Publications by authors named "Anastasia A Ignatova"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Platelet function and bleeding at different phases of childhood immune thrombocytopenia.

Sci Rep 2021 04 30;11(1):9401. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

National Medical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology Named After Dmitry Rogachev, Russian Ministry of Healthcare, 1 Samory Mashela Str, Moscow, Russia, 117997.

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is believed to be associated with platelet function defects. However, their mechanisms are poorly understood, in particular with regard to differences between ITP phases, patient age, and therapy. We investigated platelet function and bleeding in children with either persistent or chronic ITP, with or without romiplostim therapy. The study included 151 children with ITP, of whom 56 had disease duration less than 12 months (grouped together as acute/persistent) and 95 were chronic. Samples of 57 healthy children were used as controls, while 5 patients with leukemia, 5 with aplastic anemia, 4 with MYH9-associated thrombocytopenia, and 7 with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome were used as non-ITP thrombocytopenia controls. Whole blood flow cytometry revealed that platelets in both acute/persistent and chronic ITP were increased in size compared with healthy donors. They were also pre-activated as assessed by PAC1, CD62p, cytosolic calcium, and procoagulant platelet levels. This pattern was not observed in other childhood thrombocytopenias. Pre-activation by CD62p was higher in the bleeding group in the chronic ITP cohort only. Romiplostim treatment decreased size and pre-activation of the patient platelets, but not calcium. Our data suggest that increased size, pre-activation, and cytosolic calcium are common for all ITP platelets, but their association with bleeding could depend on the disease phase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-88900-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8087794PMC
April 2021

Spatial Structure and Activity of Synthetic Fragments of Lynx1 and of Nicotinic Receptor Loop C Models.

Biomolecules 2020 12 22;11(1). Epub 2020 Dec 22.

Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 117997 Moscow, Russia.

Lynx1, membrane-bound protein co-localized with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and regulates their function, is a three-finger protein (TFP) made of three β-structural loops, similarly to snake venom α-neurotoxin TFPs. Since the central loop II of α-neurotoxins is involved in binding to nAChRs, we have recently synthesized the fragments of Lynx1 central loop, including those with the disulfide between Cys residues introduced at N- and C-termini, some of them inhibiting muscle-type nAChR similarly to the whole-size water-soluble Lynx1 (ws-Lynx1). Literature shows that the main fragment interacting with TFPs is the C-loop of both nAChRs and acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) while some ligand-binding capacity is preserved by analogs of this loop, for example, by high-affinity peptide HAP. Here we analyzed the structural organization of these peptide models of ligands and receptors and its role in binding. Thus, fragments of Lynx1 loop II, loop C from the AChBP and HAP were synthesized in linear and Cys-cyclized forms and structurally (CD and NMR) and functionally (radioligand assay on nAChR) characterized. Connecting the C- and N-termini by disulfide in the ws-Lynx1 fragment stabilized its conformation which became similar to the loop II within the H-NMR structure of ws-Lynx1, the activity being higher than for starting linear fragment but lower than for peptide with free cysteines. Introduced disulfides did not considerably change the structure of HAP and of loop C fragments, the former preserving high affinity for α-bungarotoxin, while, surprisingly, no binding was detected with loop C and its analogs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biom11010001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7821949PMC
December 2020

N-Terminal Tagging with GFP Enhances Selectivity of Agitoxin 2 to Kv1.3-Channel Binding Site.

Toxins (Basel) 2020 12 16;12(12). Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10, 117997 Moscow, Russia.

