Publications by authors named "Ana Pastor"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Local intracoronary fibrinolysis in acute myocardial infarction of ectatic coronary arteries in the post-abciximab era.

Cardiovasc Revasc Med 2021 Jan 14. Epub 2021 Jan 14.

Clinical Cardiology, Hospital Universitario HM Sanchinarro, HM Hospitales, Madrid, Spain.

Percutaneous intervention in the context of coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is penalized with no-reflow phenomenon. The glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa-inhibitor abciximab was the most accepted method for pharmacology thrombus resolution in this scenario, nevertheless, this agent was recently withdrawn. We describe 5 patients treated with local intracoronary fibrinolysis administrated through predesigned catheters in the setting of AMI and CAE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carrev.2021.01.005DOI Listing
January 2021

Acute paraplegia as a presentation of acute aortic occlusion.

Radiol Case Rep 2021 Mar 22;16(3):531-533. Epub 2020 Dec 22.

Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Distrital da Figueira da Foz, Rua do Hospital, 3094-001, Figueira da Foz, Coimbra, Portugal.

Acute aortic occlusion is a rare life-threatening event. We present a case of a heavy smoking, 54-year-old man who was admitted in the emergency room with sudden paraplegia, associated to severe lower back and lower limbs pain. A neurologic examination showed paralysis of the lower limbs and cold lower extremities. The pedal and femoral pulses were absent. A computed tomography revealed occlusion of the mesenteric superior artery, abdominal aorta, and both iliac arteries. Despite medical treatment, the patient died before evaluation of vascular surgery. Paraplegia is a rare presentation of acute aortic occlusion and clinicians should be alert to make an early intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2020.12.036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7770448PMC
March 2021

Defining the multiplicity and time of infection for the production of Zaire Ebola virus-like particles in the insect cell-baculovirus expression system.

Vaccine 2019 11 28;37(47):6962-6969. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Departamento de Medicina Molecular y Bioprocesos, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ave. Universidad 2001, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62210, Mexico. Electronic address:

The Ebola virus disease is a public health challenge. To date, the only available treatments are medical support or the emergency administration of experimental drugs. The absence of licensed vaccines against Ebola virus impedes the prevention of infection. Vaccines based on recombinant virus-like particles (VLP) are a promising alternative. The Zaire Ebola virus serotype (ZEBOV) is the most aggressive with the highest mortality rates. Production of ZEBOV-VLP has been accomplished in mammalian and insect cells by the recombinant coexpression of three structural proteins, the glycoprotein (GP), the matrix structural protein VP40, and the nucleocapsid protein (NP). However, specific conditions to manipulate protein concentrations and improve assembly into VLP have not been determined to date. Here, we used a design of experiments (DoE) approach to determine the best MOI and TOI for three recombinant baculoviruses: bac-GP, bac-VP40 and bac-NP, each coding for one of the main structural proteins of ZEBOV. We identified two conditions where the simultaneous expression of the three recombinant proteins was observed. Interestingly, a temporal and stoichiometric interplay between the three structural proteins was observed. VP40 was required for the correct assembly of ZEBOV-VLP. High NP concentrations reduced the accumulation of GP, which has been reported to be necessary for inducing a protective immune response. Electron microscopy showed that the ZEBOV-VLP produced were morphologically similar to the native virus micrographs previously reported in the literature. A strategy for producing ZEBOV in insect cells, which consists in using a high MOI of bac-VP40 and bac-GP, and reducing expression of NP, either by delaying infection or reducing the MOI of bac-NP, was the most adequate for the production of VLP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.06.029DOI Listing
November 2019

BENEFITS OF SPECIALIZED CARE IN A SPECIFIC FRAILTY UNIT.

Enferm Intensiva 2019 Apr - Jun;30(2):45-46

Servicio de Medicina Interna del Hospital Rey Juan Carlos (Móstoles).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enfi.2019.03.001DOI Listing
January 2020

Residual shunt diagnosed with 4D flow after reparation of post-infarct ventricular septal defect.

