Publications by authors named "Amy Roach"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Long-term outcomes after heart transplantation using ex vivo allograft perfusion in standard risk donors: A single-center experience.

Clin Transplant 2022 Jan 14:e14591. Epub 2022 Jan 14.

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Smidt Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Introduction: The Organ Care System (OCS) is an ex vivo perfusion platform for donor heart preservation. Short/mid-term post-transplant outcomes after its use are comparable to standard cold storage (CS). We evaluated long-term outcomes following its use.

Methods: Between 2011 and 2013, 38 patients from a single center were randomized as a part of the PROCEED II trial to receive allografts preserved with CS (n = 19) or OCS (n = 19). Endpoints included 8-year survival, survival free from graft-related deaths, freedom from cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), non-fatal major adverse cardiac events (NF-MACE), and rejections.

Results: Eight-year survival was 57.9% in the OCS group and 73.7% in the CS group (p = .24). Freedom from CAV was 89.5% in the OCS group and 67.8% in the CS group (p = .13). Freedom from NF-MACE was 89.5% in the OCS group and 67.5% in the CS group (p = .14). Eight-year survival free from graft-related death was equivalent between the two groups (84.2% vs. 84.2%, p = .93). No differences in rejection episodes were observed (all p > .5).

Conclusions: In select patients receiving OCS preserved allografts, late post-transplant survival trended lower than those transplanted with an allograft preserved with CS. This is based on a small single-center series, and larger numbers are needed to confirm these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ctr.14591DOI Listing
January 2022

Contemporary Left Ventricular Assist Device Outcomes in an Aging Population: An STS INTERMACS Analysis.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2021 08;78(9):883-894

Kirklin Institute for Research in Surgical Outcomes (KIRSO), Department Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

Background: Survival, functional outcomes, and quality of life after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are ill-defined in elderly patients, and with new-generation devices.

Objectives: This study sought to evaluate survival, functional outcomes, and quality of life after LVAD in contemporary practice.

Methods: Adults receiving durable LVADs between January 1, 2010, and March 1, 2020, were identified from the INTERMACS (Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support) database. The primary outcome was adjusted survival; secondary outcomes included quality of life rated using a visual analogue scale (where 0 represents "worst health" and 100 "best health"); 6-minute walk distance; stroke; device malfunction; and rehospitalization, stratified by patient age. Median follow-up was 15 months (IQR: 6-32 months).

Results: The cohort comprised 68.9% (n = 16,808) patients aged <65 years, 26.3% (n = 6,418) patients aged 65-75 years, and 4.8% (n = 1,182) patients aged >75 years, who were predominantly male (n = 19,119, 78%) and on destination therapy (n = 12,425, 51%). Competing outcomes analysis demonstrated mortality (70% CIs) of 34% (33%-34%), 54% (54%-55%), and 66% (64%-68%) for patients aged <65, 65-75, and >75 years, respectively, which improved during the study in patients aged >75 years. Newer-generation devices were associated with reduced late mortality (HR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.25-0.49). Stroke, device malfunction or thrombosis, and rehospitalizations decreased with increasing age (all P < 0.01). Median 6-minute walk distance increased from 0 feet (IQR: 0-665 feet) to 1,065 feet (IQR: 642-1,313 feet) (P < 0.001), and quality of life improved from 40 (IQR: 15-60) to 75 (IQR: 60-90) (P < 0.001) after LVAD in all age groups.

Conclusions: In elderly patients, LVADs are associated with increased functional capacity, similar improvements in quality of life, and fewer complications compared with younger patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2021.06.035DOI Listing
August 2021

Durable Robotic Mitral Repair of Degenerative Primary Regurgitation With Long-Term Follow-Up.

Ann Thorac Surg 2021 Aug 23. Epub 2021 Aug 23.

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Smidt Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address:

Background: Variation in degenerative mitral morphology may contribute to suboptimal repair rates. This study evaluates outcomes of a standardized mitral repair technique.

Methods: An institutional clinical registry was used to identify 1036 consecutive patients undergoing robotic mitral surgery between 2005 and 2020: 87% (n = 902) had degenerative disease. Calcification, failed transcatheter repair, and endocarditis were excluded, leaving 582 (68%) patients with isolated posterior leaflet and 268 (32%) with anterior or bileaflet prolapse. Standardized repair comprised triangular resection and true-sized flexible band in posterior leaflet prolapse. Freedom from greater than 2+ moderate mitral regurgitation stratified by prolapse location was assessed using competing risk analysis with death as a competing event. Median follow-up was 5.5 (range 0-15) years.

Results: Of patients with isolated posterior leaflet prolapse, 87% (n = 506) had standardized repairs and 13% (n = 76) had additional or nonresectional techniques vs 24% (n = 65) and 76% (n = 203), respectively, for anterior or bileaflet prolapse (P < .001). Adjunctive techniques in the isolated posterior leaflet group included chordal reconstruction (8.6%, n = 50) and commissural sutures (3.4%, n = 20). Overall, median clamp time was 80 (interquartile range, 68-98) minutes, 17 patients required intraoperative re-repair, and 6 required mitral replacement. Freedom from greater than 2+ regurgitation or reintervention at 10 years was 92% for posterior prolapse (vs 83% for anterior or bileaflet prolapse). Anterior or bileaflet prolapse was associated with late greater than 2+ regurgitation (hazard ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-7.0).