Recently developed fluorescent protein-scorpion toxin chimeras (FP-Tx) show blocking activities for potassium voltage-gated channels of Kv1 family and retain almost fully pharmacological profiles of the parental peptide toxins (Kuzmenkov et al., Sci Rep. 2016, 6, 33314). Here we report on N-terminally green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged agitoxin 2 (GFP-L2-AgTx2) with high affinity and selectivity for the binding site of Kv1.3 channel involved in the pathogenesis of various (primarily of autoimmune origin) diseases. The basis for this selectivity relates to N-terminal location of GFP, since transposition of GFP to the C-terminus of AgTx2 recovered specific interactions with the Kv1.1 and Kv1.6 binding sites. Competitive binding experiments revealed that the binding site of GFP-L2-AgTx2 overlaps that of charybdotoxin, kaliotoxin 1, and agitoxin 2, the known Kv1.3-channel pore blockers. GFP-L2-AgTx2 was demonstrated to be applicable as a fluorescent probe to search for Kv1.3 pore blockers among individual compounds and in complex mixtures, to measure blocker affinities, and to visualize Kv1.3 distribution at the plasma membrane of Kv1.3-expressing HEK293 cells. Our studies show that definite combinations of fluorescent proteins and peptide blockers can result in considerable modulation of the natural blocker-channel binding profile yielding selective fluorescent ligands of certain channels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/toxins12120802DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7766132PMC
December 2020

Impact of Different Lipid Ligands on the Stability and IgE-Binding Capacity of the Lentil Allergen Len c 3.

Biomolecules 2020 12 13;10(12). Epub 2020 Dec 13.

Science-Educational Center, M.M. Shemyakin and Yu. A. Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, 117997 Moscow, Russia.

Previously, we isolated the lentil allergen Len c 3, belonging to the class of lipid transfer proteins, cross-reacting with the major peach allergen Pru p 3 and binding lipid ligands. In this work, the allergenic capacity of Len c 3 and effects of different lipid ligands on the protein stability and IgE-binding capacity were investigated. Impacts of pH and heat treating on ligand binding with Len c 3 were also studied. It was shown that the recombinant Len c 3 (rLen c 3) IgE-binding capacity is sensitive to heating and simulating of gastroduodenal digestion. While being heated or digested, the protein showed a considerably lower capacity to bind specific IgE in sera of allergic patients. The presence of lipid ligands increased the thermostability and resistance of rLen c 3 to digestion, but the level of these effects was dependent upon the ligand's nature. The anionic lysolipid LPPG showed the most pronounced protective effect which correlated well with experimental data on ligand binding. Thus, the Len c 3 stability and allergenic capacity can be retained in the conditions of food heat cooking and gastroduodenal digestion due to the presence of certain lipid ligands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biom10121668DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7763088PMC
December 2020

Platelet function and bleeding in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma patients on ibrutinib.

J Thromb Haemost 2020 10;18(10):2672-2684

City Clinical Hospital named after S.P. Botkin, Moscow, Russia.

Background: Therapy with irreversible Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is associated with bleeding.

Objectives: To propose the predictive markers of such bleeding, as well as mechanisms responsible for decreased bleeding at later therapy stages.

Patients/methods: We investigate platelet functional activity in 50 CLL and 16 MCL patients on ibrutinib using flow cytometry and light transmission aggregometry.

Results: Prior to treatment, both patient groups had decreased platelet counts; impaired aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP); and decreased binding of CD62P, PAC1, and annexin V upon stimulation. Bleeding in patients treated with ibrutinib was observed in 28 (56%) CLL patients, who had decreased aggregation with ADP and platelet count before therapy. Their platelet count on therapy did not change, platelet aggregation with ADP steadily improved, and aggregation with collagen first decreased and then increased in anticorrellation with bleeding. Bleeding in MCL was observed in 10 (62%) patients, who had decreased dense granule release before therapy. ADP and ristocetin induced platelet aggregation in ibrutinib-treated MCL patients increased on therapy, while collagen-induced aggregation evolved similarly to CLL patients.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that ibrutinib-dependent bleeding in CLL patients involves three mechanisms: decreased platelet count (the most important discriminator between bleeding and non-bleeding patients), impaired platelet response to ADP caused by CLL, and inhibition by ibrutinib. Initially, ibrutinib shifts the balance to bleeding, but then it is restored because of the improved response to ADP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.14943DOI Listing
October 2020

Antibacterial activity of cardiotoxin-like basic polypeptide from cobra venom.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2020 02 16;30(3):126890. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10, 117997 Moscow, Russia; Higher School of Economics, ul. Myasnitskaya 20, 101000 Moscow, Russia; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), 9 Institutskiy per., Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 Russia.

