Publications by authors named "Andrei A Belimov"

4 Publications

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A chemically induced new pea (Pisum sativum) mutant SGECdt with increased tolerance to, and accumulation of, cadmium.

Ann Bot 2007 Feb;99(2):227-37

All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology, Podbelskogo 3, Pushkin 8, 196608, St Petersburg, Russian Federation.

Background And Aims: To date, there are no crop mutants described in the literature that display both Cd accumulation and tolerance. In the present study a unique pea (Pisum sativum) mutant SGECd(t) with increased Cd tolerance and accumulation was isolated and characterized.

Methods: Ethylmethane sulfonate mutagenesis of the pea line SGE was used to obtain the mutant. Screening for Cd-tolerant seedlings in the M2 generation was performed using hydroponics in the presence of 6 microm CdCl2. Hybridological analysis was used to identify the inheritance of the mutant phenotype. Several physiological and biochemical characteristics of SGECd(t) were studied in hydroponic experiments in the presence of 3 microm CdCl2, and elemental analysis was conducted.

Key Results: The mutant SGECd(t) was characterized as having a monogenic inheritance and a recessive phenotype. It showed increased Cd concentrations in roots and shoots but no obvious morphological defects, demonstrating its capability to cope well with increased Cd levels in its tissues. The enhanced Cd accumulation in the mutant was accompanied by maintenance of homeostasis of shoot Ca, Mg, Zn and Mn contents, and root Ca and Mg contents. Through the application of La(+3) and the exclusion of Ca from the nutrient solution, maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in Cd-stressed SGECd(t) was shown to contribute to the increased Cd tolerance. Control plants of the mutant (i.e. no Cd treatment) had elevated concentrations of glutathione (GSH) in the roots. Through measurements of chitinase and guaiacol-dependent peroxidase activities, as well as proline and non-protein thiol (NPT) levels, it was shown that there were lower levels of Cd stress both in roots and shoots of SGECd(t). Accumulation of phytochelatins [(PCcalculated) = (NPT)-(GSH)] could be excluded as a cause of the increased Cd tolerance in the mutant.

Conclusions: The SGECd(t) mutant represents a novel and unique model to study adaptation of plants to toxic heavy metal concentrations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcl261DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2802999PMC
February 2007

Genotypic variation of the response to cadmium toxicity in Pisum sativum L.

J Exp Bot 2005 Jan 8;56(409):167-78. Epub 2004 Nov 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants W5, University of Bielefeld, University Str. 25, D-33501, Bielefeld, Germany.

This work evaluates the (cor-)relations between selected biochemical responses to toxic Cd and the degree of Cd sensitivity in a set of pea genotypes. Ten genotypes were analysed that differ in their growth response to Cd when expressed as root or shoot tolerance indices (TIs). Concentrations of non-protein thiols (NPTs) and malondialdehyde (MDA), activity of chitinase, peroxidase (POX), and catalase significantly increased in all pea genotypes treated with Cd. Cd-sensitivity of genotypes was correlated with relative increases in MDA concentration as well as activities of chitinase and POX, suggesting similar Cd stress effects. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) decreased, but concentrations of glutathione (GSH) increased in the less Cd-sensitive genotypes. Differences in root and leaf contents of Cd revealed no correlation with TI, metabolic parameters, and enzyme activities in Cd-treated plants, respectively, except that shoot Cd concentration positively correlated with shoot chitinase activity. Toxic Cd levels inhibited uptake of nutrient elements such as P, K, S, Ca, Zn, Mn, and B by plants in an organ- and genotype-specific manner. Cd-sensitivity was significantly correlated with decreased root Zn concentrations. The results show both similarities, as well as distinct features, in Cd toxicity expression in genotypes of one species, suggesting that independent and multi-factorial reactions modulate Cd sensitivity on the low-tolerance level of plants. The study illustrates the biochemical basis of earlier detected genotypic variation in Cd response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/eri017DOI Listing
January 2005

Response of spring rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera L.) to inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase depends on nutrient status of the plant.

