Publications by authors named "Anders Kjaeldgaard"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cervical amputation versus vaginal hysterectomy: a population-based register study.

Int Urogynecol J 2017 Feb 16;28(2):257-266. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet and the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.

Introduction And Hypothesis: Surgical management of uterine prolapse varies greatly and recently uterus-preserving techniques have been gaining popularity. The aim of this study was to compare patient-reported outcomes after cervical amputation versus vaginal hysterectomy, with or without concomitant anterior colporrhaphy, in women suffering from pelvic organ prolapse.

Method: We carried out a population-based longitudinal cohort study with data from the Swedish National Quality Register for Gynecological Surgery. Between 2006 and 2013, a total of 3,174 patients with uterine prolapse were identified, who had undergone primary surgery with either cervical amputation or vaginal hysterectomy, with or without concomitant anterior colporrhaphy. Pre- and postoperative prolapse-related symptoms and patient satisfaction were assessed, in addition to complications and adverse events. Between-group comparisons were performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression.

Results: There were no differences between the two groups in neither symptom relief nor patient satisfaction. In both groups a total of 81 % of the women reported the absence of vaginal bulging 1 year after surgery and a total of 89 % were satisfied with the result of the operation. The vaginal hysterectomy group had a higher rate of severe complications than the cervical amputation group, 1.9 % vs 0.2 % (p < 0.001). The vaginal hysterectomy group also had a longer duration of surgery and greater perioperative blood loss, in addition to longer hospitalization.

Conclusions: Cervical amputation seems to perform equally well in comparison to vaginal hysterectomy in the treatment of uterine prolapse, but with less morbidity and a lower rate of severe complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-016-3119-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5306059PMC
February 2017

Does the choice of suture material matter in anterior and posterior colporrhaphy?

Int Urogynecol J 2016 Sep 2;27(9):1357-65. Epub 2016 Mar 2.

Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet and the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Södersjukhuset, 11832 Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.

Introduction And Hypothesis: The optimal suture material in traditional prolapse surgery is still controversial. Our aim was to investigate the effect of using sutures with rapid (RA) or slow (SA) absorption, on symptomatic recurrence after anterior and posterior colporrhaphy.

Methods: A population-based longitudinal cohort study with data from the Swedish National Quality Register for Gynecological Surgery. A total of 1,107 women who underwent primary anterior colporrhaphy and 577 women who underwent primary posterior colporrhaphy between September 2012 and September 2013 were included. Two groups in each cohort were created based on which suture material was used. Pre- and postoperative prolapse-related symptoms and patient satisfaction were assessed.

Results: We found a significantly lower rate of symptomatic recurrence 1 year after anterior colporrhaphy in the SA suture group compared with the RA suture group, 50 out of 230 (22 %) vs 152 out of 501 (30 %), odds ratio 1.6 (CI 1.1-2.3; p = 0.01). The SA group also had a significantly higher patient satisfaction rate, 83 % vs 75 %, odds ratio 1.6 (CI 1.04-2.4), (p = 0.03). Urgency improved significantly more in the RA suture group (p < 0.001). In the posterior colporrhaphy cohort there was no significant difference between the suture materials.

Conclusions: This study indicates that the use of slowly absorbable sutures decreases the odds of having a symptomatic recurrence after an anterior colporrhaphy compared with the use of rapidly absorbable sutures. However, the use of RA sutures may result in less urgency 1 year postoperatively. In posterior colporrhaphy the choice of suture material does not affect postoperative symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-016-2981-0DOI Listing
September 2016

Analysis of early human neural crest development.

Dev Biol 2010 Aug 15;344(2):578-92. Epub 2010 May 15.

Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8103, USA.

The outstanding migration and differentiation capacities of neural crest cells (NCCs) have fascinated scientists since Wilhelm His described this cell population in 1868. Today, after intense research using vertebrate model organisms, we have gained considerable knowledge regarding the origin, migration and differentiation of NCCs. However, our understanding of NCC development in human embryos remains largely uncharacterized, despite the role the neural crest plays in several human pathologies. Here, we report for the first time the expression of a battery of molecular markers before, during, or following NCC migration in human embryos from Carnegie Stages (CS) 12 to 18. Our work demonstrates the expression of Sox9, Sox10 and Pax3 transcription factors in premigratory NCCs, while actively migrating NCCs display the additional transcription factors Pax7 and AP-2alpha. Importantly, while HNK-1 labels few migrating NCCs, p75(NTR) labels a large proportion of this population. However, the broad expression of p75(NTR) - and other markers - beyond the neural crest stresses the need for the identification of additional markers to improve our capacity to investigate human NCC development, and to enable the generation of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2010.05.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2927129PMC
August 2010

Early first trimester human embryonic cardiac Islet-1 progenitor cells and cardiomyocytes: Immunohistochemical and electrophysiological characterization.