Antibacterial activity of the three-finger toxins from cobra venom, including cytotoxin 3 from N. kaouthia, cardiotoxin-like basic polypeptide A5 from N. naja (CLBP), and alpha-neurotoxin from N. oxiana venom, was investigated. All toxins failed to influence Gram-negative bacteria. The most pronounced activity against Bacillus subtilis was demonstrated by CLBP. The latter is ascribed to the presence of additional Lys-residues within the membrane-binding motif of this toxin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2019.126890DOI Listing
February 2020

Platelet function and blood coagulation system status in childhood essential thrombocythemia.

Platelets 2020 Nov 19;31(8):1001-1011. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Oncology and Immunology, Federal Research and Clinical Centre of Pediatric Hematology , Moscow, Russian Federation, Russia.

Childhood essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a rare chronic myeloproliferative disorder. The quality of life of ET patients may decrease as a result of ischemic and hemorrhagic complications of unclear origin. Our goal was to characterize the hemostatic system in children with ET. We genotyped and investigated blood samples from 20 children with ET in a prospective case series study using platelet aggregation, functional flow cytometry (FC) assay and standard clotting assays. Three children had a mutation, 4 had mutations in and 13 were triple-negative. Myelofibrosis in stage 1-2 was detected in 3 children. Three patients had bleeding episodes and seven had ischemic events. Aggregation in response to collagen, adenosine diphosphate, and ristomycin was decreased in all patients. In FC, significant changes in the whole patient group compared to the healthy children control group were decrease in the resting forward scatter and PAC1 binding (activated GPIIb/IIIa) level. For the activated platelets, dense granules release (by mepacrine), PAC1, and GPIIb/IIIa levels were significantly decreased. GPIb/V/IX, -selectin, and phosphatidylserine levels manifested only moderate differences. Forward and side scatter changes in response to stimulation (representing shape change) and dense granules release were significantly lower in the 3 patients with bleeding than in the 17 patients without hemorrhage. Activated partial thromboplastin time was slightly prolonged, prothrombin index was slightly shortened and thrombin time was normal, while fibrinogen was mildly decreased in the ET patients. It could be concluded that the observed platelet function defects could be related to bleeding in ET, and be potentially used as a marker.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09537104.2019.1704710DOI Listing
November 2020

Mechanisms of increased mitochondria-dependent necrosis in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome platelets.

Haematologica 2020 04 5;105(4):1095-1106. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

National Scientific and Practical Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology named after Dmitry Rogachev, Moscow

Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is associated with thrombocytopenia of unclear origin. We investigated real-time cytosolic calcium dynamics, mitochondrial membrane potential and phoszphatidylserine (PS) exposure in single fibrinogen-bound platelets using confocal microscopy. The WAS platelets had higher resting calcium levels, more frequent spikes, and their mitochondria more frequently lost membrane potential followed by PS exposure (in 22.9% of platelets 3.9% in controls; <0.001) after the collapse of the last mitochondria. This phenomenon was inhibited by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor cyclosporine A, as well by xestospongin C and lack of extracellular calcium. Thapsigargin by itself caused accelerated cell death in the WAS platelets. The number of mitochondria was predictive of PS exposure: 33% of platelets from WAS patients with fewer than five mitochondria exposed PS, while only 12% did among those that had five or more mitochondria. Interestingly, healthy donor platelets with fewer mitochondria also more readily became procoagulant upon PAR1/PAR4 stimulation. Collapse of single mitochondria led to greater cytosolic calcium increase in WAS platelets if they had one to three mitochondria compared with platelets containing higher numbers. A computer systems biology model of platelet calcium homeostasis showed that smaller platelets with fewer mitochondria could have impaired calcium homeostasis because of higher surface-to-volume ratio and greater metabolic load, respectively. There was a correlation (C=0.81, <0.02) between the mean platelet size and platelet count in the WAS patients. We conclude that WAS platelets readily expose PS via a mitochondria-dependent necrotic mechanism caused by their smaller size, which could contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2018.214460DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7109739PMC
April 2020

Flow cytometry for pediatric platelets.