Eur Heart J 2018 11;39(42):3820

Quirónsalud Madrid University Hospital, Madrid, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehy575DOI Listing
November 2018

Carotid intima-media thickness and hemodynamic parameters: reproducibility of manual measurements with Doppler ultrasound.

Med Ultrason 2015 Jun;17(2):167-74

Radiology Department. University General Hospital Morales Meseguer. Murcia, Spain.

Aims: To evaluate the carotid ultrasound intra- and interobserver agreements in a common clinical scenario when making manual measurements of the intima-media thickness (IMT) and peak systolic (PSV) and end diastolic (EDV) velocities in the common (CCA) and the internal carotid (ICA) arteries.

Material And Methods: Three different experienced operators performed two time-point carotid ultrasounds in 21 patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Each operator measured freehand the CCA IMT three consecutive times in each examination. The CCA and ICA hemodynamic parameters were acquired just once. For our purpose we took the average (IMTmean) and maximum (IMTmax) IMT values. Quantitative variables were analyzed with the t-student, and ANOVA test. Agreements were evaluated with the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC).

Results: IMTmean intraobserver agreement was better on the left (ICC: 0.930-0.851-0.916, operators 1-2-3) than on the right (ICC: 0.789-0.580-0.673, operators 1-2-3). IMTmax agreements (Left ICC: 0.821-0.723-0.853, operators 1-2-3; Right ICC: 0.669-0.421-0.480, operators 1-2-3) were lower and more variable. Interobserver agreements for IMTmean (ICC: 0.852-0.860; first-second ultrasound) and IMTmax (ICC: 0.859-0.835; first-second ultrasound) were excellent on the left, but fair-good and more variable on the right (IMTmean; ICC: 0.680-0.809; first-second ultrasound; IMTmax; 0.694-0.799; first-second ultrasound). Intraobserver agreements were fair-moderate for PSVs and good-excellent for EDVs. Interobserver agreements were good-excellent for both PSVs and EDVs. Overall, 95% confidence intervals were narrower for the left IMTmean and CCA velocities.

Conclusions: Intra and interobserver agreements in carotid ultrasound are variable. In order to improve carotid IMT agreements, IMTmean is preferable over IMTmax.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11152/mu.2013.2066.172.ci-mDOI Listing
June 2015

Protection against live rotavirus challenge in mice induced by parenteral and mucosal delivery of VP6 subunit rotavirus vaccine.

Arch Virol 2015 Aug 29;160(8):2075-8. Epub 2015 May 29.

Vaccine Research Center, University of Tampere Medical School, Biokatu 10, 33520, Tampere, Finland.

Live oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines are part of routine childhood immunization but are associated with adverse effects, particularly intussusception. We have developed a non-live combined RV - norovirus (NoV) vaccine candidate consisting of human RV inner-capsid rVP6 protein and NoV virus-like particles. To determine the effect of delivery route on induction of VP6-specific protective immunity, BALB/c mice were administered a vaccine containing RV rVP6 intramuscularly, intranasally or a combination of both, and challenged with murine RV. At least 65 % protection against RV shedding was observed regardless of delivery route. The levels of post-challenge serum VP6-specific IgA titers correlated with protection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-015-2461-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4532722PMC
August 2015

Shelf-life of fresh blueberries coated with quinoa protein/chitosan/sunflower oil edible film.

J Sci Food Agric 2016 Jan 13;96(2):619-26. Epub 2015 Mar 13.

Centro de Estudios Postcosecha (CEPOC), Facultad de Ciencias Agronómicas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate quinoa protein (Q), chitosan (CH) and sunflower oil (SO) as edible film material as well as the influence of this coating in extending the shelf-life of fresh blueberries stored at 4 °C and 75% relative humidity. These conditions were used to simulate the storage conditions in supermarkets and represent adverse conditions for testing the effects of the coating. The mechanical, barrier, and structural properties of the film were measured. The effectiveness of the coating in fresh blueberries (CB) was evaluated by changes in weight loss, firmness, color, molds and yeast count, pH, titratable acidity, and soluble solids content.

