Publications by authors named "André Gustavo Pereira de Andrade"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Asymmetric velocity profiles in Paralympic powerlifters performing at different exercise intensities are detected by functional data analysis.

J Biomech 2021 May 15;123:110523. Epub 2021 May 15.

School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil; Brazilian Paralympic Reference Center, Sports Training Center, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Electronic address:

Asymmetries compromise performance in powerlifting and Paralympic powerlifting, but its quantification can be complex. Previous studies consider average or peak values to quantify asymmetries, however this approach does not consider the pattern of movement like velocity profiles. Here we demonstrate that conducting a functional analysis of variance (FANOVA) permits to quantify asymmetries in bench press performance by Paralympic powerlifting at different submaximal intensities. Kinematic data were collected from 10 Paralympic powerlifting athletes performing in bench press at submaximal intensities (50% and 90% of the one-repetition maximum). Linear velocity was quantified considering mean values and the entire waveform. Mean values were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the waveforms were compared by FANOVA. FANOVA identified asymmetry profiles that ANOVA did not recognize at the highest intensity, which is the closest to a competition. This way, FANOVA can bring advantages to the analysis of competitive performance. FANOVA data analysis identifies asymmetries at higher intensity of effort considering the whole pattern of movement. Therefore, we consider that the FANOVA's approach may benefit the biomechanical assessment of the Paralympic powerlifting.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2021.110523DOI Listing
May 2021

Functional data analysis reveals asymmetrical crank torque during cycling performed at different exercise intensities.

J Biomech 2021 Jun 24;122:110478. Epub 2021 Apr 24.

Biomechanics Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Electronic address:

Pedaling asymmetry is claimed as a factor of influence on injury and performance. However, the evidence is still controversial. Most previous studies determined peak torque asymmetries, which in our understanding does not consider the pattern of movement like torque profiles. Here we demonstrate that asymmetries in pedaling torque at different exercise intensities can be better described when the torque profiles are considered using functional analysis of variance than when only the peak values are analyzed. We compared peak torques and torque curves recorded while cyclists pedaled at submaximal intensities of 60%, 80%, and 95% of the maximal power output and compared data between the preferred and non-preferred legs. ANOVA showed symmetry or rather no difference in the amount of peak torque between legs, regardless of pedaling intensity. FANOVA, on the other hand, revealed significant asymmetries between legs, regardless of cycling intensity, apparently for different sections of the cycle, however, not for peak torque, either. We conclude that pedaling asymmetry cannot be quantified solely by peak torques and considering the analysis of the entire movement cycle can more accurately reflect the biomechanical movement pattern. Therefore, FANOVA data analysis could be an alternative to identify asymmetries. A novel approach as described here might be useful when combining kinetics assessment with other approaches like EMG and kinematics and help to better understand the role of pedaling asymmetries for performance and injury risks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2021.110478DOI Listing
June 2021

Correlation between running asymmetry, mechanical efficiency, and performance during a 10 km run.

J Biomech 2020 08 1;109:109913. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Biomechanics Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Electronic address:

Running asymmetry is considered a matter of concern for performance and injury, but the association between asymmetry and performance remain unclear. There are different strategies to address asymmetries and its relationship with performance. Here we investigated the correlation between global symmetry index and mechanical efficiency during 10 km running. Thirteen amateur trained athletes (8 men and 5 women) performed a 10 km running at a fixed pace while a 3D accelerometer attached to the pelvic region recorded position data throughout the course of the run and gas exchanges were monitored breath by breath. Global symmetry index was determined for 3 directions, and mechanical efficiency was calculated as the ratio of external work output to energy expenditure determined from gas analysis. Global Symmetry Index and mechanical efficiency decreased (-55.5% and -44.8%, respectively) during the course of the 10 km run (p < 0.01). A positive correlation was observed between global symmetry index and efficiency (r = 0.66, p = 0.01). Asymmetry in the vertical direction had a relatively higher impact on the global symmetry index. The global symmetry index accounted for 43.1% of the variance in mechanical efficiency (p = 0.015). Symmetry, evaluated by the global symmetry index, directly correlates with mechanical efficiency during a 10 km run.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2020.109913DOI Listing
August 2020

The Effects of Altering the Concentric/Eccentric Phase Times on EMG Response, Lactate Accumulation and Work Completed When Training to Failure.

J Hum Kinet 2020 Jul 21;73:33-44. Epub 2020 Jul 21.