Platelets 2019 4;30(4):428-437. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

a Cellular Hemostasis and Thrombosis Lab , National Medical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology named after Dmitry Rogachev, Russian Ministry of Healthcare , Moscow , Russian Federation.

The ability of platelets to carry out their hemostatic function can be impaired in a wide range of inherited and acquired conditions: trauma, surgery, inflammation, pre-term birth, sepsis, hematological malignancies, solid tumors, chemotherapy, autoimmune disorders, and many others. Evaluation of this impairment is vitally important for research and clinical purposes. This problem is particularly pronounced in pediatric patients, where these conditions occur frequently, while blood volume and the choice of blood collection methods could be limited. Here we describe a simple flow cytometry-based screening method of comprehensive whole blood platelet function testing that was validated for a range of pediatric and adult samples (n = 31) in the hematology hospital setting including but not limited to: classic inherited platelet function disorders (Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier, Wiscott-Aldrich, and Hermasky-Pudlak syndromes, MYH9-dependent thrombocytopenia), healthy and pre-term newborns, acute and chronic immune thrombocytopenia, chronic lympholeukemia, effects of therapy on platelet function, etc. The method output includes levels of forward and side scatter, levels of major adhesion and aggregation glycoproteins Ib and IIb-IIIa, active integrins' level based on PAC-1 binding, major alpha-granule component P-selectin, dense granule function based on mepacrine uptake and release, and procoagulant activity quantified as a percentage of annexin V-positive platelets. This analysis is performed for both resting and dual-agonist-stimulated platelets. Preanalytical and analytical variables are provided and discussed. Parameter distribution within the healthy donor population for adults (n = 72) and children (n = 17) is analyzed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09537104.2018.1513473DOI Listing
May 2019

Improving therapeutic potential of antibacterial spider venom peptides: coarse-grain molecular dynamics guided approach.

Future Med Chem 2018 10 14;10(19):2309-2322. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 16/10 Miklukho-Maklaya str., Moscow, 117997 Russia.

Aim: Spider venom is a rich source of antibacterial peptides, whose hemolytic activity is often excessive.

Methodology: How to get rid of it? Using latarcins from Lachesana tarabaevi and oxyopinin Oxt 4a from Oxyopes takobius spider venoms we performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of these peptides in the presence of lipid bilayers, mimicking erythrocyte membranes. This identified hemolytically active fragments within Oxt 4a and latarcins. Then, we synthesized five 20-residue peptides, containing different parts of the Oxt 4a and latarcin-1 sequence, carrying mutations within the identified regions.

Conclusion: The antibacterial and hemolytic tests suggested that the three of the synthesized peptides demonstrated substantial decrease in hemolytic activity, retaining, or even exceeding antibacterial potential of the parent peptides.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/fmc-2018-0170DOI Listing
October 2018

Targeting HER2-breast tumors with scFv-decorated bimodal nanoprobes.

J Nanobiotechnology 2018 Feb 21;16(1):18. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

EA6295 'Nanomédicaments et Nanosondes', Université de Tours, 37200, Tours, France.

Background: Recent advances in nanomedicine have shown the great interest of active targeting associated to nanoparticles. Single chain variable fragments (scFv) of disease-specific antibodies are very promising targeting entities because they are small, not immunogenic and able to bind their specific antigens. The present paper is devoted to biological properties in vitro and in vivo of fluorescent and pegylated iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs-Cy-PEG-scFv) functionalized with scFv targeting Human Epithelial growth Receptor 2 (HER2).

Results: Thanks to a site-selective scFv conjugation, the resultant nanoprobes demonstrated high affinity and specific binding to HER2 breast cancer cells. The cellular uptake of SPIONs-Cy-PEG-scFv was threefold higher than that for untargeted PEGylated iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs-Cy-PEG) and is correlated to the expression of HER2 on cells. In vivo, the decrease of MR signals in HER2+ xenograft tumor is about 30% at 24 h after the injection.

