Publications by authors named "Anah Soble"

2 Publications

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Variable inbreeding depression may explain associations between the mating system and herbicide resistance in the common morning glory.

Mol Ecol 2021 Feb 19. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Inbreeding depression is a central parameter underlying mating system variation in nature and one that can be altered by environmental stress. Although a variety of systems show that inbreeding depression tends to increase under stressful conditions, we have very little understanding across most organisms how the level of inbreeding depression may change as a result of adaptation to stressors. In this work we examined the potential that inbreeding depression varied among lineages of Ipomoea purpurea artificially evolved to exhibit divergent levels of herbicide resistance. We examined inbreeding depression in a variety of fitness-related traits in both the growth chamber and in the field, and paired this work with an examination of gene expression changes. We found that, while inbreeding depression was present across many of the traits, lineages artificially selected for increased herbicide resistance often showed no evidence of inbreeding depression in the presence of herbicide, and in fact, showed evidence of outbreeding depression in some traits compared to nonselected control lines and lineages selected for increased herbicide susceptibility. Further, at the transcriptome level, the resistant selection lines had differing patterns of gene expression according to breeding type (inbred vs. outcrossed) compared to the control and susceptible selection lines. Our data together indicate that inbreeding depression may be lessened in populations that are adapting to regimes of strong selection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15852DOI Listing
February 2021

Attraction of to House Sparrows Is Influenced by Host Age but Not Uropygial Gland Secretions.

Insects 2018 Sep 25;9(4). Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Oberlin College, Oberlin OH 44074, USA.

serves as the endemic vector of West Nile virus (WNV) in eastern North America, where house sparrows (HOSP, ) serve as a reservoir host. We tested the hypotheses that: (1) Attraction of to HOSP is influenced by bird age and (2) that age-specific variation in chemical profiles of bird uropygial gland secretions informs this choice. We conducted mosquito choice trials in an olfactometer and found that were more often attracted to adult sparrows over nestlings, however, they demonstrated no preference for adults over fledglings. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry we observed age-specific differences in the semi-volatile chemical profiles of house sparrow uropygial gland secretions. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no significant difference in mosquito feeding preference between the secretions of adults and those of either nestlings or fledglings. We suggest that other chemical cues influence the feeding preference of , either independently of uropygial gland secretions, or synergistically with them.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/insects9040127DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6315329PMC
September 2018