Publications by authors named "Ana Pulido"

5 Publications

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Prognostic value of lung ultrasound in chronic stable ambulatory heart failure patients.

Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) 2020 Aug 26. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

Servei de Cardiologia, Unitat d'Insuficiència Cardiaca, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Departament de Medicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; CIBERCV, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

Introduction And Objectives: The role of lung ultrasound (LUS) in acute heart failure (HF) has been widely studied, but little is known about its usefulness in chronic HF. This study assessed the prognostic value of LUS in a cohort of chronic HF stable ambulatory patients.

Methods: We included consecutive outpatients who attended a scheduled follow-up visit in a HF clinic. LUS was performed in situ. The operators were blinded to clinical data and examined 8 thoracic areas. The sum of B-lines across all lung zones and the quartiles of this addition were used for the analyses. Linear regression and Cox regression analyses were performed. The main clinical outcomes were a composite of all-cause death or hospitalization for HF and mortality from any cause.

Results: A total of 577 individuals were included (72% men; 69± 12 years). The mean number of B-lines was 5±6. During a mean follow-up of 31±7 months, 157 patients experienced the main clinical outcome and 111 died. Having ≥ 8 B-lines (Q4) doubled the risk of experiencing the composite primary event (P <.001) and increased the risk of death from any cause by 2.6-fold (P <.001). On multivariate analysis, the total sum of B-lines remained independent predictive factor of the composite endpoint (HR, 1.04; 95%CI, 1.02-1.06; P=.002) and of all-cause death (HR, 1.04; 95%CI, 1.02-1.07; P=.001), independently of whether or not N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) was included in the model (P=.01 and P=.008, respectively), with a 3% to 4% increased risk for each 1-line addition.

Conclusions: LUS identified patients with stable chronic HF at high risk of death or HF hospitalization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rec.2020.07.006DOI Listing
August 2020

Utility of Flexible Bronchoscopy for Airway Foreign Bodies Removal in Adults.

J Clin Med 2020 May 10;9(5). Epub 2020 May 10.

Secció de Pneumologia, Hospital Universitari Sant Joan d'Alacant, Ctra Alacant-València s/n, 03550 Sant Joan d'Alacant, Spain.

Foreign body aspiration is relatively infrequent in adults. Airway foreign bodies (AFBs) can be removed by flexible bronchoscopy (FB) or rigid bronchoscopy (RB). We performed a retrospective analysis of FBs performed in our centre over a 25 year period, focusing on the procedures that revealed an AFB during the examination stage. We recorded demographic data, clinical characteristics and radiological and bronchoscopic findings. During the study period, 12,588 FBs were performed in adults. Airway foreign bodies were identified in 32 of these cases, giving a prevalence of 0.25%. The most frequent clinical presentation was cough, sputum and fever. The most frequent radiological findings were alveolar infiltrates and atelectasis. In 94% of cases, AFBs were removed successfully by FB; RB was necessary in only 6% of cases. There were no FB-related complications. The most common AFB location was the right bronchial tree (69%). We classified AFBs as organic (85%: animal 57%; vegetable 28%), inorganic (6%) and iatrogenic (9%). Bronchial infection occurred in 51% of cases, and spp. was the most common causal microorganism. In conclusion, AFBs are a rare entity with nonspecific clinical presentation, most AFBs were organic, and FB is a safe and effective method for AFB removal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051409DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7290307PMC
May 2020

Intervention to reduce the incidence of surgical site infection in spine surgery.

Am J Infect Control 2020 05 7;48(5):550-554. Epub 2019 Nov 7.

Faculty of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain; Preventive Medicine Department, Germans Trias i Pujol University Hospital, Badalona, Spain.

Background: This study examines the incidence, characteristics, and risk factors of surgical site infections (SSIs) after spine surgery and evaluates the efficacy of a preventive intervention.

Methods: This was a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest study in patients undergoing spinal surgery in an orthopedic surgery department from December 2014 to November 2016. Based on the results of the study, we revised the preventive protocol with modification of wound dressing, staff training, and feedback. SSI rates were compared between the pre-intervention (December 2014 to November 2015) and post-intervention (December 2015 to November 2016) periods. The risk factors were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results: Of the 139 patients included, 14 cases of SSI were diagnosed, with a significant decrease in the incidence of SSIs from the pre-intervention period to the post-intervention period (19.4% vs 2.6%; P = .001). The etiology was known in 13 cases, with enteric flora being predominant in the pre-intervention group. Univariate analysis showed that age, body mass index, days until sitting and ambulation, and incontinence were statistically significant risk factors. After multivariate analysis, only body mass index and days until ambulation remained significant. When the effect of intervention was adjusted with other risk factors, this variable remained statistically significant.

Conclusions: An intervention that includes modification of wound dressing and early mobilization, as well as staff awareness training, monitoring, and feedback, allowed a significant reduction in the incidence of SSI following spinal surgery, particularly infections caused by enteric flora.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2019.09.007DOI Listing
May 2020

Inonotosis in Patient with Hematologic Malignancy.

Emerg Infect Dis 2018 01;24(1):180-182

We report a lung-invasive fungal disease with possible cutaneous needle tract seeding in a patient with a febrile neutropenia caused by the Basidiomycetes mold Inonotus spp. Although rare, Inonotus spp. should be added to the list of microorganisms causing invasive fungal disease in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2401.171265DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5749471PMC
January 2018