Results: The tensile strength and elongation at break of the edible film were 0.45 ± 0.29 MPa and 117.2% ± 7%, respectively. The water vapor permeability was 3.3 × 10(-12) ± 4.0 × 10(-13) g s(-1) m(-1) Pa(-1). In all of the color parameters CB presented significant differences. CB had slight delayed fruit ripening as evidenced by higher titratable acidity (0.3-0.5 g citric acid 100 g(-1)) and lower pH (3.4-3.6) than control during storage; however, it showed reduced firmness (up to 38%).

Conclusion: The use of Q/CH/SO as a coating in fresh blueberries was able to control the growth of molds and yeasts during 32 days of storage, whereas the control showed an increasing of molds and yeast, between 1.8 and 3.1 log cycles (between 20 and 35 days).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.7132DOI Listing
January 2016

Immune responses elicited against rotavirus middle layer protein VP6 inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo.

Hum Vaccin Immunother 2014 ;10(7):2039-47

a Vaccine Research Center; School of Medicine; University of Tampere; Tampere, Finland.

Rotavirus (RV) is a common cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. Live oral RV vaccines protect against severe RVGE, but the immune correlates of protection are not yet clearly defined. Inner capsid VP6 protein is a highly conserved, abundant, and immunogenic RV protein, and VP6-specific mucosal antibodies, especially IgA, have been implicated to protect against viral challenge in mice. In the present study systemic and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were induced by immunizing BALB/c mice intranasally with a combination of recombinant RV VP6 protein (subgroup II [SGII]) and norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs) used in a candidate vaccine. Following immunization mice were challenged orally with murine RV strain EDIMwt (SG non-I-non-II, G3P10[16]). In order to determine neutralizing activity of fecal samples, sera, and vaginal washes (VW) against human Wa RV (SGII, G1P1A[8]) and rhesus RV (SGI, G3P5B[3]), the RV antigen production was measured with an ELISA-based antigen reduction neutralization assay. Only VWs of immunized mice inhibited replication of both RVs, indicating heterotypic protection of induced antibodies. IgA antibody depletion and blocking experiments using recombinant VP6 confirmed that neutralization was mediated by anti-VP6 IgA antibodies. Most importantly, after the RV challenge significant reduction in viral shedding was observed in feces of immunized mice. These results suggest a significant role for mucosal RV VP6-specific IgA for the inhibition of RV replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results underline the importance of non-serotype-specific immunity induced by the conserved subgroup-specific RV antigen VP6 in clearance of RV infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/hv.28858DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4186038PMC
February 2016

Observing Tacting Increases Uninstructed Tacts in Children with Autism.

Anal Verbal Behav 2014 Jun 30;30(1):62-8. Epub 2013 Dec 30.

Department of Psychology, University of Oviedo, Plaza Feijoo s/n. Despacho 209, 33003 Oviedo, Spain ; Centro Al-Mudarïs, Avda. de los Aguijones, s/n local 3, 14001 Córdoba, Spain.

The effects of observing an adult emitting tacts on children's rate of uninstructed (i.e., "spontaneous") tacts were examined in three children diagnosed with autism. Each participant was exposed to two conditions in four settings each: in condition 1, participants received 20 trials of teacher-initiated interactions in which the child was asked to tact 20 objects during 5 min. Condition 2 was identical to condition 1 except that the teacher also tacted 20 objects interspersed with the 20 tact trials. The number of uninstructed tacts was recorded in both conditions. Children emitted between 1.58 and 2.68 times more uninstructed tacts in condition 2 than in condition 1. These results indicate that teachers' emission of tacts increases the emission of uninstructed tacts in children with autism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40616-013-0003-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4883534PMC
June 2014

Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast extracts containing rotavirus-like particles: a potential veterinary vaccine.

