Publications by authors named "Amy C Hartl"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Test of the Bistrategic Control Hypothesis of Adolescent Popularity.

Child Dev 2020 05 25;91(3):e635-e648. Epub 2019 Jun 25.

University of Montreal.

Resource Control Theory (Hawley, 1999) posits a group of bistrategic popular youth who attain status through coercive strategies while mitigating fallout via prosociality. This study identifies and distinguishes this bistrategic popular group from other popularity types, tracing the adjustment correlates of each. Adolescent participants (288 girls, 280 boys; M  = 12.50 years) completed peer nominations in the Fall and Spring of the seventh and eighth grades. Longitudinal latent profile analyses classified adolescents into groups based on physical and relational aggression, prosocial behavior, and popularity. Distinct bistrategic, aggressive, and prosocial popularity types emerged. Bistrategic popular adolescents had the highest popularity and above average aggression and prosocial behavior; they were viewed by peers as disruptive and angry but were otherwise well-adjusted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13269DOI Listing
May 2020

Differences in Internalizing Symptoms Anticipate Adolescent Friendship Dissolution.

J Res Adolesc 2019 12 9;29(4):924-937. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Radboud University.

This study examined the degree to which internalizing symptoms predict adolescent friendship instability. A total of 397 adolescents identified 499 same-sex reciprocated friendships that originated in the seventh grade (M = 13.18 years). Discrete-time survival analyses were conducted with Grade 7 peer, teacher, and self-reports of internalizing symptoms as predictors of friendship dissolution across Grades 8-12. Differences between friends in depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and (for boys only) submissiveness predicted subsequent friendship dissolution. Individual levels of these variables did not predict friendship dissolution, even at extreme or clinical levels. The findings suggest that friendship instability arising from internalizing problems stems from dissimilarity between friends rather than the presence of psychopathological symptoms on the part of one friend.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jora.12432DOI Listing
December 2019

The spread of substance use and delinquency between adolescent twins.

Dev Psychol 2017 Feb 10;53(2):329-339. Epub 2016 Nov 10.

École de psychologie, Université Laval.

This investigation examines the spread of problem behaviors (substance use and delinquency) between twin siblings. A sample of 628 twins (151 male twin pairs and 163 female twin pairs) drawn from the Quebec Newborn Twin Study completed inventories describing delinquency and substance use at ages 13, 14, and 15. A 3-wave longitudinal actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) identified avenues whereby problem behaviors spread from one twin to another. Problems did not spread directly between twins across domains. Instead, 2 indirect pathways were identified: (a) Problems first spread interindividually (between twins) within a behavioral domain, then spread intraindividually (within twins) across behavioral domains (e.g., Twin A delinquency → Twin B delinquency → Twin B substance use); and (b) problems first spread intraindividually (within twins) across behavioral domains, then spread interindividually (between twins) within a behavioral domain (e.g., Twin A delinquency → Twin A substance use → Twin B substance use). Controls for genetic effects, gene-environment correlations, friend substance use and delinquency, and parenting behaviors increase confidence in the conclusion that twin siblings uniquely contribute to the spread of problem behaviors during adolescence. Twin sibling influence is a risk factor for illicit substance use, both because substance use by one twin predicts substance use by the other twin, but also because delinquency in one twin predicts delinquency in the other twin, which then gives rise to greater substance use. (PsycINFO Database Record
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000217DOI Listing
February 2017

Maternal Psychological Control and Its Association with Mother and Child Perceptions of Adolescent Adjustment: More Evidence on the Strength of Shared Perspectives.

J Youth Adolesc 2016 10 21;45(10):2151-63. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

ETR Associates, 100 Enterprise Way, Suite G300, Scotts Valley, CA, 95066, USA.

