Publications by authors named "Amy B Christie"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Association of Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System Inhibitors and Outcomes of Hospitalized Patients With COVID-19.

Crit Care Med 2022 Jul 27. Epub 2022 Jul 27.

Biomedical and Behavioral Methodology Core, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK.

Objectives: To determine the association of prior use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASIs) with mortality and outcomes in hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Design: Retrospective observational study.

Setting: Multicenter, international COVID-19 registry.

Subjects: Adult hospitalized COVID-19 patients on antihypertensive agents (AHAs) prior to admission, admitted from March 31, 2020, to March 10, 2021.

Interventions: None.

Measurements And Main Results: Data were compared between three groups: patients on RAASIs only, other AHAs only, and those on both medications. Multivariable logistic and linear regressions were performed after controlling for prehospitalization characteristics to estimate the effect of RAASIs on mortality and other outcomes during hospitalization. Of 26,652 patients, 7,975 patients were on AHAs prior to hospitalization. Of these, 1,542 patients (19.3%) were on RAASIs only, 3,765 patients (47.2%) were on other AHAs only, and 2,668 (33.5%) patients were on both medications. Compared with those taking other AHAs only, patients on RAASIs only were younger (mean age 63.3 vs 66.9 yr; p < 0.0001), more often male (58.2% vs 52.4%; p = 0.0001) and more often White (55.1% vs 47.2%; p < 0.0001). After adjusting for age, gender, race, location, and comorbidities, patients on combination of RAASIs and other AHAs had higher in-hospital mortality than those on RAASIs only (odds ratio [OR] = 1.28; 95% CI [1.19-1.38]; p < 0.0001) and higher mortality than those on other AHAs only (OR = 1.09; 95% CI [1.03-1.15]; p = 0.0017). Patients on RAASIs only had lower mortality than those on other AHAs only (OR = 0.87; 95% CI [0.81-0.94]; p = 0.0003). Patients on ACEIs only had higher mortality compared with those on ARBs only (OR = 1.37; 95% CI [1.20-1.56]; p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Among patients hospitalized for COVID-19 who were taking AHAs, prior use of a combination of RAASIs and other AHAs was associated with higher in-hospital mortality than the use of RAASIs alone. When compared with ARBs, ACEIs were associated with significantly higher mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000005627DOI Listing
July 2022

Admission Code Status and End-of-life Care for Hospitalized Patients With COVID-19.

J Pain Symptom Manage 2022 Jun 25. Epub 2022 Jun 25.

Cambia Palliative Care Center of Excellence (WA.K., L.R.P., C.J.C., E.K.K., J.R.C., N.K.), University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine (N.K.), University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Context: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted variability in intensity of care. We aimed to characterize intensity of care among hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Objectives: Examine the prevalence and predictors of admission code status, palliative care consultation, comfort-measures-only orders, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

Methods: This cross-sectional study examined data from an international registry of hospitalized patients with COVID-19. A proportional odds model evaluated predictors of more aggressive code status (i.e., Full Code) vs. less (i.e., Do Not Resuscitate, DNR). Among decedents, logistic regression was used to identify predictors of palliative care consultation, comfort measures only, and CPR at time of death.

Results: We included 29,923 patients across 179 sites. Among those with admission code status documented, Full Code was selected by 90% (n = 15,273). Adjusting for site, Full Code was more likely for patients who were of Black or Asian race (ORs 1.82, 95% CIs 1.5-2.19; 1.78, 1.15-3.09 respectively, relative to White race), Hispanic ethnicity (OR 1.89, CI 1.35-2.32), and male sex (OR 1.16, CI 1.0-1.33). Of the 4951 decedents, 29% received palliative care consultation, 59% transitioned to comfort measures only, and 29% received CPR, with non-White racial and ethnic groups less likely to receive comfort measures only and more likely to receive CPR.