Can J Microbiol 2002 Mar;48(3):189-99

Laboratory of Ecology of Symbiotic and Associative Bacteria, All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology, Saint Petersburg.

Responses of rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera L.) to inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, Pseudomonas putida Am2, Pseudomonas putida Bm3, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans Cm4, and Pseudomonas sp. Dp2, containing 1-aminocyclopropane-l-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase were studied using growth pouch and soil cultures. In growth pouch culture, the bacteria significantly increased root elongation of phosphorus-sufficient seedlings, whereas root elongation of phosphorus-deficient seedlings was not affected or was even inhibited by the bacteria. Bacterial stimulation of root elongation of phosphorus-sufficient seedlings was eliminated in the presence of a high ammonia concentration (1 mM) in the nutrient solution. Bacterial effects on root elongation of potassium-deficient and potassium-sufficient seedlings were similar. The bacteria also decreased inorganic phosphate content in shoots of potassium- and phosphorus-sufficient seedlings, reduced ethylene production by phosphorus-sufficient seedlings, and inhibited development of root hairs. The effects of treatment with Ag+, a chemical inhibitor of plant ethylene production, on root elongation, ethylene evolution, and root hair formation were similar to bacterial treatments. The number of bacteria on the roots of phosphorus-deficient seedlings was not limited by phosphorus deficiency. In pot experiments with soil culture, inoculation of seeds with bacteria and treatment with aminoethoxyvinylglycine, an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis in plants, increased root and (or) shoot biomass of rape plants. Stimulation of plant growth caused by the bacteria was often associated with a decrease in the content of nutrients, such as P, K, S, Mo, and Ba, in shoots, depending on the strain used. The results obtained show that the growth-promoting effects of ACC-utilizing rhizobacteria depend significantly on the nutrient status of the plant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/w02-007DOI Listing
March 2002

Cadmium accumulation and buffering of cadmium-induced stress by arbuscular mycorrhiza in three Pisum sativum L. genotypes.

J Exp Bot 2002 May;53(371):1177-85

UMR 1088 INRA/Université de Bourgogne, BBCE-IPM, INRA-CMSE, BP 86510 21065 Dijon Cédex, France.

The role of arbuscular mycorrhiza in reducing Cd stress was investigated in three genotypes of Pisum sativum L. (cv. Frisson, VIR4788, VIR7128), grown in soil/sand pot cultures in the presence and absence of 2-3 mg kg(-1) bioavailable Cd, and inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. Shoot, root and pod biomass were decreased by Cd in non-mycorrhizal plants. The presence of mycorrhiza attenuated the negative effect of Cd so that shoot biomass and activity of photosystem II, based on chlorophyll a fluorescence, were not significantly different between mycorrhizal plants growing in the presence or absence of the heavy metal (HM). Total P concentrations were not significantly different between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants treated with Cd. From 20-50-fold more Cd accumulated in roots than in shoots of Cd-treated plants, and overall levels were comparable to other metal-accumulating plants. Genetic variability in Cd accumulation existed between the pea genotypes. Concentration of the HM was lowest in roots of VIR4788 and in pods of VIR4788 and VIR7128. G. intraradices inoculation decreased Cd accumulation in roots and pods of cv. Frisson, whilst high concentrations were maintained in roots and pods of mycorrhizal VIR7128. Shoot concentrations of Cd increased in mycorrhizal cv. Frisson and VIR4788. Sequestration of Cd in root cell walls and/or cytoplasm, measured by EDS/SEM, was comparable between non-mycorrhizal pea genotypes but considerably decreased in mycorrhizal cv. Frisson and VIR7128. Possible mechanisms for mycorrhiza buffering of Cd-induced stress in the pea genotypes are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jexbot/53.371.1177DOI Listing
May 2002
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