Publications by authors named "Amy Dominguez"

4 Publications

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Characterizing Family Contextual Factors and Relationships with Child Behavior and Sleep Across the Buffering Toxic Stress Consortium.

Prev Sci 2021 May 26. Epub 2021 May 26.

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO, USA.

The Buffering Toxic Stress (BTS) consortium included six sites in locations that varied widely in racial/ethnic composition and population density. Each site tested a promising parent-child intervention designed to supplement Early Head Start (EHS) services and prevent "toxic stress." To better understand family risk in a large and diverse EHS sample, studies gathered extensive data on family risk exposure, including demographic risk factors (single mother, unemployed, less than high school education or its equivalent, and neighborhood safety), income-to-needs ratio, household resource constraints, perceptions of economic hardship and pressure, caregiver mental health, and caregiver-reported dysfunctional parent-child interactions. Results presented here for all six sites offer context for the more targeted studies in this special issue. Average levels of family characteristics and child behavior varied by site. We also characterized associations between family characteristics, observer-rated child temperament, and child outcomes (i.e., caregiver-reported child behavior problems and behavioral sleep quality), controlling for child age; these relationships were similar across sites. Demographic risk and caregiver mental health problems were positively associated with child behavior problems, with low income-to-needs ratio and increased financial strain relating to behavioral problems in infancy and toddlerhood. Caregiver mental health problems, financial strain, and social and affect temperament dimensions were related to increased behavioral sleep problems. Dysfunctional parent-child interactions and household resource constraints did not demonstrate statistically significant associations. Findings suggest helpful targets to increase effectiveness of parent-child interventions in early childhood on behavior and sleep outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-021-01243-6DOI Listing
May 2021

Improving Caregiver Self-Efficacy and Children's Behavioral Outcomes via a Brief Strength-Based Video Coaching Intervention: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Prev Sci 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Psychology and Center for Translational Neuroscience, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA.

Many existing preventive intervention programs focus on promoting responsive parenting practices. However, these parenting programs are often long in duration and expensive, and meta-analytic evidence indicates that families facing high levels of adversity typically benefit less. Moreover, due to a lack of specification and evaluation of conceptual models, the mechanisms underlying program-related changes in caregivers and their children often remain unclear. The current study aimed to test the effectiveness of a video feedback parenting intervention program, Filming Interactions to Nurture Development (FIND), in improving caregivers' self-efficacy and reducing children's behavioral problems. Data derived from a randomized controlled trial using pretest-posttest design with low-income families reporting high levels of stress (N = 91, children aged 4 to 36 months old, 41.8% female). Families were randomly assigned to an active control or FIND intervention group. Results indicated that caregivers in the FIND group exhibited significant improvement in self-report sense of parenting competence and self-efficacy in teaching tasks. These program impacts were particularly pronounced among caregivers who experience high levels of childhood adversity. Findings provide preliminary support for the FIND conceptual model. Specifically, caregivers' improved self-efficacy in teaching tasks was linked to children's reduced internalizing and externalizing problems (notably, direct FIND intervention effects on children's behavioral outcomes were not observed). Overall, results support the effectiveness of FIND in enhancing caregivers' sense of parenting competence and potentially promoting optimal child development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-021-01251-6DOI Listing
May 2021

Do-gooder derogation in children: the social costs of generosity.

Front Psychol 2015 21;6:1036. Epub 2015 Jul 21.

Department of Psychology, Yale University , New Haven, CT, USA.

Generosity is greatly valued and admired, but can it sometimes be unappealing? The current study investigated 8- to 10-year-old children's (N = 128) preference for generous individuals, and the effects of social comparison on their preferences. In Experiment 1, children showed a strong preference for a generous to a stingy child; however, this preference was significantly reduced in a situation that afforded children a comparison of their own (lesser) generosity to that of another child. In Experiment 2, children's liking for a generous individual was not reduced when that individual was an adult, suggesting that similarity in age influences whether a child engages in social comparison. These findings indicate that, by middle childhood, coming up short in comparison with a peer can decrease one's liking for a generous individual.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508481PMC
August 2015

Collaboration with city agencies: a winning approach to community assessment.

J Nurs Educ 2005 Jul;44(7):323-5

School of Nursing, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555-1029, USA.

Five graduate nursing students made a difference in the health of San Antonio citizens by conducting a community assessment as part of a standard clinical activity in their community health nursing course. The students and their professor were able to effect city-wide change for health protection and promotion through collaboration with the City of San Antonio Planning Department (CSAPD). By compiling information, linking organizations, and speaking before community groups about the importance of a fluoridated water supply, the students generated public interest and momentum, which resulted in a successful vote to add fluoride to the water supply. In addition, they were able to add to the assessment compiled by the Planning Department employees and increase the CSAPD's awareness of health concerns as an important area to assess within a community. The resulting assessment was more comprehensive than it would have been without the students' input. This use of collaboration provides a model other faculty may adopt for community assessment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20050701-07DOI Listing
July 2005