Weight Training Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

This study compared the electromyographic response, the blood lactate concentration (BLC), and the maximum number of repetitions (MNR) between protocols of different concentric/eccentric duration taken to muscle failure. This comparison may help to understand how different concentric/eccentric duration may influence performance and the central and metabolic responses in trained men. Seventeen strength-trained men performed two protocols in a counterbalanced design. Three sets of the Smith bench press exercise were performed to failure at 60% of the one-repetition maximum (1RM) using each protocol (4-s concentric/2-s eccentric [4 s: 2 s]; and 2-s concentric/4-s eccentric [2 s: 4 s]). The normalized root mean square (EMGRMS) and the mean frequency (EMGMF) of the electromyographic signals for the pectoralis major and the triceps brachii were compared in the first, middle, and last repetitions. The BLC was assessed at rest, during and after the test sessions. To compare the EMG and BLC, a 3-way ANOVA with repeated measures with a post hoc Tukey's test was used. To compare the MNR performed across the sets, an ANOVA-type rank test with the Dunn's post hoc test was used. The ANOVA indicated a greater EMGRMS for Protocol 4 s: 2 s in the pectoralis major and a lower EMGMF for Protocol 4 s: 2 s in the triceps brachii at the middle and last repetitions. Both protocols increased the EMGRMS and decreased the EMGMF across repetitions. Despite the results show different levels of activation and neuromuscular fatigue between protocols, the BLC and the MNR were similar.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2019-0132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7386151PMC
July 2020

TDCS of the Primary Motor Cortex: Learning the Absolute Dimension of a Complex Motor Task.

J Mot Behav 2021 13;53(4):431-444. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

The primary motor cortex (M1) is one of the main cortical areas involved in motor learning. However, little is known about its differential role in the learning of the relative and absolute dimensions of motor skills. We investigated the role of M1 in the learning of the dimensions of a complex motor skill. Forty-eight participants practiced golf putting and were stimulated for 20 minutes with real or sham bihemispheric tDCS before acquisition. tDCS improved global performance from pre- to post-test. Only those with worse initial performance who were stimulated by tDCS showed a significant improvement in the skill's absolute dimension. No effects of tDCS were found for the relative dimension. Our results suggest that M1 has a distinct participation in the learning of the absolute dimension of complex motor skills, and tDCS effects are influenced by the learner's level of initial performance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00222895.2020.1792823DOI Listing
July 2020

Understanding Player Load: Meanings and Limitations.

J Hum Kinet 2020 Jan 31;71:5-9. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Laboratory of Biomechanics - Department of Sports, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Federal University of Minas Gerais), Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

We present a critical reflection on the mechanical variable Player Load, which is based on acceleration data and commonly used in sports. Our motivation to write this paper came from the difficulties that we encountered in the calculation and interpretation of Player Load using our own data, since we did not use the Catapult Sports equipment, which is a merchandise of the company that proposed this variable. We reviewed existing literature in order to understand Player Load better; we found many inconsistencies in PL calculation methods and in the meanings attached to it. Accordingly, this paper presents a brief discussion on the meanings that have been assigned to Player Load, its limitations, and the lack of clear and complete information about Player Load calculation methods. Moreover, the use of arbitrary units and different practical meanings in the literature has associated Player Load with many physical quantities, thereby resulting in difficulties in determining what Player Load measures within the context of sports. It seems that Player Load is related to the magnitude of changes in acceleration, but not the magnitude of acceleration itself. Therefore, coaches and sports scientists should take this information into account when they use Player Load to prescribe and monitor external loads. We concluded that a deeper discussion of Player Load as a descriptor of external load is warranted in the sports sciences literature.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2019-0072DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7052708PMC
January 2020

Influence of Match Status on Players' Prominence and Teams' Network Properties During 2018 FIFA World Cup.

Front Psychol 2019 28;10:695. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Centro de Estudos em Cognição e Ação/ UFMG Soccer Science Center, Departamento de Esportes, Escola de Educação Física, Fisioterapia e Terapia Ocupacional, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

The analyses of players and teams' behaviors during the FIFA World Cup may provide a better understanding on how football tactics and strategies have developed in the past few years in elite football. The Social Network Analysis (SNA) has been carried out in the investigations about passing distribution, improving the understanding on how players interact and cooperate during a match. In football official matches, studies have used the SNA as a means of coding players' cooperation and opposition patterns. However, situational variables such as match status were previously investigated and associated with changes on teams' dynamics within and/or between matches, but were not considered in studies based on Social Network Analysis. This study aimed to analyze the influence of match status on teams' cooperation patterns and players' prominence according to playing positions during 2018 FIFA World Cup. Fourteen matches of the knockout stage were analyzed. Macro and micro network measures were obtained from adjacency matrixes collected for each team, in each match status (winning, drawing, and losing). A one-way ANOVA was used to compare teams' networks (macro-analysis variables) within each match status, while a two-way ANOVA (match status × playing position) was used to compare the micro-analysis variables. Results showed no differences between match status for macro analysis. Winning situations induced higher prominence in central midfielders (0.107; = 0.001), wide midfielders (0.093; = 0.001), and center forward (0.085; = 0.001), while in losing situations lower prominence levels were observed for goalkeepers (0.044; = 0.001) and center forward (0.074; = 0.001). Data revealed that teams do not change macrostructures according to match status. On the other hand, the microstructures showed important adaptations regarding game styles, with changes in players' behaviors according to playing positions. In general, the levels of centrality and prestige in players of different positions indicated a more direct play style in winning situations and a more build-up style in losing situations. These results allow a better understanding about the influence of match status on players' and teams' performance during high-level football competitions and may help coaches to improve athletes' performance in these situations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00695DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6447613PMC
March 2019

TEST-retest reliability of kinetic variables measured on campus board in sport climbers.