Conclusion: In this international cohort of patients with COVID-19, Full Code was the initial code status in the majority, and more likely among patients who were Black or Asian race, Hispanic ethnicity or male. These results provide direction for future studies to improve these disparities in care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2022.06.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9233554PMC
June 2022

Neurologic Manifestations of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Infection in Hospitalized Patients During the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Crit Care Explor 2022 Apr 25;4(4):e0686. Epub 2022 Apr 25.

Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

To describe the prevalence, associated risk factors, and outcomes of serious neurologic manifestations (encephalopathy, stroke, seizure, and meningitis/encephalitis) among patients hospitalized with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection.

Design: Prospective observational study.

Setting: One hundred seventy-nine hospitals in 24 countries within the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study COVID-19 Registry.

Patients: Hospitalized adults with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Interventions: None.

Results: Of 16,225 patients enrolled in the registry with hospital discharge status available, 2,092 (12.9%) developed serious neurologic manifestations including 1,656 (10.2%) with encephalopathy at admission, 331 (2.0%) with stroke, 243 (1.5%) with seizure, and 73 (0.5%) with meningitis/encephalitis at admission or during hospitalization. Patients with serious neurologic manifestations of COVID-19 were older with median (interquartile range) age 72 years (61.0-81.0 yr) versus 61 years (48.0-72.0 yr) and had higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions, including vascular risk factors. Adjusting for age, sex, and time since the onset of the pandemic, serious neurologic manifestations were associated with more severe disease (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; < 0.001) as defined by the World Health Organization ordinal disease severity scale for COVID-19 infection. Patients with neurologic manifestations were more likely to be admitted to the ICU (OR, 1.45; < 0.001) and require critical care interventions (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: OR, 1.78; = 0.009 and renal replacement therapy: OR, 1.99; < 0.001). Hospital, ICU, and 28-day mortality for patients with neurologic manifestations was higher (OR, 1.51, 1.37, and 1.58; < 0.001), and patients had fewer ICU-free, hospital-free, and ventilator-free days (estimated difference in days, -0.84, -1.34, and -0.84; < 0.001).

Conclusions: Encephalopathy at admission is common in hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and is associated with worse outcomes. While serious neurologic manifestations including stroke, seizure, and meningitis/encephalitis were less common, all were associated with increased ICU support utilization, more severe disease, and worse outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCE.0000000000000686DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9042584PMC
April 2022

Association of latitude and altitude with adverse outcomes in patients with COVID-19: The VIRUS registry.

World J Crit Care Med 2022 Mar 9;11(2):102-111. Epub 2022 Mar 9.

Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, United States.

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) course may be affected by environmental factors. Ecological studies previously suggested a link between climatological factors and COVID-19 fatality rates. However, individual-level impact of these factors has not been thoroughly evaluated yet.

Aim: To study the association of climatological factors related to patient location with unfavorable outcomes in patients.

Methods: In this observational analysis of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study: COVID-19 Registry cohort, the latitudes and altitudes of hospitals were examined as a covariate for mortality within 28 d of admission and the length of hospital stay. Adjusting for baseline parameters and admission date, multivariable regression modeling was utilized. Generalized estimating equations were used to fit the models.

Results: Twenty-two thousand one hundred eight patients from over 20 countries were evaluated. The median age was 62 (interquartile range: 49-74) years, and 54% of the included patients were males. The median age increased with increasing latitude as well as the frequency of comorbidities. Contrarily, the percentage of comorbidities was lower in elevated altitudes. Mortality within 28 d of hospital admission was found to be 25%. The median hospital-free days among all included patients was 20 d. Despite the significant linear relationship between mortality and hospital-free days (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.39 (1.04, 1.86), 0.025 for mortality within 28 d of admission; aOR = -1.47 (-2.60, -0.33), 0.011 for hospital-free days), suggesting that adverse patient outcomes were more common in locations further away from the Equator; the results were no longer significant when adjusted for baseline differences (aOR = 1.32 (1.00, 1.74), = 0.051 for 28-day mortality; aOR = -1.07 (-2.13, -0.01), 0.050 for hospital-free days). When we looked at the altitude's effect, we discovered that it demonstrated a non-linear association with mortality within 28 d of hospital admission (aOR = 0.96 (0.62, 1.47), 1.04 (0.92, 1.19), 0.49 (0.22, 0.90), and 0.51 (0.27, 0.98), for the altitude points of 75 MASL, 125 MASL, 400 MASL, and 600 MASL, in comparison to the reference altitude of 148 m.a.s.l, respectively. 0.001). We detected an association between latitude and 28-day mortality as well as hospital-free days in this worldwide study. When the baseline features were taken into account, however, this did not stay significant.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that differences observed in previous epidemiological studies may be due to ecological fallacy rather than implying a causal relationship at the patient level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5492/wjccm.v11.i2.102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8968480PMC
March 2022

