Publications by authors named "Andrea Borenich"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Low prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in vegetarians.

Indian J Gastroenterol 2021 Apr 12. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 15, 8036, Graz, Austria.

Background: Dietary modification could reduce the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Circumstantial evidence suggests that gastroesophageal reflux is less prevalent in people adhering to a vegetarian diet. We aimed to study the relationship between vegetarianism and the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS).

Methods: This study compares the prevalence of GERS in vegetarians with non-vegetarian controls from the general population. Frequency and severity of GERS (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) were assessed with a self-administrated questionnaire.

Results: Within 1 year, any GERS were experienced by 19 of 100 (19%) vegetarians and by 98 of 250 (39.2%) non-vegetarian controls (p < 0.001). Frequent GERS, defined as GERS on at least 1 day per week, were noted in 3% of vegetarians and in 12.8% of controls (p = 0.006). Reflux symptoms were significantly less severe in vegetarians than in non-vegetarians (p < 0.001). According to multivariable analysis, independent predictors of GERS included male sex, current smoking, BMI ≥ 25 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-3.31), and a non-vegetarian diet (OR = 2.19; 95% CI, 1.20-3.97); non-vegetarian diet independently predicted frequent GERS (OR 4.03; 95% CI, 1.17-13.9). An increased risk of GERS (OR = 2.17; 95% CI, 1.09-4.29) and frequent GERS (OR 4.00; 95% CI, 1.13-14.18) in non-vegetarians were also demonstrated by logistic regression of matched data. In non-vegetarians, the risk of reflux symptoms was not significantly related to meat intake.

Conclusions: The prevalence and severity of GERS are lower in vegetarians than in non-vegetarians from the general population. The results are in line with a mitigating effect of vegetarianism on GERS. Data must be interpreted with caution given the retrospective study design and the small sample size.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12664-021-01156-wDOI Listing
April 2021

A Profound Basic Characterization of eIFs in Gliomas: Identifying eIF3I and 4H as Potential Novel Target Candidates in Glioma Therapy.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Mar 23;13(6). Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Diagnostic & Research Center for Molecular BioMedicine, Department of Neuropathology, Diagnostic and Research Institute of Pathology, Medical University Graz, Neue Stiftingtalstrasse 6, 8010 Graz, Austria.

Glioblastoma (GBM) is an utterly devastating cerebral neoplasm and current therapies only marginally improve patients' overall survival (OS). The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway participates in gliomagenesis through regulation of cell growth and proliferation. Since it is an upstream regulator of the rate-limiting translation initiation step of protein synthesis, controlled by eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs), we aimed for a profound basic characterization of 17 eIFs to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for gliomas. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed expressions of mTOR-related proteins and eIFs in human astrocytoma samples (WHO grades I-IV) and compared them to non-neoplastic cortical control brain tissue (CCBT) using immunoblot analyses and immunohistochemistry. We examined mRNA expression using qRT-PCR and additionally performed in silico analyses to observe the influence of eIFs on patients' survival. Protein and mRNA expressions of eIF3B, eIF3I, eIF4A1, eIF4H, eIF5 and eIF6 were significantly increased in high grade gliomas compared to CCBT and partially in low grade gliomas. However, short OS was only associated with high eIF3I gene expression in low grade gliomas, but not in GBM. In GBM, high eIF4H gene expression significantly correlated with shorter patient survival. In conclusion, we identified eIF3I and eIF4H as the most promising targets for future therapy for glioma patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13061482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8004965PMC
March 2021

Implementation status of morbidity and mortality conferences in Austrian hospitals-A cross-sectional national survey study.

PLoS One 2021 17;16(3):e0248692. Epub 2021 Mar 17.

Research Unit for Safety in Health, c/o Division of Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Introduction: Morbidity and mortality conferences (M&MCs) are an instrument for learning from past complications, unexpected follow-ups and deaths in hospitals and are important for improving patient safety. However, there are currently no quantitative data on the implementation of M&MCs in Austria. The aim of the study was to determine the status quo of the M&MCs in Austria.

Materials And Methods: A national cross-sectional study was conducted by means of a survey of 982 chief physicians of surgical disciplines, internal medicine, anesthesiology, intensive care, gynecology/obstetrics and pediatrics. The questionnaire focused on overall goals, structure and procedures of hospital M&MCs.