Conclusions: These results all indicate that SPIONs-Cy-PEG-scFv are relevant tumor-targeting magnetic resonance imaging agents, suitable for diagnosis of HER2 overexpressing breast tumor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12951-018-0341-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5820783PMC
February 2018

A novel bacteriochlorin-styrylnaphthalimide conjugate for simultaneous photodynamic therapy and fluorescence imaging.

Phys Chem Chem Phys 2017 Nov;19(44):30195-30206

A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds of Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991, Vavilova str. 28, Moscow, Russia.

Propargyl-15,17-dimethoxy-13-amide of bacteriochlorin e (BChl) and a 4-(4-N,N-dimethylaminostyryl)-N-alkyl-1,8-naphthalimide bearing azide group in the N-alkyl fragment were conjugated by the copper(i)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to produce a novel dyad compound BChl-NI for anticancer photodynamic therapy (PDT) combining the modalities of a photosensitizer (PS) and a fluorescence imaging agent. A precise photophysical investigation of the conjugate in solution using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy revealed that the presence of the naphthalimide (NI) fragment does not decrease the photosensitizing ability of the bacteriochlorin (BChl) core as compared with BChl; however, the fluorescence of naphthalimide is completely quenched due to resonance energy transfer (RET) to BChl. It has been shown that the BChl-NI conjugate penetrates into human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, and accumulates in the cytoplasm where it has a mixed granular-diffuse distribution. Both NI and BChl fluorescence in vitro provides registration of bright images showing perfectly intracellular distribution of BChl-NI. The ability of NI to emit light upon excitation in imaging experiments has been found to be due to hampering of RET as a result of photodestruction of the energy acceptor BChl unit. Phototoxicity studies have shown that the BChl-NI conjugate is not toxic for A549 cells at tested concentrations (<8 μM) without light-induced activation. At the same time, the concentration-dependent killing of cells is observed upon the excitation of the bacteriochlorin moiety with red light that occurs due to reactive oxygen species formation. The presented data demonstrate that the BChl-NI conjugate is a promissing dual function agent for cancer diagnostics and therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7cp04449fDOI Listing
November 2017

Bleeding tendency and platelet function during treatment with romiplostim in children with severe immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

Int J Hematol 2017 Jun 7;105(6):841-848. Epub 2017 Mar 7.

National Scientific and Practical Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, 117198, Moscow, Russia.

It has been suggested that platelet function in chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) may be abnormal. Thrombopoietin mimetics used for treatment can affect it, but the data remain limited. We investigated platelet function of 20 children diagnosed with severe ITP (aged 1-16 years, 12 females and eight males). Platelet functional activity in whole blood was characterized by flow cytometry before and after stimulation with SFLLRN plus collagen-related peptide. Levels of CD42b, PAC1, and CD62P, but not CD61 or annexin V, were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in resting platelets of patients before treatment compared with healthy donors. On average, PAC1 and CD62P in patients after activation were also significantly elevated, although some patients failed to activate integrins. Romiplostim (1-15 μg/kg/week s.c.) was prescribed to seven patients, with clinical improvement in six. Interestingly, one patient had clinical improvement without platelet count increase. Eltrombopag (25-75 mg/day p.o.) was given to four patients, with positive response in one. Others switched to romiplostim, with one stable positive response, one unstable positive response, and one non-responding. Platelet quality improved with romiplostim treatment, and their parameters approached the normal values. Our results suggest that platelets in children with severe ITP are pre-activated and abnormal, but improve with treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12185-017-2207-3DOI Listing
June 2017

Folic acid-capped PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles enter cancer cells mostly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis.

Biochim Biophys Acta Gen Subj 2017 Jun 2;1861(6):1578-1586. Epub 2016 Dec 2.

Université François Rabelais de Tours, EA 6295 Nanomédicaments et Nanosondes, UFR des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, 31 avenue Monge, F-37200 Tours, France. Electronic address:

Background: This work is focused on mechanisms of uptake in cancer cells of rationally designed, covalently assembled nanoparticles, made of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), fluorophores (doxorubicin or Nile Blue), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and folic acid (FA), referred hereinafter as SFP-FA.