Conclusions: Posterior leaflet prolapse may be repaired in greater than 99% of patients using triangular resection and band annuloplasty, with satisfactory long-term durability. Increased risk of complex repairs and inferior durability highlights the value of identifying anterior and bileaflet prolapse preoperatively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2021.07.060DOI Listing
August 2021

Robotic mitral valve repair following failed transcatheter edge-to-edge repair.

Ann Thorac Surg 2021 Jun 28. Epub 2021 Jun 28.

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles, USA. Electronic address:

Mitral valve repair is infrequently performed in patients undergoing corrective surgery for failed mitral transcatheter edge-to-edge repair (TEER) in current US practice. This article describes surgical techniques for reconstructive surgery following failed TEER. A total of nine patients underwent robotic-assisted mitral surgery following failed TEER between 2010 and 2020 at a single center. Repair was completed in 88.9% (n=8) patients and freedom from >2+ mitral regurgitation was 87.5% (n=7) at a median follow up of 1.9 years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2021.05.083DOI Listing
June 2021

The effect of demographic factors and lesion severity on iliac stent patency.

J Vasc Surg 2015 Sep 18;62(3):645-53. Epub 2015 Jun 18.

Division of Vascular Surgery, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Va. Electronic address:

Objective: The aim of our study was to perform a large multivariate analysis to identify demographic, anatomic, or procedural factors that affect iliac artery stent primary patency (PP).

Methods: Patients receiving iliac stents from 2007 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate analysis assessed cohort characteristics and their effect on PP. Variables considered significant (P < .05) were brought forward in the multivariate analysis.

Results: A total of 213 patients underwent primary iliac artery stenting, and 307 limbs were analyzed. The average age was 66 years (range, 38-93 years), 54% were male, and 55% were Caucasian. Indications for procedure were claudication in 68%, rest pain in 20%, and tissue loss in 12%. All TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) II classifications were included: 51% TASC II A, 25% TASC II B, 13% TASC II C, and 11% TASC II D. The treated anatomic locations were 27% isolated external iliac artery (EIA), 56% isolated common iliac artery, and 17% combined common iliac artery and EIA. Multivariate analysis found three factors were correlated with decreased PP: non-Caucasian race (hazard ratio [HR], 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-3.13; P = .025), younger age (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01-1.08; P = .006), and presence of EIA occlusion (HR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.05-3.89; P = .036). Overall, Kaplan-Meier analysis at 1 and 3 years revealed a PP of 86% and 53%, assisted PP of 98% and 89%, and secondary patency of 99% of 98%. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed PP at 1 year for was 91% Caucasian patients vs 77% for non-Caucasian (P = .001). PP was 75% in patients aged <60 years, 86% in patients aged 60-70 years, and 96% in patients aged >70 years, with a significant difference between all groups (P < .001). PP was significantly different for those with and without EIA occlusion (P = .002), with 1-year PP of 71% and 88%, respectively.

Conclusions: In our experience with a large number of iliac interventions, younger age, non-Caucasian race, and EIA occlusion were strong predictors for loss of PP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2015.04.397DOI Listing
September 2015

How to assess phenytoin levels.

Nursing 2005 Nov;35(11):18-9

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center--Presbyterian Shadyside Hospital, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00152193-200511000-00012DOI Listing
November 2005

Whole-grain intake and insulin sensitivity: the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.

Am J Clin Nutr 2003 Nov;78(5):965-71

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, 29208, USA.

Background: Increased intake of whole-grain foods has been related to a reduced risk of developing diabetes and heart disease. One underlying pathway for this relation may be increased insulin sensitivity.

Objective: We assessed the relation between dietary intake of whole grain-containing foods and insulin sensitivity (S(I)).

Design: We evaluated data from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS Exam I, 1992-1994). Usual dietary intakes in 978 middle-aged adults with normal (67%) or impaired (33%) glucose tolerance were ascertained by using an interviewer-administered, validated food-frequency questionnaire. Whole-grain intake (servings per day) was derived from dark breads and high-fiber and cooked cereals. S(I) was assessed by minimal model analyses of the frequently sampled intravenous-glucose-tolerance test. Fasting insulin was measured by using a radioimmunoassay. We modeled the relation of whole-grain intake to log(S(I) + 1) and to log(insulin) by using multivariable linear regression.

Results: On average, IRAS participants consumed 0.8 servings of whole grains/d. Whole-grain intake was significantly associated with S(I) (beta = 0.082, P = 0.0005) and insulin (beta = -0.0646, P = 0.019) after adjustment for demographics, total energy intake and expenditure, smoking, and family history of diabetes. The addition of body mass index and waist circumference attenuated but did not explain the association with S(I). The addition of fiber and magnesium resulted in a nonsignificant association that is consistent with the hypothesis that these constituents account for some of the effect of whole grains on S(I).

Conclusion: Higher intakes of whole grains were associated with increases in insulin sensitivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/78.5.965DOI Listing
November 2003
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