Hospital Variation in Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Due to COVID-19.

Crit Care Explor 2022 Feb 18;10(2):e0638. Epub 2022 Feb 18.

The Pulmonary Center, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Sleep and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

Objectives: To describe hospital variation in use of "guideline-based care" for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19.

Design: Retrospective, observational study.

Setting: The Society of Critical Care Medicine's Discovery Viral Infection and

Patients: Adult patients with ARDS due to COVID-19 between February 15, 2020, and April 12, 2021.

Interventions: Hospital-level use of "guideline-based care" for ARDS including low-tidal-volume ventilation, plateau pressure less than 30 cm HO, and prone ventilation for a Pao/Fio ratio less than 100.

Measurements And Main Results: Among 1,495 adults with COVID-19 ARDS receiving care across 42 hospitals, 50.4% ever received care consistent with ARDS clinical practice guidelines. After adjusting for patient demographics and severity of illness, hospital characteristics, and pandemic timing, hospital of admission contributed to 14% of the risk-adjusted variation in "guideline-based care." A patient treated at a randomly selected hospital with higher use of guideline-based care had a median odds ratio of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1-3.4) for receipt of "guideline-based care" compared with a patient receiving treatment at a randomly selected hospital with low use of recommended therapies. Median-adjusted inhospital mortality was 53% (interquartile range, 47-62%), with a nonsignificantly decreased risk of mortality for patients admitted to hospitals in the highest use "guideline-based care" quartile (49%) compared with the lowest use quartile (60%) (odds ratio, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.3-1.9; = 0.49).

Conclusions: During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, only half of patients received "guideline-based care" for ARDS management, with wide practice variation across hospitals. Strategies that improve adherence to recommended ARDS management strategies are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCE.0000000000000638DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8860338PMC
February 2022

Association of hypothyroidism with outcomes in hospitalized adults with COVID-19: Results from the International SCCM Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study (VIRUS): COVID-19 Registry.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2022 Feb 18. Epub 2022 Feb 18.

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Primary hypothyroidism is a common comorbid condition, but little is known about its association with COVID-19 severity and outcomes. This study aims to identify the frequency of hypothyroidism in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 as well as describe the differences in outcomes between patients with and without pre-existing hypothyroidism using an observational, multinational registry.

Methods: In an observational cohort study we enrolled patients 18 years or older, with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 infection between March 2020 and February 2021. The primary outcomes were (1) the disease severity defined as per the World Health Organization Scale for Clinical Improvement, which is an ordinal outcome corresponding with the highest severity level recorded during a patient's index COVID-19 hospitalization, (2) in-hospital mortality and (3) hospital-free days. Secondary outcomes were the rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and ICU mortality.

Results: Among the 20,366 adult patients included in the study, pre-existing hypothyroidism was identified in 1616 (7.9%). The median age for the Hypothyroidism group was 70 (interquartile range: 59-80) years, and 65% were female and 67% were White. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (68%), diabetes (42%), dyslipidemia (37%) and obesity (28%). After adjusting for age, body mass index, sex, admission date in the quarter year since March 2020, race, smoking history and other comorbid conditions (coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia), pre-existing hypothyroidism was not associated with higher odds of severe disease using the World Health Organization disease severity index (odds ratio [OR]: 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92, 1.13; p = .69), in-hospital mortality (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.15; p = .58) or differences in hospital-free days (estimated difference 0.01 days; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.47; p = .97). Pre-existing hypothyroidism was not associated with ICU admission or ICU mortality in unadjusted as well as in adjusted analysis.

