Publications by authors named "Andre Manfred Willasch"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Myeloablative conditioning for allo-HSCT in pediatric ALL: FTBI or chemotherapy?-A multicenter EBMT-PDWP study.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2020 08 17;55(8):1540-1551. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Division for Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunology, Department for Children and Adolescents, University Hospital, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.

Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receive fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI) as myeloablative conditioning (MAC) for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), it is an important matter of debate if chemotherapy can effectively replace FTBI. To compare outcomes after FTBI versus chemotherapy-based conditioning (CC), we performed a retrospective EBMT registry study. Children aged 2-18 years after MAC for first allo-HSCT of bone marrow (BM) or peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from matched-related (MRD) or unrelated donors (UD) in first (CR1) or second remission (CR2) between 2000 and 2012 were included. Propensity score weighting was used to control pretreatment imbalances of the observed variables. 3.054 patients were analyzed. CR1 (1.498): median follow-up (FU) after FTBI (1.285) and CC (213) was 6.8 and 6.1 years. Survivals were not significantly different. CR2 (1.556): median FU after FTBI (1.345) and CC (211) was 6.2 years. Outcomes after FTBI were superior as compared with CC with regard to overall survival (OS), leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse incidence (RI), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). However, we must emphasize the preliminary character of the results of this retrospective "real-world-practice" study. These findings will be prospectively assessed in the ALL SCTped 2012 FORUM trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-020-0854-0DOI Listing
August 2020

AlloHSCT in paediatric ALL and AML in complete remission: improvement over time impacted by accreditation?

Bone Marrow Transplant 2019 05 26;54(5):737-745. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Division for Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunology, Department for Children and Adolescents, University Hospital, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) has become a well-established treatment option for many patients suffering from malignant and non-malignant diseases. In the past decade, high-resolution HLA-typing, remission surveillance, pre-emptive immune intervention, and standardisation in supportive care measures have substantially improved transplant outcomes. This retrospective study evaluated transplant procedures in 162 paediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 124) or acute myeloid leukaemia (n = 38) who received their first alloHSCT in our institution over an 11-year period. We observed a significant reduction in risk of non-relapse mortality (NRM) over time (HR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.12-0.98; P = 0.05), the 4-year NRM estimate decreased from 20% in 2005-2008 to 7% in 2012-2016 (P = 0.02) and an increase in survival after relapse. There was no significant difference in patients who received a graft from a sibling, haplo, or an unrelated donor with regard to their overall survival (P = 0.45), event-free survival (P = 0.61), and non-relapse mortality (P = 0.19). Our data suggest that a specific transplant infrastructure with a highly experienced team in an accredited transplant centre likely contributes to better transplant outcomes for acute leukaemia patients in complete remission regardless of donor type.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-018-0341-zDOI Listing
May 2019

Epidemiology, risk factors, and prognosis of capillary leak syndrome in pediatric recipients of stem cell transplants: a retrospective single-center cohort study.

Pediatr Transplant 2016 Dec 13;20(8):1132-1136. Epub 2016 Oct 13.

Division for Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunology, Department for Children and Adolescents, University Hospital, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

CLS involves sudden loss of intravascular fluids into the interstitial spaces. CLS was described as a possible complication after SCT. Few studies report the incidence of CLS in pediatric populations. We aimed to assess CLS incidence, its risk factors, and impact on the survival. The clinical charts of patients <18 years of age transplanted at our institution between 2002 and 2012 were reviewed. CLS was defined by weight gain >3% in 24 hours and positive intake balance despite furosemide administration. In total, 234 patients underwent 275 allogeneic SCT procedures in the analyzed time frame. Fifteen patients developed CLS (5.4%). The probability of developing CLS was significantly increased in patients suffering from sepsis (14.3% vs 0.6%, P<.001). Patients with CLS exhibited an increased risk of acute GvHD in the first 30 days after SCT (10.8% vs 1.8%, P=.002). Ten of the patients with CLS required intensive care. CLS strongly impacts OS at day +100 after SCT and is a predictive factor of TRM at the same date (42.9% vs 5%, P<.0001). The biological relation among sepsis, GvHD, and CLS development in terms of cytokine release and endothelial damage warrants further studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/petr.12831DOI Listing
December 2016

Prediction model for the incidence and prevalence of type 1 diabetes in childhood and adolescence: evidence for a cohort-dependent increase within the next two decades in Germany.

Pediatr Diabetes 2012 Feb 3;13(1):15-20. Epub 2011 Aug 3.

Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Children's Hospital, Tuebingen, Germany.

Objective: To provide data on type 1 diabetes (T1D) epidemiology in childhood over a period of 20 years and to predict prevalence and cohort-age-specific incidence rates (IRs) for the next two decades in Germany.

Methods: The Baden-Wuerttemberg Diabetes Incidence Registry (DIARY) includes children and adolescents below 15 years of age with new onset of T1D (period 1987-2006, n = 5108 cases).

Results: The mean age- and sex-standardized IR was 15.3/100 000/year (95% CI 14.8-15.7) and the average increase in the IR was 4.4% per year (95% CI 3.9-4.9). Within the next 20 years (2007-2026), the risk for developing diabetes will increase like the square of a linear function with calendar year for all age ranges. There is a strong correlation between the predicted IRs of the cohorts and the observed IRs (n = 300; root mean square error = 0.56; r(2) = 0.71) and a negative correlation between mean age at onset and T1D IR (p = 0.02). On 31 December 2006, the prevalence of T1D was 0.126% (95% CI 0.121-0.132). The predicted prevalence (end of 2026) is estimated to be 0.265% (95% CI 0.25-0.28; predicted cases: n = 2950; 95% CI 2900-3000).

Conclusions: In comparison to observations made in the past, the risk of disease rises even faster than expected: The younger the child, the quicker the increase of the cohort-age-specific IR and the higher the risk for T1D during lifetime.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-5448.2011.00799.xDOI Listing
February 2012