Publications by authors named "Andżelina Łopińska"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ticks on game animals in the fragmented agricultural landscape of western Poland.

Parasitol Res 2021 May 31;120(5):1781-1788. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Department of Zoology, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Zielona Góra, Prof. Z. Szafrana 1, 65-516, Zielona Góra, Poland.

Ticks (Acari: Ixodida) are well known external parasites of game animals that cause serious veterinary and medical problems. The occurrence and geographical distribution of different species of ticks in Western Poland have changed over the last decades. The purpose of the present study was to determine the species spectrum and prevalence of ticks parasitizing three species of game animals, the Eurasian wild boar Sus scrofa L., red deer Cervus elaphus L., and roe deer Capreolus capreolus (L.) in two hunting districts in Lubuskie Province. In addition, the distribution of ticks on the host's body and the intensity of infestation were determined. Ticks were collected from dead animals during the hunting seasons in 2013 and 2014, over the periods from May to June and from August to December. In total, 286 specimens were examined: 138 Eurasian wild boars, 8 red deers, and 140 roe deers. Altogether, 1891 ticks were collected. Three species of ticks were determined: Ixodes ricinus (L.), Dermacentor reticulatus (Fabricius, 1794), and Haemaphysalis concinna (C.L. Koch, 1844). H. concinna was recorded for the first time in Lubuskie Province.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-021-07132-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084817PMC
May 2021

Low Occurrence of in Gulls and Songbirds.

Pol J Microbiol 2020 ;69:1-6

Robert Koch Institute , Wernigerode Branch, Wernigerode , Germany.

is a worldwide occurring nosocomial pathogen, the natural habitats of which remain to be defined. Recently, white stork nestlings have been described as a recurring source of . Here, we challenged the hypothesis of a general preference of for avian hosts. Taking advantage of campaigns to ring free-living birds, we collected cloacal swab samples from 741 black-headed gulls () in Poland, tracheal and cloacal swabs from 285 songbirds in Poland as well as tracheal swabs from 25 songbirds in Slovenia and screened those for the growth of on CHROMagar Acinetobacter. Of the 1,051 samples collected only two yielded isolates. Each carried one variant of the gene, i.e. OXA-71 and OXA-208, which have been described previously in clinical isolates of . In conclusion, our data do not support a general preference of for avian hosts.

is a worldwide occurring nosocomial pathogen, the natural habitats of which remain to be defined. Recently, white stork nestlings have been described as a recurring source of . Here, we challenged the hypothesis of a general preference of for avian hosts. Taking advantage of campaigns to ring free-living birds, we collected cloacal swab samples from 741 black-headed gulls () in Poland, tracheal and cloacal swabs from 285 songbirds in Poland as well as tracheal swabs from 25 songbirds in Slovenia and screened those for the growth of on CHROMagar Acinetobacter. Of the 1,051 samples collected only two yielded isolates. Each carried one variant of the gene, i.e. OXA-71 and OXA-208, which have been described previously in clinical isolates of . In conclusion, our data do not support a general preference of for avian hosts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.33073/pjm-2020-011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7256842PMC
December 2020

Relatedness of wildlife and livestock avian isolates of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii to lineages spread in hospitals worldwide.

Environ Microbiol 2017 10 9;19(10):4349-4364. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Zielona Góra, Prof. Z. Szafrana Street 1, 65-561 Zielona Góra, Poland.

The natural habitats and potential reservoirs of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are poorly defined. Here, we put forth and tested the hypothesis of avian reservoirs of A. baumannii. We screened tracheal and rectal swab samples from livestock (chicken, geese) and wild birds (white stork nestlings) and isolated A. baumannii from 3% of sampled chicken (n = 220), 8% of geese (n = 40) and 25% of white stork nestlings (n = 661). Virulence of selected avian A. baumannii isolates was comparable to that of clinical isolates in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Whole genome sequencing revealed the close relationship of an antibiotic-susceptible chicken isolate from Germany with a multidrug-resistant human clinical isolate from China and additional linkages between livestock isolates and human clinical isolates related to international clonal lineages. Moreover, we identified stork isolates related to human clinical isolates from the United States. Multilocus sequence typing disclosed further kinship between avian and human isolates. Avian isolates do not form a distinct clade within the phylogeny of A. baumannii, instead they diverge into different lineages. Further, we provide evidence that A. baumannii is constantly present in the habitats occupied by storks. Collectively, our study suggests A. baumannii could be a zoonotic organism that may disseminate into livestock.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.13931DOI Listing
October 2017