Mothers and adolescents hold distinct albeit correlated views of their relationship and of one another. The present study focuses on disentangling these independent views. Concurrent associations between maternal psychological control and children's adjustment are examined at two time points in order to identify the degree to which associations reflect (a) views that are shared by mothers and adolescents, and (b) views that are unique to mothers and adolescents. A total of 123 (56 % female) U.S. Latino/a adolescents (M = 10.4 years old at the outset) and their mothers reported on maternal psychological control, children's conduct problems, and children's anxiety, twice within a 5-month period. Data were collected at the close of primary school when the adolescents were in grade 5 and again at the beginning of middle school, when they were in grade 6. Results from conventional correlations indicated that mother- and adolescent-reports yielded similar associations between maternal psychological control and adolescent adjustment. Common fate model analyses partitioned results into variance shared across mother and adolescent reports and variance unique to mother and adolescent reports. Results differed for anxiety and conduct problems. Shared views indicated that greater maternal psychological control was associated with heightened child conduct problems; there were no associations unique to either reporter. In contrast, unique reporter views indicated that greater maternal psychological control was associated with child anxiety; there were no associations involving shared views. Although mother- and adolescent-reports agree that maternal psychological control is correlated with children's adjustment, there is considerable divergence in results when associations are partitioned according to shared and unique reporter views. Associations between maternal psychological control and children's anxiety are more apt to be inflated by same-reporter variance bias than are associations between maternal psychological control and children's conduct problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0467-5DOI Listing
October 2016

Dyadic Instruction for Middle School Students: Liking Promotes Learning.

Learn Individ Differ 2015 Dec;44:33-39

Research Department, ETR Associates.

This study examines whether friendship facilitates or hinders learning in a dyadic instructional setting. Working in 80 same-sex pairs, 160 (60 girls, 100 boys) middle school students ( = 12.13 years old) were taught a new computer programming language and programmed a game. Students spent 14 to 30 ( = 22.7) hours in a programming class. At the beginning and the end of the project, each participant separately completed (a) computer programming knowledge assessments and (b) questionnaires rating their affinity for their partner. Results support the proposition that liking promotes learning: Greater partner affinity predicted greater subsequent increases in computer programming knowledge for both partners. One partner's initial programming knowledge also positively predicted the other partner's subsequent partner affinity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2015.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4681000PMC
December 2015

A Survival Analysis of Adolescent Friendships: The Downside of Dissimilarity.

Psychol Sci 2015 Aug 17;26(8):1304-15. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University.

The present study examined whether adolescent friendships dissolve because of characteristics of friends, differences between friends, or both. Participants were 410 adolescents (201 boys, 209 girls; mean age = 13.20 years) who reported a total of 573 reciprocated friendships that originated in the seventh grade. We conducted discrete-time survival analyses, in which peer nominations and teacher ratings collected in Grade 7 predicted the occurrence and timing of friendship dissolution across Grades 8 to 12. Grade 7 individual characteristics were unrelated to friendship stability, but Grade 7 differences in sex, peer acceptance, physical aggression, and school competence predicted subsequent friendship dissolution. The findings suggest that compatibility is a function of similarity between friends rather than the presence or absence of a particular trait.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797615588751DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4529362PMC
August 2015

Body image mediates negative family climate and deteriorating glycemic control for single adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

Fam Syst Health 2015 Dec 6;33(4):363-71. Epub 2015 Jul 6.

Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University.

Introduction: Glycemic control declines during adolescence, as youth with diabetes struggle with pubertal changes and a changing social world. The present study tests whether body image mediates longitudinal links between family climate and changes in adolescent glycemic control. Mediation was hypothesized for nondating adolescents but not for dating adolescents, because the former are thought to remain more family oriented than the latter.

Method: Participants were German adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (51 girls, 58 boys; M = 15.84 years, SD = 1.44). Participants reported body image and family climate. Physicians assayed blood HbA1c levels (M = 8.22%, SD = 1.80%) to measure glycemic control.

Results: For nondating adolescents, body image mediated associations between family climate and longitudinal changes in glycemic control. Poorer family climate was associated with poorer body image, which predicted deteriorating glycemic control. For dating adolescents, family climate was unassociated with changes in glycemic control.

Discussion: Nondating adolescents may look to parents for feedback on body image, which affects how they manage the challenges of diabetes. Parents and practitioners alike should be alert to the fact that family climate continues to be an important determinant of adolescent adjustment, particularly for those who have not moved into romantic relationships. We know that body image matters to adolescents, but for some youth, body image may be the difference between health and serious physical problems. (PsycINFO Database Record
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fsh0000139DOI Listing
December 2015

Reciprocal Longitudinal Associations Between Adolescent Twin Gambling and Delinquency.

