Publications by authors named "Ana Luiza Biancardi"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Different clinical manifestations of ocular sporotrichosis in the same patient: an alert to ophthalmologists in nonendemic areas.

Arq Bras Oftalmol 2020 Sep-Oct;83(5):457-458

Instituto Nacional de Infectologia, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5935/0004-2749.20200107DOI Listing
January 2021

Severe Necrotising Toxoplasmic Retinochoroiditis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease in Use of Adalimumab and Azathioprine.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2020 06;26(7):e69-e70

Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izaa105DOI Listing
June 2020

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with mosquito-borne diseases: Chikungunya virus X yellow fever immunization.

Rev Soc Bras Med Trop 2020 27;53:e20190160. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Departamento de Oftalmologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a demyelinating autoimmune neuropathic condition characterized by extensive bilateral and confluent lesions in the cerebral white matter and cerebellum. The basal ganglia and gray matter may also be involved. In most cases, the symptoms are preceded by viral infection or vaccination. In this report, we present a case of ADEM associated with optic neuritis presenting alongside two potential triggering factors: chikungunya virus infection and yellow fever immunization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0160-2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083384PMC
March 2020

Intraocular pressure in patients with human immunodeficiency virus, correlation with TCD4, viral load and demographic characteristics: a case-control study.

Clin Ophthalmol 2019 5;13:1477-1483. Epub 2019 Aug 5.

Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitário Da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590, Brazil.

Purpose: To compare if patients with HIV have lower intraocular pressure than patients without HIV.

Methods: The association of intraocular pressure corrected by pachymetry and the relationship with viral load (VL) and TCD4 cells was studied. A total of 99 patients with HIV (91 who were on regular treatment and in control of the disease - group 1; and 8 who were without treatment - group 2) and 100 controls were studied.

Results: Only age was of statistical significance; the group with HIV without control of the disease was the youngest. There was a decrease of -1.54 mmHg in the IOP of group 1 in relation to the controls and -3.63 mmHg in the IOP of group 2 in relation to the controls.

Conclusion: HIV patients had lower IOP than the control population. However, the relationship between IOP, VL and TCD4 was not found.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S216759DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6689137PMC
August 2019

Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis: The influence of age, number of retinochoroidal lesions and genetic polymorphism for IFN-γ +874 T/A as risk factors for recurrence in a survival analysis.

PLoS One 2019 12;14(2):e0211627. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Laboratory, Oswaldo Cruz Institute -FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Purpose: To analyze risk factors for recurrent toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis.

Design: Single center prospective case series.

Population And Methods: A total of 230 patients with toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis were prospectively followed to assess recurrences. All patients were treated with a specific drug regime for toxoplasmosis in each episode of active retinochoroiditis. Individuals with chronic diseases and pregnant women were excluded. Survival analysis by extended Cox regression model (Prentice-Williams-Peterson counting process model) was performed to evaluate the time between recurrences according to some potential risk factors: age, number of retinochoroidal lesions at initial evaluation, sex and interferon gamma +874 T/A gene polymorphism. Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were provided to interpret the risk effects.

Results: One hundred sixty-two recurrence episodes were observed in 104 (45.2%) patients during follow-up that lasted from 269 to 1976 days. Mean age at presentation was 32.8 years (Standard deviation = 11.38). The risk of recurrence during follow up was influenced by age (HR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.01-1.04) and number of retinochoroidal lesions at the beginning of the study (HR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.07-2.40). Heterozygosis for IFN-γ gene polymorphism at position +874 T/A was also associated with recurrence (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.04-2.14).

Conclusion: The risk of ocular toxoplasmosis recurrence after an active episode increased with age and was significantly higher in individuals with primary lesions, which suggests that individuals with this characteristic and the elderly could benefit from recurrence prophylactic strategies with antimicrobials. Results suggest an association between IFN-γ gene polymorphism at position +874T/A and recurrence.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211627PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372150PMC
November 2019

The optimal time to perform an ophthalmic examination of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

Intest Res 2019 Jan 14;17(1):153-154. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5217/ir.2018.00147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6361020PMC
January 2019

Anterior and Intermediate Uveitis Following Yellow Fever Vaccination with Fractional Dose: Case Reports.

Ocul Immunol Inflamm 2019 28;27(4):521-523. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

a Ophthalmology Department , Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro , Rio de Janeiro , Brazil.

: To describe two cases of anterior and intermediate uveitis following yellow fever vaccination with fractional dose. : Case report. : Case 1: A 35 year-old healthy woman presented with unilateral anterior uveitis 10 days after the yellow fever vaccination. Testing excluded infectious and rheumatic diseases and the episode was fully recovered after a short course of topical treatment. Case 2: A 21 year-old previously healthy woman presented with blurred vision in the left eye (OS) 14 days after the yellow fever vaccination. The ophthalmic examination of the OS revealed intermediated uveitis. Testing excluded infectious and neurological diseases. After six weeks of treatment with oral prednisone, the ocular inflammation had resolved. : Physicians should be aware of the possibility of eye inflammation following the yellow fever vaccination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09273948.2018.1510529DOI Listing
December 2019

The Role of Clinical-Demographic Characteristics in Ophthalmic Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2019 02;25(3):e15-e16

Department of Ophthalmology, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izy159DOI Listing
February 2019

Ophthalmic manifestations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A review.

World J Gastroenterol 2017 Aug;23(32):5836-5848

Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-913, Brazil.