Results: Of the 982 contacted chief physicians, 314 (32.0%) completed the survey. Almost two thirds of the respondents, i.e. 203 (64.7%), had already implemented M&MCs. Of the 111 chief physicians who had not yet introduced M&MCs, 62 (55.9%) were interested in introducing such conferences in the future. Of the 203 respondents that had implemented M&MCs, 100 stated that their M&MC could be improved. They reported issues with "shame and blame" culture, hierarchical structures, too little knowledge about the capability of M&MC and, in particular, time constraints. Overall, the participating chief physicians showed that they are striving to improve their existing M&MCs.

Discussion/conclusion: While we found a relatively high number of already implemented M&MCs we also identified a large heterogeneity in the format of the M&MCs. A highly structured M&MC including guidelines, checklists or templates does not only considerably improve its outcome but can also alleviate the main limiting factor which is the lack of time.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0248692PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7968694PMC
March 2021

Obesity Affects HDL Metabolism, Composition and Subclass Distribution.

Biomedicines 2021 Feb 27;9(3). Epub 2021 Feb 27.

Division of Pharmacology, Otto Loewi Research Center, Medical University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 4, 8010 Graz, Austria.

Background: Obesity increases the risk of coronary heart disease, partly due to its strong association with atherogenic dyslipidemia, characterized by high triglycerides and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. Functional impairment of HDL may contribute to the increased cardiovascular mortality, but the effect of obesity on composition, structure, and function of HDL is not well understood Design and Methods: We determined HDL composition, HDL subclass distribution, parameters of HDL function, and activities of most important enzymes involved in lipoprotein remodeling, including lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in relatively young normal weight ( = 26), overweight ( = 22), and obese ( = 20) women.

Results: Obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30) was associated with noticeable changes in LCAT and CETP activities and altered HDL composition, such as decreased apolipoprotein A-I, cholesterol, and phospholipid content, while pro-inflammatory HDL serum amyloid a content was increased. We observed a marked shift towards smaller HDL subclasses in obesity linked to lower anti-oxidative capacity of serum. LCAT activity, HDL subclass distribution, and HDL-cholesterol were associated with soluble leptin receptor, adiponectin, and liver enzyme activities. Of note, most of these alterations were only seen in obese women but not in overweight women.

Conclusions: Obesity markedly affects HDL metabolism, composition, and subclass distribution linked to changes in liver and adipose tissue. HDL dysfunction may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk in obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9030242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7997277PMC
February 2021

Heart Rate Performance Curve Is Dependent on Age, Sex, and Performance.

Front Public Health 2020 2;8:98. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Exercise Physiology, Training & Training Therapy Research Group, Institute of Sports Science, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

The Heart Rate Performance Curve (HRPC) is neither linear nor uniform and related to ß1-adrenoceptor sensitivity. As aging and exercise influence ß1-adrenoceptors we suggested age, sex and performance effects on the HRPC. Aim of the study was to examine the effects of aging on the deflection of the HRPC in maximal incremental cycle ergometer exercise (CE) in a large cohort of healthy subjects. Heart rate (HR) data of 2,980 men (51 ± 15 years) and 1,944 women (52 ± 14 years) were classified into age groups (≤20 up to >80 years). We analyzed age and performance (P 25%-quartile and P 75%-quartile of age predicted power) effects on HR and on the degree () and the type (regular downward deflection > 0.1, linear -0.1 ≤ ≤ 0.1 and atypical upward deflection < -0.1) of the HRPC. -values decreased significantly with age in men and women and were significantly higher in women. Atypical HRPC's increased by a linear trend from ≤20 to 70 years () respectively 80 years () from 10 to 43% () and 9 to 30% (). HR of all age groups was lower in P and overall number of atypical HRPC's was 21% () and 16% () higher compared to P. Aging increased the number of atypical HRPC's with upward deflection in CE tests, which influences exercise intensity prescription especially when using fixed percentages of HR. Changes in HRPC's were affected by sex and performance, where women generally and subjects with higher performance presented less atypical HRPC's even at older age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2020.00098DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7144539PMC
April 2020