Methods: SFP-FA were characterized by DLS, zetametry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The SFP-FA uptake in cancer cells was monitored using fluorescence-based methods like fluorescence-assisted cell sorting, CLSM with single-photon and two-photon excitation. The SFP-FA endocytosis was also analyzed with electron microscopy approaches: TEM, HAADF-STEM and EELS.

Results: The SFP-FA have zeta potential below -6mW and stable hydrodynamic diameter close to 100nm in aqueous suspensions of pH range from 5 to 8. They contain ca. 109 PEG-FA, 480 PEG-OCH and 22-27 fluorophore molecules per SPION. The fluorophores protected under the PEG shell allows a reliable detection of intracellular NPs. SFP-FA readily enter into all the cancer cell lines studied and accumulate in lysosomes, mostly via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, whatever the FR status on the cells.

Conclusions: The present study highlights the advantages of rational design of nanosystems as well as the possible involvement of direct molecular interactions of PEG and FA with cellular membranes, not limited to FA-FR recognition, in the mechanisms of their endocytosis.

General Significance: Composition, magnetic and optical properties of the SFP-FA as well their ability to enter cancer cells are promising for their applications in cancer theranosis. Combination of complementary analytical approaches is relevant to understand the nanoparticles behavior in suspension and in contact with cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbagen.2016.11.045DOI Listing
June 2017

Fluorescent system based on bacterial expression of hybrid KcsA channels designed for Kv1.3 ligand screening and study.

Anal Bioanal Chem 2013 Mar 11;405(7):2379-89. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10, 117997 Moscow, Russia.

Human voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 is an important pharmacological target for the treatment of autoimmune and metabolic diseases. Increasing clinical demands stipulate an active search for efficient and selective Kv1.3 blockers. Here we present a new, reliable, and easy-to-use analytical system designed to seek for and study Kv1.3 ligands that bind to the extracellular vestibule of the K(+)-conducting pore. It is based on Escherichia coli spheroplasts with the hybrid protein KcsA-Kv1.3 embedded into the membrane, fluorescently labeled Kv1.3 blocker agitoxin-2, and confocal laser scanning microscopy as a detection method. This system is a powerful alternative to radioligand and patch-clamp techniques. It enables one to search for Kv1.3 ligands both among individual compounds and in complex mixtures, as well as to characterize their affinity to Kv1.3 channel using the "mix and read" mode. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we performed characterization of several known Kv1.3 ligands, tested nine spider venoms for the presence of Kv1.3 ligands, and conducted guided purification of a channel blocker from scorpion venom.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00216-012-6655-6DOI Listing
March 2013

Recombinant Kv channels at the membrane of Escherichia coli bind specifically agitoxin2.

J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 2009 Mar 23;4(1):83-91. Epub 2008 Jul 23.

Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10, 117997 Moscow, Russia.

Potassium voltage-gated channels (Kv) are considered as molecular targets in a number of serious neuronal, immune, and cardiac disorders. Search for efficient low-molecular weight modulators of Kv channel function provides a basis for the development of an appropriate therapy for various Kv-mediated diseases. We report here on a new bacterial cell-based system, which is suitable for study of interactions between ligands and ligand-binding sites of eukaryotic Kv1.3 and Kv1.1 channels. To create this system, high-level expression of KcsA-Kv1.3 and KcsA-Kv1.1 hybrid proteins (ligand-binding sites of Kv1.3 or Kv1.1 fused with prokaryotic KcsA potassium channel) was achieved in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. An efficient procedure of E. coli conversion to intact spheroplasts was developed. We demonstrate that fluorescently labeled agitoxin 2 binds specifically to high-affinity and lower-affinity sites of KcsA-Kv1.3 and KcsA-Kv1.1, respectively, at the membrane of spheroplasts. Number of binding sites per cell is estimated to be (1.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(5) and (0.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(5) for KcsA-Kv1.3- and KcsA-Kv1.1-presenting cells, respectively, that allows reliable detection of ligand-receptor interactions by confocal laser scanning microscopy. This bacterial cell-based system is intended for screening of ligands to membrane-embedded pharmaceutical targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11481-008-9116-4DOI Listing
March 2009
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