Clinical manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not locally restricted to the gastrointestinal tract, and a significant portion of patients have involvement of other organs and systems. The visual system is one of the most frequently affected, mainly by inflammatory disorders such as episcleritis, uveitis and scleritis. A critical review of available literature concerning ocular involvement in IBD, as it appears in PubMed, was performed. Episcleritis, the most common ocular extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), seems to be more associated with IBD activity when compared with other ocular EIMs. In IBD patients, anterior uveitis has an insidious onset, it is longstanding and bilateral, and not related to the intestinal disease activity. Systemic steroids or immunosuppressants may be necessary in severe ocular inflammation cases, and control of the underlying bowel disease is important to prevent recurrence. Our review revealed that ocular involvement is more prevalent in Crohn's disease than ulcerative colitis, in active IBD, mainly in the presence of other EIMs. The ophthalmic symptoms in IBD are mainly non-specific and their relevance may not be recognized by the clinician; most ophthalmic manifestations are treatable, and resolve without sequel upon prompt treatment. A collaborative clinical care team for management of IBD that includes ophthalmologists is central for improvement of quality care for these patients, and it is also cost-effective.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v23.i32.5836DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5583569PMC
August 2017

Cat-scratch disease.

Ocul Immunol Inflamm 2014 Apr 9;22(2):148-54. Epub 2013 Oct 9.

Fundação Oswaldo Cruz , Rio de Janeiro , Brazil.

Purpose: To discuss the systemic and ocular manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of Bartonella infection.

Method: Review of the literature.

Results: Bartonella are facultative intracellular Gram-negative rods that infect the erythrocytes or endothelial cells and are related to cat scratch disease (CSD). Bartonella henselae infection has localized or systemic features; the ocular diseases related to Bartonella affect 5--10% of patients with CSD. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and laboratory tests. The indication of antibiotic therapy depends on the manifestation of the Bartonella infection, the host immunity and the patient's age.

Conclusion: Physicians should look for Bartonella henselae in cases of follicular conjuntivitis and regional limphadenopathy, neuroretinitis or retinal infiltrates; currently, serological tests can confirm the clinical suspicion of this infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09273948.2013.833631DOI Listing
April 2014

Chronic conjunctivitis related to phthiriasis palpebrarum.

Int Ophthalmol 2012 Oct 16;32(5):467-9. Epub 2012 Jun 16.

Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sacadura Cabral 178, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

We describe a case of chronic conjunctivitis related to phthiriasis palpebrarum. A 36 year-old female presented with gradual pruritus and painless ocular hyperaemia over the previous 3 months. On examination, nasal pterygium, conjunctival hyperaemia, oedema, and mild hypertrophy of the palpebral margin were observed. A slit-lamp examination revealed numerous creamy oval structures approximately 1 mm in diameter localised in the middle area of the lashes, and bloody crusts and a semi-transparent deposit were present in the superior palpebral margin. Based on the observation of numerous nits at the base of the eyelashes and the ectoparasite in the palpebral margin, a diagnosis of phthiriasis palpebrarum was made. The patient was referred to an infectologist for evaluation of other sexually transmitted diseases and examination of other body areas. She was successfully treated with oral ivermectin, shampoo for ciliary hygiene and artificial tears. Other recommendations to avoid re-infestation were made, such as changing, washing and sterilising clothes, towels and sheets daily. This report emphasizes the importance of the correct diagnosis and management of this disease, considered as sexually transmitted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10792-012-9528-2DOI Listing
October 2012

Thrombophilic mutations and risk of retinal vein occlusion.

Arq Bras Oftalmol 2007 Nov-Dec;70(6):971-4

Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

Purpose: The association of retinal vein occlusion and hereditary thrombophilia abnormalities is not established, with controversial results in the literature. This study investigates the association between retinal vein occlusion and three thrombophilic mutations: factor V 1691A (factor V Leiden), prothrombin 20210A (PT 20210A) and homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677T (MTHFR 677TT).

Methods: 55 consecutive retinal vein occlusion patients and 55 controls matched by age, gender and race, were tested for the presence of the following mutations: factor V Leiden, PT 20210A and MTHFR 677TT. The frequencies of the three mutations in cases and controls were compared.

Results: Factor V Leiden was found in 3.6% of patients and in 0% of controls; PT 20210A was found in 1.8% of patients and 3.6% of controls, (matched-pair odds ratio, 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 5.51); MTHFR 677TT was found in 9% of patients and 9% of controls (matched-pair odds ratio, 1; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 3.45). Arterial hypertension was more frequent in patients than controls (matched-pair odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 9.21).

Conclusions: This study suggests that thrombophilic mutations are not risk factors for RVO. Routine investigation of hereditary thrombophilia in these patients is not justified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0004-27492007000600016DOI Listing
August 2008

[Fundus changes evaluation in degenerative myopia].

Arq Bras Oftalmol 2006 Mar-Apr;69(2):203-6. Epub 2006 May 8.

Departamento de Oftalmologia, Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brazil.

Purpose: To evaluate the presence of fundus changes in degenerative myopia.

Methods: Forty patients with refractive error of at least -6.00 diopters were selected for ophthalmologic examination followed by posterior pole photograph and echobiometry.

Results: We studied 57 eyes of 37 patients with refractive error ranging from -6.25 to -28.50 diopters, with mean -14.05, and axial length ranging from 26.06 to 32.86 mm, with mean 28.01. We found a temporal crescent in 36.5% and a peripapillary one in 20% of the eyes. Choroidal vessels were seen in 35% of the eyes. Posterior pole changes were as follow: posterior staphyloma in 10.5%, Fuchs' spots in 3.5% and lacquer cracks in 1.5%. Peripheral retinal examination revealed paving stone chorioretinal atrophy in 17.5%, white without pressure in 10.5%, lattice degeneration in 5%, retinal tears in 3.5% and retinoschisis in 1.5% of the examined eyes.

Conclusions: Fundus changes that lead to decreased vision are common in patients with degenerative myopia. Peripheral retinal examination is very important in these patients due to the increased risk of retinal detachment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0004-27492006000200013DOI Listing
October 2006