Publications by authors named "Anders Winther Voldby"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Goal-directed fluid therapy in urgent GAstrointestinal Surgery-study protocol for A Randomised multicentre Trial: The GAS-ART trial.

BMJ Open 2018 11 13;8(11):e022651. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Department of Surgery, Holbaek University Hospital, Holbaek, Denmark.

Introduction: Intravenous fluid therapy during gastrointestinal surgery is a life-saving part of the perioperative care. Too little fluid may lead to hypovolaemia, decreased organ perfusion and circulatory shock. Excessive fluid administration increases postoperative complications, worsens pulmonary and cardiac function as well as the healing of surgical wounds. Intraoperative individualised goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT) and zero-balance therapy (weight adjusted) has shown to reduce postoperative complications in elective surgery, but studies in urgent gastrointestinal surgery are sparse. The aim of the trial is to test whether zero-balance GDT reduces postoperative mortality and major complications following urgent surgery for obstructive bowel disease or perforation of the gastrointestinal tract compared with a protocolled standard of care.

Methods/analysis: This study is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial with planned inclusion of 310 patients. The randomisation procedure is stratified by hospital and by obstructive bowel disease and perforation of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients are allocated into either 'the standard group' or 'the zero-balance GDT group'. The latter receive intraoperative GDT (guided by a stroke volume algorithm) and postoperative zero-balance fluid therapy based on body weight and fluid charts. The protocolled treatment continues until free oral intake or the seventh postoperative day.The primary composite outcome is death, unplanned reoperations, life-threatening thromboembolic and bleeding complications, a need for mechanical ventilation or dialysis. Secondary outcomes are additional complications, length of hospital stay, length of stay in the intensive care unit, length of mechanical ventilation, readmissions and time to death. Follow-up is 90 days.We plan intention-to-treat analysis of the primary outcome.

Ethics And Dissemination: The Danish Scientific Ethics Committee approved the GAS-ART trial before patient enrolment (J: SJ-436). Enrolment of patients began in August 2015 and is proceeding. We expect to publish the GAS-ART results in Summer 2019.

Trial Registration Number: EudraCT 2015-000563-14.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022651DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6252645PMC
November 2018

Fluid therapy in the perioperative setting-a clinical review.

J Intensive Care 2016 16;4:27. Epub 2016 Apr 16.

Department of Surgery, Holbaek University Hospital, Smedelundsgade 60, 4300 Holbaek, Denmark.

Background: Perioperative hypovolemia and fluid overload have effects on both complications following surgery and on patient survival. Therefore, the administration of intravenous fluids before, during, and after surgery at the right time and in the right amounts is of great importance. This review aims to analyze the literature concerning perioperative fluid therapy in abdominal surgery and to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice.

Results: Preoperative oral or intravenous administration of carbohydrate containing fluids has been shown to improve postoperative well-being and muscular strength and to reduce insulin resistance. Hence, the intake of fluid (preferably containing carbohydrates) should be encouraged up to 2 h prior to surgery in order to avoid dehydration. Excessive intravenous fluid administration adds to tissue inflammation and edema formation, thereby compromising tissue healing. During major abdominal surgery a "zero-balance" intraoperative fluid strategy aims at avoiding fluid overload (and comparable to the so-called restrictive approach) as well as goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT). Both proved to significantly reduce postoperative complications when compared to "standard fluid therapy". Trials comparing "restrictive" or zero-balance and GDT have shown equal results, as long as fluid overload is avoided in the GDT group as well (categorized as "zero-balance GDT"). It is possible that high-risk surgical patients, such as those undergoing acute surgery, may benefit from the continuous monitoring of circulatory status that the GDT provides. Data on this group of patients is not available at present, but trials are ongoing.

Conclusion: In elective surgery, the zero-balance approach has shown to reduce postoperative complications and is easily applied for most patients. It is less expensive and simpler than the zero-balance GDT approach and therefore recommended in this review. In outpatient surgery, 1-2 L of balanced crystalloids reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting and improves well-being.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40560-016-0154-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833950PMC
April 2016
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