Publications by authors named "Anastasia Tzimou"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of Aging, Long-Term and Lifelong Exercise on the Urinary Metabolic Footprint of Rats.

Metabolites 2020 Nov 25;10(12). Epub 2020 Nov 25.

Laboratory of Evaluation of Human Biological Performance, School of Physical Education and Sports Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece.

Life expectancy has risen in the past decades, resulting in an increase in the number of aged individuals. Exercise remains one of the most cost-effective treatments against disease and the physical consequences of aging. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of aging, long-term and lifelong exercise on the rat urinary metabolome. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups: exercise from 3 to 12 months of age (A), lifelong exercise from 3 to 21 months of age (B), no exercise (C), and exercise from 12 to 21 months of age (D). Exercise consisted in swimming for 20 min/day, 5 days/week. Urine samples collection was performed at 3, 12 and 21 months of life and their analysis was conducted by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate analysis of the metabolite data did not show any discrimination between groups at any of the three aforementioned ages. However, multivariate analysis discriminated the three ages clearly when the groups were treated as one. Univariate analysis showed that training increased the levels of urinary amino acids and possibly protected against sarcopenia, as evidenced by the higher levels of creatine in the exercising groups. Aging was accompanied by decreased levels of urinary amino acids and signs of increased glycolysis. Concluding, both aging and, to a lesser degree, exercise affected the rat urinary metabolome, including metabolites related to energy metabolism, with exercise showing a potential to mitigate the consequences of aging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/metabo10120481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7760742PMC
November 2020

Effects of lifelong exercise and aging on the blood metabolic fingerprint of rats.

Biogerontology 2020 10 29;21(5):577-591. Epub 2020 Mar 29.

Laboratory of Evaluation of Human Biological Performance, School of Physical Education and Sports Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Regular exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, as it helps maintain a healthy weight and reduces the risk of chronic diseases. We explored the effects of lifelong exercise and aging on rat metabolism through a metabolomics approach. Thirty-six rats were divided into four equal groups: exercise during the 1st half of life (3-12 months), lifelong exercise (3-21 months), no exercise, and exercise during the 2nd half of life (12-21 months). Exercise consisted in swimming for 20 min, five times a week. Blood samples collected at 3, 12, and 21 months of life were analysed by H NMR spectroscopy. The groups that exercised during the 2nd half of life weighed less than the groups that did not. Exercise had an orexigenic effect during the 1st half and an anorexigenic effect during the 2nd half. Multivariate analysis showed a clear discrimination between ages when groups were treated as one and between the exercising and non-exercising groups at 12 months. Univariate analysis showed many effects of aging and some effects of exercise on metabolites involved in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Especially during the 1st half, exercise had anabolic effects, whereas aging had catabolic effects on amino acid metabolism. In two cases (glycine and succinate), exercise (especially during the 1st half) mitigated potentially harmful effects of aging. The higher values of succinate and the lower values of lactate during the 1st half in the exercising groups suggest increased oxidative metabolism. In conclusion, moderate-intensity exercise for life or half-life had strong and potentially healthful effects on body weight and (partly) appetite, as well as on some blood metabolites. The effects of aging on the rat blood metabolome seemed to be stronger than those of exercise.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10522-020-09871-1DOI Listing
October 2020

Loss of CD36 protects against diet-induced obesity but results in impaired muscle stem cell function, delayed muscle regeneration and hepatic steatosis.

Acta Physiol (Oxf) 2020 03 1;228(3):e13395. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

Molecular Physiology Laboratory, Centre for Atherothrombosis & Metabolic Disease, Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Hull, UK.

Aim: The prevalence of obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases including impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Since skeletal muscle regenerative capacity is regulated by satellite cells, we aimed to investigate whether a high-fat diet impairs satellite cell function and whether this is linked to fatty acid uptake via CD36. We also aimed to determine whether loss of CD36 impacts on muscle redox homeostasis and skeletal muscle regenerative capacity.

Methods: We studied the impact of a high-fat diet and CD36 deficiency on murine skeletal muscle morphology, redox homeostasis, satellite cell function, bioenergetics and lipid accumulation in the liver. We also determined the effect of CD36 deficiency on skeletal muscle regeneration.

