG controls the magnitude of TGFβ signaling via TGFβ1 autoinduction and secretion in carcinomas.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41388-021-01803-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8154591PMC
May 2021

Using automated health plan data to assess infection risk from coronary artery bypass surgery.

Emerg Infect Dis 2002 Dec;8(12):1433-41

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Eastern Massachusetts Prevention Epicenter, Boston, USA.

We determined if infection indicators were sufficiently consistent across health plans to allow comparison of hospitals' risks of infection after coronary artery bypass surgery. Three managed care organizations accounted for 90% of managed care in eastern Massachusetts, from October 1996 through March 1999. We searched their automated inpatient and outpatient claims and outpatient pharmacy dispensing files for indicator codes suggestive of postoperative surgical site infection. We reviewed full text medical records of patients with indicator codes to confirm infection status. We compared the hospital-specific proportions of cases with an indicator code, adjusting for health plan, age, sex, and chronic disease score. A total of 536 (27%) of 1,953 patients had infection indicators. Infection was confirmed in 79 (53%) of 149 reviewed records with adequate documentation. The proportion of patients with an indicator of infection varied significantly (p < 0.001) between hospitals (19% to 36%) and health plans (22% to 33%). The difference between hospitals persisted after adjustment for health plan and patients' age and sex. Similar relationships were observed when postoperative antibiotic information was ignored. Automated claims and pharmacy data from different health plans can be used together to allow inexpensive, routine monitoring of indicators of postoperative infection, with the goal of identifying institutions that can be further evaluated to determine if risks for infection can be reduced.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2737830PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid0812.020039DOI Listing
December 2002