J Gambl Stud 2015 Dec;31(4):1449-61

Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada.

This study examined sibling influence over gambling involvement and delinquency in a sample of 628 twins (151 male dyads, 163 female dyads). Self-reports of gambling involvement and delinquency were collected for each twin at ages 13, 14 and 15 years. Results revealed evidence of between-twin influence. Higher levels of an adolescent's delinquency predicted an increase in his or her co-twin's delinquency from age 13 to age 14 and from age 14 to age 15. In contrast, gambling behavior was unaffected by the co-twin's gambling involvement. Within-twins, higher initial levels of delinquency predicted a subsequent increase in gambling behavior from age 13 to age 14 and again from age 14 to age 15, and higher initial levels of gambling involvement predicted an increase in delinquency from age 14 to age 15. Between and within siblings effects are discussed in light of the scant literature on (a) sibling influence on gambling, and (b) the links between gambling and delinquency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10899-014-9487-9DOI Listing
December 2015

Genetic and environmental influences on gambling and substance use in early adolescence.

Behav Genet 2014 Jul 14;44(4):347-55. Epub 2014 May 14.

University of Montreal, Montréal, QC, Canada,

This study examined the genetic and environmental architecture of early gambling involvement and substance use to determine whether genetic or environmental factors that contribute to substance use also put young adolescents at risk for early involvement in gambling. Self-reports of substance use and gambling involvement were collected at age 13 years from 279 Monozygotic and Dizygotic twin pairs. Univariate ACE modeling revealed that genetic and nonshared environmental factors almost equally accounted for gambling involvement, with no contribution from shared environmental factors. In contrast, both shared and nonshared environmental factors played important roles in substance use; the contribution of genetic factors was also substantial. Bivariate analyses identified a significant, albeit modest, overlap between the genetic influence on gambling involvement and the genetic influence on substance use. The results shed light on the etiology of early gambling involvement and substance use, suggesting that preventive interventions targeting common risk factors may also need to be complemented by modules that are specific to each behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10519-014-9658-6DOI Listing
July 2014

Understanding loneliness during adolescence: developmental changes that increase the risk of perceived social isolation.

J Adolesc 2013 Dec 15;36(6):1261-8. Epub 2013 Jul 15.

Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA.

Loneliness is typically defined in terms of feeling states. In this review, we take a somewhat different approach, describing loneliness in terms of perceived social isolation. Vulnerabilities to perceived social isolation differ across the lifespan. Unique properties of adolescence are identified that carry special risk for perceived social isolation. These include (but are not limited to) developmental changes in companions, developmental changes in autonomy and individuation, identity exploration, cognitive maturation, developmental changes in social perspective taking, and physical maturation. Scholars are encouraged to consider loneliness through the lens of perceived social isolation so as to better understand how the experience of physical isolation varies across adolescence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2013.06.003DOI Listing
December 2013

Declining metabolic control and decreasing parental support among families with adolescents with diabetes: the risk of restrictiveness.

J Pediatr Psychol 2013 Jun 5;38(5):518-30. Epub 2013 Apr 5.

University of Mainz, Department of Psychology, Wallstrasse 3-6, 55112, Mainz, Germany.

Unlabelled: Background For children with diabetes, metabolic control typically declines across the adolescent years.

Objective: The longitudinal interplay between supportive relationships with parents and metabolic control were investigated in families that differ in parents' restrictiveness.

Method: The time-dependent links between perceived parental social support and metabolic control were investigated in a sample of 109 German adolescents with diabetes. 3 waves of data were collected at annual intervals; metabolic control (indexed by HbA1c) was assayed by physicians annually.

Results: Family restrictiveness moderated longitudinal associations between metabolic control and perceived social support. For adolescents reporting high family restrictiveness, poorer initial metabolic control predicted greater subsequent declines in perceived parent social support, and lower initial perceived parental social support predicted greater subsequent deterioration in metabolic control.

Conclusion: The findings add to the growing body of work suggesting that restrictiveness is a risk factor that exacerbates problems associated with low perceived parental support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jst006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3666117PMC
June 2013