Results: High-fat diet increased body weight, intramuscular lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in wild-type mice that were significantly mitigated in CD36-deficient mice. High-fat diet and CD36 deficiency independently attenuated satellite cell function on single fibres and myogenic capacity on primary satellite cells. CD36 deficiency resulted in delayed skeletal muscle regeneration following acute injury with cardiotoxin. CD36-deficient and wild-type primary satellite cells had distinct bioenergetic profiles in response to palmitate. High-fat diet induced hepatic steatosis in both genotypes that was more pronounced in the CD36-deficient mice.

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CD36 deficiency protects against diet-induced obesity, intramuscular lipid deposition and oxidative stress but results in impaired muscle satellite cell function, delayed muscle regeneration and hepatic steatosis. CD36 is a key mediator of fatty acid uptake in skeletal muscle, linking obesity with satellite cell function and muscle regeneration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apha.13395DOI Listing
March 2020

Attenuation of oxidative stress-induced lesions in skeletal muscle in a mouse model of obesity-independent hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis through the inhibition of Nox2 activity.

Free Radic Biol Med 2018 12 17;129:504-519. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Molecular Physiology Laboratory, Centre for Atherothrombotic & Metabolic Disease, Hull York Medical School, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Obesity leading to hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis is recognised to induce morphological and metabolic changes in many tissues. However, hyperlipidaemia can occur in the absence of obesity. The impact of the latter scenario on skeletal muscle and liver is not understood sufficiently. In this regard, we used the Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE) mouse model, an established model of hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis, that does not become obese when subjected to a high-fat diet, to determine the impact of Western-type diet (WD) and ApoE deficiency on skeletal muscle morphological, metabolic and biochemical properties. To establish the potential of therapeutic targets, we further examined the impact of Nox2 pharmacological inhibition on skeletal muscle redox biology. We found ectopic lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle and the liver, and altered skeletal muscle morphology and intramuscular triacylglycerol fatty acid composition. WD and ApoE deficiency had a detrimental impact in muscle metabolome, followed by perturbed gene expression for fatty acid uptake and oxidation. Importantly, there was enhanced oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle and development of liver steatosis, inflammation and oxidative protein modifications. Pharmacological inhibition of Nox2 decreased reactive oxygen species production and protein oxidative modifications in the muscle of ApoE mice subjected to a Western-type diet. This study provides key evidence to better understand the pathophysiology of skeletal muscle in the context of hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis and identifies Nox2 as a potential target for attenuating oxidative stress in skeletal muscle in a mouse model of obesity-independent hyperlipidaemia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2018.10.422DOI Listing
December 2018

Gradual decline in performance and changes in biochemical parameters of basketball players while resting after warm-up.

Eur J Appl Physiol 2012 Sep 20;112(9):3327-34. Epub 2012 Jan 20.

Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Warm-up is used before every competitive sporting activity as a means to activate the body, reduce the risk of injury and increase performance in subsequent tasks. However, there is little information on how long the effects of warm-up last. This is of particular interest in basketball playing, since no rewarm-up is allowed to players who sit on the bench. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine changes in performance and biochemical parameters of basketball players while resting after warm-up. On each of four consecutive days, 14 elite basketball players (7 male and 7 female) performed a structured warm-up program, after which they had body temperature measured, provided blood samples and performed countermovement jump and 20-m run tests. Then, they rested for either 10, 20, 30 or 40 min in a random, counterbalanced order. Temperature measurement, blood sampling, and performance testing were repeated after each rest interval. Body temperature and countermovement jump decreased gradually during rest (p < 0.05 for linear trend), whereas 10- and 20-m run times increased gradually (p < 0.05 for linear trend). Serum glucose decreased during rest (p = 0.028) independent of interval duration. We conclude that there is a relatively fast decline in jumping and running performance when basketball players remain inactive after warm-up. Our study highlights the need to address the rapid drop in performance after warm-up for the basketball players who do not participate in a game from the start.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-012-2320-1DOI Listing
September 2012
-->