Stem Cell Res 2010 Jan 6;4(1):69-76. Epub 2009 Nov 6.

Karolinska Institute at Clinical Research Centre, Novum, Sweden.

The aims of this study were to systematically characterize the distribution, proliferation, and differentiation of Islet-1(+)(Isl1(+)) progenitor cells in the early first trimester human embryonic heart during which period most of the organogenesis takes place. In hearts of gestational week 5 to 10 Isl1(+)cells were identified and mainly clustered in the outflow tract and to a lesser extent in the atria and in the right ventricle. Some of the clusters were also troponin T(+). Unexpectedly a only few Isl1(+)cells were Ki67(+)while in the ventricles a majority of Isl1(-)troponinT(+)cells were Ki67(+). Cultures derived from the digested embryonic heart developed into spontaneously beating cardiospheres. At harvest cells in these cardiospheres showed frequent expression of troponin T(+)and Nkx2.5(+), while Isl1 was expressed only in scattered cells. Only a minority of the cultured cells expressed Ki67. The cardiospheres could be frozen, thawed, and recultured to beating cardiospheres. In a multielectrode array system, the beating cardiospheres were responsive to adrenergic stimulation and exhibited rate-dependent action potential duration. In conclusion, the early first trimester human embryonic heart expresses clusters of Isl1(+)cells, some of which differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Unexpectedly, only a minority of the Isl1(+)cells, while a majority of ventricular cardiomyocytes, were proliferating. Spontaneously beating cardiospheres could be derived from the human embryonic heart and these cardiospheres showed functional frequency control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scr.2009.10.001DOI Listing
January 2010

Urodynamic assessment of anterior vaginal wall surgery: a randomized comparison between colporraphy and transvaginal mesh.

Neurourol Urodyn 2010 Apr;29(4):527-31

Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.

Aims: To investigate the urodynamic effects of anterior vaginal wall prolapse surgery using either trocar guided transvaginal mesh or colporraphy.

Methods: A prospective, randomized multicenter trial enrolling 50 patients: 27 underwent anterior colporrhaphy and 23 anterior trocar guided transvaginal mesh. Urodynamic assessment was performed pre- and two months postoperatively.

Results: De novo stress urinary incontinence was significantly more common after trocar guided transvaginal mesh surgery compared to colporraphy. In comparison to baseline urodynamics, transvaginal mesh surgery resulted in a significant decrease in maximal urethral closing pressures (MUCP) whereas conventional anterior colporraphy had no significant effect on urodynamic parameters.

Conclusion: Trocar guided transvaginal mesh of anterior vaginal wall prolapse results in a lowering of MUCPs and increases the risk for de novo stress urinary incontinence compared to colporraphy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nau.20811DOI Listing
April 2010

Generation of hepatocyte-like cells from in vitro transdifferentiated human fetal pancreas.

Cell Transplant 2009 ;18(2):183-93

Division of Transplantation Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Although the appearance of hepatic foci in the pancreas has been described in animal experiments and in human pathology, evidence for the conversion of human pancreatic cells to liver cells is still lacking. We therefore investigated the developmental plasticity between human embryonic pancreatic cells and liver cells. Cells were isolated and expanded from 7-8-week-old human fetal pancreata (HFP) and were characterized for the absence and presence of pancreatic and hepatic markers. In vitro expanded HFP were treated with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and dexamethasone (DX) to induce a liver phenotye in the cells. These treated cells in various passages were further studied for their capacity to be functional in hepatic parenchyma following retrorsine-induced injury in nude C57 black mice. Amylase- and EPCAM-positive-enriched cells isolated from HFP and treated with FGF2 and DX lost expression of pancreatic markers and gained a liver phenotype. Hepatic differentiation was based on the expression (both at the mRNA and protein level) of liver markers albumin and cytokeratin 19. When transplanted in vivo into nude mice treated with retrorsine, both cell types successfully engrafted and functionally differentiated into hepatic cells expressing human albumin, glycogen, dipeptidyl peptidase, and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase. These data indicate that human fetal pancreatic cells have a capacity to alter their gene expression profile in response to exogenous treatment with FGF2 and DX. It may be possible to generate an unlimited supply of hepatocytes in vitro for cell therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368909788341333DOI Listing
August 2009

Long-term culture and neuronal survival after intraspinal transplantation of human spinal cord-derived neurospheres.

Physiol Behav 2007 Sep 25;92(1-2):60-6. Epub 2007 May 25.

Karolinska Institutet, Division of Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Novum, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.