Vaccine 2014 May 1;32(24):2794-8. Epub 2014 Mar 1.

Departamento de Medicina Molecular y Bioprocesos, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 510-3, CP 62250 Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. Electronic address:

Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in many animal species of economic interest. A simple, safe and cost-effective vaccine is required for the control and prevention of rotavirus in animals. In this study, we evaluated the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts containing rotavirus-like particles (RLP) as a vaccine candidate in an adult mice model. Two doses of 1mg of yeast extract containing rotavirus proteins (between 0.3 and 3 μg) resulted in an immunological response capable of reducing the replication of rotavirus after infection. Viral shedding in all mice groups diminished in comparison with the control group when challenged with 100 50% diarrhea doses (DD50) of murine rotavirus strain EDIM. Interestingly, when immunizing intranasally protection against rotavirus infection was observed even when no increase in rotavirus-specific antibody titers was evident, suggesting that cellular responses were responsible of protection. Our results indicate that raw yeast extracts containing rotavirus proteins and RLP are a simple, cost-effective alternative for veterinary vaccines against rotavirus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.02.037DOI Listing
May 2014

The assembly conformation of rotavirus VP6 determines its protective efficacy against rotavirus challenge in mice.

Vaccine 2014 May 25;32(24):2874-7. Epub 2014 Feb 25.

Departamento de Medicina Molecular y Bioprocesos, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ave. Universidad 2001, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62210, Mexico. Electronic address:

Viral protein assemblies have shown to be superior immunogens used in commercial vaccines. However, little is known about the effect of protein assembly structure in immunogenicity and the protection conferred by a vaccine. In this work, rotavirus VP6, a polymorphic protein that assembles into nanotubes, icosahedra (dlRLP) or trimers was used to compare the immune response elicited by three different assemblies. VP6 is the most antigenic and abundant rotavirus structural protein. It has been demonstrated that antibodies against VP6 interfere with the replication cycle of rotavirus, making it a vaccine candidate. Groups of mice were immunized with either nanotubes, dlRLP or trimers and the humoral response (IgG and IgA titers) was measured. Immunized mice were challenged with EDIM rotavirus and protection against rotavirus infection, measured as viral shedding, was evaluated. Immunization with nanotubes resulted in the highest IgG titers, followed by immunization with dlRLP. While immunization with one dose of nanotubes was sufficient to reduce viral shedding by 70%, two doses of dlRLP or trimers were required to obtain a similar protection. The results show that the type of assembly of VP6 results in different humoral responses and protection efficacies against challenge with live virus. This information is important for the design of recombinant vaccines in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.02.018DOI Listing
May 2014

Native T1 mapping in differentiation of normal myocardium from diffuse disease in hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy.

JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2013 Apr 14;6(4):475-84. Epub 2013 Mar 14.

Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the value of native and post-contrast T1 relaxation in the differentiation between healthy and diffusely diseased myocardium in 2 model conditions, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

Background: T1 mapping has been proposed as potentially valuable in the quantitative assessment of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, but no studies to date have systematically evaluated its role in the differentiation of healthy myocardium from diffuse disease in a clinical setting.

Methods: Consecutive subjects undergoing routine clinical cardiac magnetic resonance at King's College London were invited to participate in this study. Groups were based on cardiac magnetic resonance findings and consisted of subjects with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 25) and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 27). Thirty normotensive subjects with low pre-test likelihood of cardiomyopathy, not taking any regular medications and with normal cardiac magnetic resonance findings including normal left ventricular mass indexes, served as controls. Single equatorial short-axis slice T1 mapping was performed using a 3-T scanner before and at 10, 20, and 30 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of gadobutrol. T1 values were quantified within the septal myocardium (T1 native), and extracellular volume fractions (ECV) were calculated.

