Publications by authors named "Amy Gencarelli"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Behavioral and exercise interventions for sleep dysfunction in the elderly: a brief review and future directions.

Sleep Breath 2021 Feb 25. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Department of Psychology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, 27858, USA.

Purpose: The impact of sleep-related changes and disorders in the geriatric populations are of utmost concern due to health consequences and increased risk of injury as well as injuring others as a result of poor sleep. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of the current state of the literature with regard to sleep, aging, common non-pharmacological interventions, and the potential use of exercise in combination with behavioral interventions.

Methods: Initially, this manuscript focuses on a brief (nonsystematic) review of sleep parameters and physiology that are associated with the aging process. Subsequently, information regarding sleep disorders in the elderly in general, and insomnia in particular are discussed. Last, a brief review of current recommended interventions is provided.

Results: The current major nonpharmacological interventions are described including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I). The potential use of exercise as a safe intervention for poor sleep is discussed. Finally, a call is made for increased research that examines the combination of traditional behavioral interventions with exercise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-021-02329-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7905198PMC
February 2021

A Review of Neuronal Pathways Associated With Consciousness.

J Neurosci Nurs 2021 Feb;53(1):39-43

Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Accurate communication of information regarding fluctuations in level of consciousness is critical. It is, important for nurses to understand terms related to consciousness to appropriately assess and implement plans of care. CONTENT: Although the neurobiology of consciousness is complex and multifaceted, consciousness can be conceptualized as having 2 distinct but interrelated dimensions: arousal and awareness. The different levels of consciousness are thought to fall on a continuum ranging from being fully awake to coma. CONCLUSION: This article focuses on the terms of consciousness, awareness, and arousal along with nursing implications where appropriate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JNN.0000000000000559DOI Listing
February 2021

The Natural History of Insomnia: the incidence of acute insomnia and subsequent progression to chronic insomnia or recovery in good sleeper subjects.

Sleep 2020 06;43(6)

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Study Objectives: The primary aim of the present study was to estimate the incidence per annum of acute insomnia and to what extent those that develop acute insomnia recover good sleep or develop chronic insomnia. Unlike prior studies, a dense-sampling approach was used here (i.e. daily diaries) and this allowed for a more precise detection of acute insomnia and the follow-on states (the transitions to either recovery or chronic insomnia).

Methods: Good sleeper subjects (n = 1,248; 67% female) that were at least 35 years old participated in this prospective study on the natural history of insomnia. Subjects were recruited nationwide and completed online assessments for 1 year. The online measures consisted primarily of daily sleep diaries, as well as weekly/bi-weekly and monthly measures of sleep, stress, and psychological and physical health.

Results: The 1-year incidence rate of acute insomnia was 27.0% (n = 337). The incidence rate of chronic insomnia was 1.8% (n = 23). Of those that developed acute insomnia, 72.4% (n = 244) went on to recover good sleep. 19.3% (n = 65) of the acute insomnia sample continued to experience persistent poor sleep, but did not meet criteria for chronic insomnia.

Conclusions: The incidence rate of acute insomnia (3 or more nights a week for between 2 and 12 weeks) is remarkably high. This said, most incident cases resolve within a few days to weeks. Incident chronic insomnia only occurs in about 2 in 100 individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz299DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7294401PMC
June 2020

The Natural History of Insomnia: the incidence of acute insomnia and subsequent progression to chronic insomnia or recovery in good sleeper subjects.

Sleep 2020 06;43(6)

Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Study Objectives: The primary aim of the present study was to estimate the incidence per annum of acute insomnia and to what extent those that develop acute insomnia recover good sleep or develop chronic insomnia. Unlike prior studies, a dense-sampling approach was used here (i.e. daily diaries) and this allowed for a more precise detection of acute insomnia and the follow-on states (the transitions to either recovery or chronic insomnia).

Methods: Good sleeper subjects (n = 1,248; 67% female) that were at least 35 years old participated in this prospective study on the natural history of insomnia. Subjects were recruited nationwide and completed online assessments for 1 year. The online measures consisted primarily of daily sleep diaries, as well as weekly/bi-weekly and monthly measures of sleep, stress, and psychological and physical health.

Results: The 1-year incidence rate of acute insomnia was 27.0% (n = 337). The incidence rate of chronic insomnia was 1.8% (n = 23). Of those that developed acute insomnia, 72.4% (n = 244) went on to recover good sleep. 19.3% (n = 65) of the acute insomnia sample continued to experience persistent poor sleep, but did not meet criteria for chronic insomnia.

Conclusions: The incidence rate of acute insomnia (3 or more nights a week for between 2 and 12 weeks) is remarkably high. This said, most incident cases resolve within a few days to weeks. Incident chronic insomnia only occurs in about 2 in 100 individuals.
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Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz299DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7294401PMC
June 2020