There is heterogeneity in neural stem and progenitor cell characteristics depending on their species and regional origin. In search for potent in vitro-expanded human neural precursor cells and cell therapy methods to repair the injured human spinal cord, the possible influence exerted by intrinsic cellular heterogeneity has to be considered. Data available on in vitro-expanded human spinal cord-derived cells are sparse and it has previously been difficult to establish long-term neurosphere cultures showing multipotentiality. In the present paper, human spinal cord-derived neurospheres were cultured in the presence of EGF, bFGF and CNTF for up to 25 passages (>350 days) in vitro. In contrast to the human first trimester subcortical forebrain, spinal cord tissue>9.5 weeks of gestation could not serve as a source for long-term neurosphere cultures under the present conditions. After withdrawal of mitogens, cultured neurospheres (at 18 passages) gave rise to cells with neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendrocytic phenotypes in vitro. After transplantation of human spinal cord-derived neurospheres to the lesioned spinal cord of immuno-deficient adult rats, large numbers of cells survived at least up to 6 weeks, expressing neuronal and astrocytic phenotypes. These results demonstrate that it is possible to expand and maintain multipotent human spinal cord-derived neurospheres in vitro for extended time-periods and that they have promising in vivo potential after engraftment to the injured spinal cord.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2007.05.056DOI Listing
September 2007

Cellular composition of long-term human spinal cord- and forebrain-derived neurosphere cultures.

J Neurosci Res 2006 Aug;84(3):471-82

Neurotec Department, Division of Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

In vitro expanded neural precursor cells (NPCs) may provide a stable source for cell therapy. In search of the optimal cell source for spinal cord repair, we investigated influences of gestational age, regional heterogeneity, and long-term in vitro propagation. The cellular content of neurosphere cultures prior to and after in vitro differentiation was studied by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Human forebrain and spinal cord NPCs deriving from first-trimester tissue were cultured as neurospheres in the presence of epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and ciliary neurotrophic factor. Proteins characteristic for embryonic stem cells, i.e., Tra-1-60, Tra-1-81, and SSEA-4, were present in approximately 0.5% of the cells in donor tissues and neurospheres. The proportions of nestin- and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-immunoreactive (IR) cells were also maintained, whereas the CD133-IR population increased in vitro. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-IR cells increased in number, and in contrast the fraction of beta-tubulin III-IR cells decreased, at and beyond passage 5 in spinal cord but not forebrain cultures. However, dissociated and in vitro-differentiated forebrain- and spinal cord-derived neurospheres generated similar proportions of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Gestational age of the donor tissue, which ranged from 4.5 to 12 weeks for forebrain and from 4.5 to 9.5 weeks for spinal cord, did not affect the proportion of cells with different phenotypes in culture. Thus, cellular composition of human neurosphere cultures differs as a result of long-term in vitro propagation and regional heterogeneity of source tissue, despite expansion under equal culture conditions. This could in turn imply that human spinal cord and forebrain NPCs present different repair potentials in in vivo settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jnr.20955DOI Listing
August 2006

Higher expression of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in human fetal compared to adult brain.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2003 May;142(2):151-60

Neurotec Department, Division of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.

Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are thought to be involved in regulation of several processes during neurogenesis of the brain. In this study the expression of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype was investigated in human fetal (9-11 weeks of gestation), middle-aged (28-51 years) and aged (68-94 years) medulla oblongata, pons, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. The specific binding of the alpha7 receptor antagonist [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin was significantly higher in fetal than in both middle-aged and aged medulla oblongata and aged pons. No significant decrease in [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites was observed from fetal to adult cortex and cerebellum. The alpha7 mRNA expression was significantly higher in all fetal brain regions investigated, except for aged cortex, than in corresponding middle-aged and aged tissue. The high expression of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in fetal compared to adult brain supports the view that these receptors play an important role during brain development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0165-3806(03)00063-4DOI Listing
May 2003

The alpha7 nicotinic receptors in human fetal brain and spinal cord.

J Neurochem 2002 Feb;80(3):457-65

Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy and Elderly Care Research, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype is believed to be involved in the regulation of neuronal growth, differentiation and synapse formation during the development of the human brain. In this study the expression of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was investigated in human fetal brain and spinal cord of 5-11 weeks gestational age. Both the specific binding of [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin to prenatal brain membranes and the expression of alpha7 mRNA were significantly higher in the pons, medulla oblongata, mesencephalon and spinal cord of 9-11 weeks gestational age compared with cerebellum, cortex and subcortical forebrain. A significant positive correlation between gestational age and the expression of alpha7 mRNA was observed in all brain regions except cortex. A positive correlation was also observed between the gestational age and the [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin binding in the pons, medulla oblongata, mesencephalon, and cerebellum. Consequently, a significant relationship between the alpha7 mRNA levels and the binding sites for [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin was found in the fetal brain. The increasing levels of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor during the first trimester support the important role of nAChRs for the development of the central nervous system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.0022-3042.2001.00714.xDOI Listing
February 2002