Results: T1 native was significantly longer in patients with cardiomyopathy compared with control subjects (p < 0.01). Conversely, post-contrast T1 values were significantly shorter in patients with cardiomyopathy at all time points (p < 0.01). ECV was significantly higher in patients with cardiomyopathy compared with controls at all time points (p < 0.01). Multivariate binary logistic regression revealed that T1 native could differentiate between healthy and diseased myocardium with sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 96%, and diagnostic accuracy of 98% (area under the curve 0.99; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.00; p < 0.001), whereas post-contrast T1 values and ECV showed lower discriminatory performance.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that native and post-contrast T1 values provide indexes with high diagnostic accuracy for the discrimination of normal and diffusely diseased myocardium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcmg.2012.08.019DOI Listing
April 2013

Native myocardial T1 mapping by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in subclinical cardiomyopathy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 2013 Mar 12;6(2):295-301. Epub 2013 Feb 12.

Cardiovascular Imaging Department, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, London, UK.

Background: Increased systemic inflammation has been linked to myocardial dysfunction and heart failure in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Accurate detection of early myocardial changes may be able to guide preventive intervention. We investigated whether multiparametric imaging by cardiovascular magnetic resonance can detect differences between controls and asymptomatic SLE patients.

Methods And Results: A total of 33 SLE predominantly female patients (mean age, 40±9 years) underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance for routine assessment of myocardial perfusion, function, and late gadolinium enhancement. T1 mapping was performed in single short-axis slice before and after 15 minutes of gadolinium administration. Twenty-one subjects with a low pretest probability and normal cardiovascular magnetic resonance served as a control group. Both groups had similar left ventricular volumes and mass and normal global systolic function. SLE patients had significantly reduced longitudinal strain (controls versus SLE, -20±2% versus -17±3%; P<0.01) and showed intramyocardial and pericardial late gadolinium enhancement. SLE patients had significantly increased native myocardial T1 (1056±27 versus 1152±46 milliseconds; P<0.001) and extracellular volume fraction (26±5% versus 30±6%; P=0.007) and reduced postcontrast myocardial T1 (454±53 versus 411±62 milliseconds; P=0.01). T1-derived indices were associated with longitudinal strain (r=0.37-0.47) but not with the presence of late gadolinium enhancement. Native myocardial T1 values showed the greatest concordance with the presence of clinical diagnosis of SLE.

Conclusions: In patients with SLE and free of cardiac symptoms, there is evidence of subclinical perimyocardial impairment. We further demonstrate that T1 mapping may have potential to detect subclinical myocardial involvement in patients with SLE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.112.000151DOI Listing
March 2013

Awareness and implementation in daily practice of the S.E.N.-semFYC consensus document on chronic kidney disease.

Nefrologia 2012 ;32(6):797-808

Centro de Salud Isla de Oza. Madrid, Spain.

Background: In 2007, the Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (semFYC) and the Spanish Society of Nephrology (S.E.N.) created a consensus document in order to reduce the variability in clinical practices for the detection, treatment, and referral of cases of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Objectives: To evaluate the level of awareness, dissemination, agreement, and application of the S.E.N.-semFYC consensus document on chronic kidney disease.

Method: Ours was a cross-sectional, descriptive, and observational study carried out among 476 primary health care doctors and nephrologists using a survey.

Results: Of the 326 primary care doctors and 150 nephrologists surveyed, 51.1% and 89.6% respectively knew of the consensus document. A total of 70.8% of nephrologists considered the document to be highly necessary, and were very much in agreement with the content. Primary care doctors placed more value on the practical usefulness of the document (63.2% AP vs. 52.1% nephrologists).The sections that reported the greatest level of unfamiliarity among primary care doctors (>20% of those surveyed) included recommendations regarding the suitability of ultrasound examinations in male patients with CKD older than 60 years of age and in regards to the criteria for patient referral to the nephrology department. The level of application of the recommendations set forth in the document varied widely between the two specialties, with greater compliance among nephrologists. Age, sex, field of medicine, professional experience, the population treated, and health care workload were not significantly associated with differences in awareness, perceived need, or application of the consensus document.