Sports Biomech 2019 Dec 16;18(6):649-662. Epub 2018 May 16.

Department of Sports, School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Federal University of Minas Gerais , Minas Gerais , Brazil .

Sport climbers frequently use campus board (CB) to improve their upper limb strength under similar conditions of high-difficulty sport climbing routes. The objective of this study was to assess the test-retest reliability of peak force and impulse measured using a CB instrumented with two load cells on starting holds. The same evaluator examined 22 climbers on two days with 48 h between the assessments. The participants performed five concentric lunges (CL) and five lunges with stretch-shortening cycle with 1 min intervals between repetitions and 10 min between exercises. All variables were associated with significant intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values ( = 0.001), and none variable showed systematic errors ( > 0.05). Peak force ICC was higher than 0.88, and the standard error of measurement (SEM%) was less than 5%. Impulse ICC for the CL was greater than 0.90, and the SEM% was less than 14%. We conclude that the kinetic variables measured using the CB were reliable. The ability of the hands to maintain contact with the holds (peak force) and the abilities of the arms and shoulders vertically move the centre of mass (impulse) should be taken into account by coaches on CB training prescription as well for further research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14763141.2018.1456558DOI Listing
December 2019

Task difficulty and inertial properties of hand-held tools: An assessment of their concurrent effects on precision aiming.

Hum Mov Sci 2016 Aug 21;48:161-70. Epub 2016 May 21.

Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Science, School of Physical Education, Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Aiming hand-held tools at targets in space entails adjustments in the dynamical organization of aiming patterns according to the required precision. We asked whether and how these adjustments are modified by the tool's mass distribution. Twelve participants performed reciprocal aiming movements with a 50-cm long wooden probe. Kinematic patterns of probe movements were used as a window into the behavioral dynamic underlying performance of a reciprocal aiming task. We crossed three levels of task difficulty (IDs 2.8, 4.5 and 6.1) with two types of probe varying in their mass distribution (proximal vs distal loading). Movement duration was affected by task difficulty and probe loading (shorter for larger targets and proximal probe loading). Progressive deviations from a sinusoidal movement pattern were observed as task difficulty increased. Such deviations were more pronounced with proximal probe loading. Results point to a higher degree of non-linearity in aiming dynamics when the probe was loaded proximally, which might reflect employment of additional perceptual-motor processes to control the position of its less stable tip at the vicinity of the targets. More generally, the effects of probe loading on aiming pattern and dynamics suggest that perceptual-motor processes responding to task level constraints are sensitive to, and not independent from, biomechanical, end-effector constraints.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2016.05.003DOI Listing
August 2016

Brain Temperature in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats during Physical Exercise in Temperate and Warm Environments.

PLoS One 2016 23;11(5):e0155919. Epub 2016 May 23.

Laboratório de Biologia do Exercício, Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, MG, Brasil.

This study aimed to evaluate brain temperature (Tbrain) changes in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) subjected to two different physical exercise protocols in temperate or warm environments. We also investigated whether hypertension affects the kinetics of exercise-induced increases in Tbrain relative to the kinetics of abdominal temperature (Tabd) increases. Male 16-week-old normotensive Wistar rats (NWRs) and SHRs were implanted with an abdominal temperature sensor and a guide cannula in the frontal cortex to enable the insertion of a thermistor to measure Tbrain. Next, the animals were subjected to incremental-speed (initial speed of 10 m/min; speed was increased by 1 m/min every 3 min) or constant-speed (60% of the maximum speed) treadmill running until they were fatigued in a temperate (25°C) or warm (32°C) environment. Tbrain, Tabd and tail skin temperature were measured every min throughout the exercise trials. During incremental and constant exercise at 25°C and 32°C, the SHR group exhibited greater increases in Tbrain and Tabd relative to the NWR group. Irrespective of the environment, the heat loss threshold was attained at higher temperatures (either Tbrain or Tabd) in the SHRs. Moreover, the brain-abdominal temperature differential was lower at 32°C in the SHRs than in the NWRs during treadmill running. Overall, we conclude that SHRs exhibit enhanced brain hyperthermia during exercise and that hypertension influences the kinetics of the Tbrain relative to the Tabd increases, particularly during exercise in a warm environment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0155919PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4877067PMC
July 2017

Bandwidth knowledge of results on the learning of the saloon dart throwing task.

Percept Mot Skills 2014 Apr;118(2):462-74

The effects of two different bandwidths of information of Knowledge of Results (KR) were investigated. 54 university students participated. The experiment consisted of an acquisition phase with practice of throwing a saloon dart as accurately as possible at a target lying on the floor 2.5 meters away until a specific area of the target was hit three trials in a row. Narrow bandwidth and Wide bandwidth groups received KR when performance was outside the bandwidth. A Control group received KR after every trial. A transfer test was run 10 min. later with 10 more trials and the target 3.0 m away, with no KR. Analyses showed that narrow KR bandwidth was associated with better learning of real world tasks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2466/25.23.PMS.118k17w9DOI Listing
April 2014