Conclusions: This survey demonstrates that the level of implementation of the S.E.N.-sem- FYC consensus document for CKD has much room for improvement, above all among primary care physicians. The application of this consensus document can improve clinical practice. Several critical aspects have been identified in the evaluation and referral of patients with CKD that must be addressed through the establishment of strategies for disseminating information and continued training for the scientific societies involved in treating these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3265/Nefrologia.pre2012.Sep.11367DOI Listing
December 2013

[The Alliance for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in Spain. A civil commitment to society].

Gastroenterol Hepatol 2012 Mar 23;35(3):109-28. Epub 2012 Feb 23.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common malignant tumor in Spain, when men and women are considered together, and the second leading cause of cancer death. Every week in Spain over 500 cases of CRC are diagnosed, and nearly 260 people die from the disease. Epidemiologic estimations for the coming years show a significant increase in the number of annual cases. CRC is a perfectly preventable tumor and can be cured in 90% of cases if detected in the early stages. Population-based screening programs have been shown to reduce the incidence of CRC and mortality from the disease. Unless early detection programs are established in Spain, it is estimated that in the coming years, 1 out of 20 men and 1 out of 30 women will develop CRC before the age of 75. The Alliance for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in Spain is an independent and non-profit organization created in 2008 that integrates patients' associations, altruistic non-governmental organizations and scientific societies. Its main objective is to raise awareness and disseminate information on the social and healthcare importance of CRC in Spain and to promote screening measures, early detection and prevention programs. Health professionals, scientific societies, healthcare institutions and civil society should be sensitized to this highly important health problem that requires the participation of all sectors of society. The early detection of CRC is an issue that affects the whole of society and therefore it is imperative for all sectors to work together.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gastrohep.2012.01.002DOI Listing
March 2012

Successful removal of a floating thrombus in ascending aorta.

Ann Thorac Surg 2011 May;91(5):e67-9

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain.

Free-floating thrombus in ascending aorta is a rare cause of peripheral embolism with potentially fatal consequences. We report the case of a young patient with syncope and sudden lumbar pain. Computed tomographic scan revealed a large pedunculated floating mass attached to the posterior wall of the ascending aorta, probably responsible of renal embolic infarction; transthoracic echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis. Surgery was urgently performed. The thrombus was excised, and was not related to atherosclerotic disease of the aortic wall. We conclude that once diagnosis is clear, urgent surgery must be considered to avoid any further embolic complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2010.12.011DOI Listing
May 2011

Sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

Rev Esp Cardiol 2011 Feb 28;64(2):150. Epub 2010 Dec 28.

Departamento de Cardiología, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, España.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.recesp.2009.12.001DOI Listing
February 2011

[Factors affecting the control of blood pressure and lipid levels in patients with cardiovascular disease: the PREseAP Study].

Rev Esp Cardiol 2008 Mar;61(3):317-21

Centro de Salud San Blas, Alicante, Universidad Miguel Hernández, San Juan de Alicante, Alicante, España.

The aim of this observational study was to identify factors influencing the control of blood pressure (i.e., <140/90 mmHg, or <130/80 mmHg in diabetic patients) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level (<100 mg/dL) in 1223 patients with cardiovascular disease. Overall, 70.2% of patients were men, and their mean age was 66.4 years. Blood pressure was poorly controlled in 50.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 46.9%-54.8%) and the LDL cholesterol level was poorly controlled in 60.1% (95% CI, 56.3%-63.9%). Determinants of poor blood pressure control were diabetes, hypertension, no previous diagnosis of heart failure, previous diagnosis of peripheral artery disease or stroke, obesity, and no lipid-lowering treatment. Determinants of poor LDL cholesterol control were no lipid-lowering treatment, no previous diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, no antihypertensive treatment, and dyslipidemia. The factors affecting blood pressure control were different from those affecting LDL cholesterol control, an observation that should be taken into account when implementing treatment recommendations for achieving therapeutic objectives in secondary prevention.
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March 2008