Conclusions: In an international registry, hypothyroidism was identified in around 1 of every 12 adult hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Pre-existing hypothyroidism in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 was not associated with higher disease severity or increased risk of mortality or ICU admissions. However, more research on the possible effects of COVID-19 on the thyroid gland and its function is needed in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cen.14699DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9111656PMC
February 2022

SARS-CoV-2 infection increases risk of acute kidney injury in a bimodal age distribution.

BMC Nephrol 2022 02 11;23(1):63. Epub 2022 Feb 11.

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

Background: Hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV2 develop acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently, yet gaps remain in understanding why adults seem to have higher rates compared to children. Our objectives were to evaluate the epidemiology of SARS-CoV2-related AKI across the age spectrum and determine if known risk factors such as illness severity contribute to its pattern.

Methods: Secondary analysis of ongoing prospective international cohort registry. AKI was defined by KDIGO-creatinine only criteria. Log-linear, logistic and generalized estimating equations assessed odds ratios (OR), risk differences (RD), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for AKI and mortality adjusting for sex, pre-existing comorbidities, race/ethnicity, illness severity, and clustering within centers. Sensitivity analyses assessed different baseline creatinine estimators.

Results: Overall, among 6874 hospitalized patients, 39.6% (n = 2719) developed AKI. There was a bimodal distribution of AKI by age with peaks in older age (≥60 years) and middle childhood (5-15 years), which persisted despite controlling for illness severity, pre-existing comorbidities, or different baseline creatinine estimators. For example, the adjusted OR of developing AKI among hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV2 was 2.74 (95% CI 1.66-4.56) for 10-15-year-olds compared to 30-35-year-olds and similarly was 2.31 (95% CI 1.71-3.12) for 70-75-year-olds, while adjusted OR dropped to 1.39 (95% CI 0.97-2.00) for 40-45-year-olds compared to 30-35-year-olds.

Conclusions: SARS-CoV2-related AKI is common with a bimodal age distribution that is not fully explained by known risk factors or confounders. As the pandemic turns to disproportionately impacting younger individuals, this deserves further investigation as the presence of AKI and SARS-CoV2 infection increases hospital mortality risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12882-022-02681-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8831033PMC
February 2022

Palliative care consultation and end-of-life outcomes in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Resuscitation 2022 01 14;170:230-237. Epub 2021 Dec 14.

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.

Rationale: The impact of palliative care consultation on end-of-life care has not previously been evaluated in a multi-center study.

Objectives: To evaluate the impact of palliative care consultation on the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed and comfort care received at the end-of-life in hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Methods: We used the Society of Critical Care Medicine's COVID-19 registry to extract clinical data on patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between March 31st, 2020 to March 17th, 2021 and died during their hospitalization. The proportion of patients who received palliative care consultation was assessed in patients who did and did not receive CPR (primary outcome) and comfort care (secondary outcome). Propensity matching was used to account for potential confounding variables.

Measurements And Main Results: 3,227 patients were included in the analysis. There was no significant difference in the incidence of palliative care consultation between the CPR and no-CPR groups (19.9% vs. 19.4%, p = 0.8334). Patients who received comfort care at the end-of-life were significantly more likely to have received palliative care consultation (43.3% vs. 7.7%, p < 0.0001). After propensity matching for comfort care on demographic characteristics and comorbidities, this relationship was still significant (43.2% vs. 8.5%; p < 0.0001).

Conclusion: Palliative care consultation was not associated with CPR performed at the end-of-life but was associated with increased incidence of comfort care being utilized. These results suggest that utilizing palliative care consultation at the end-of-life may better align the needs and values of patients with the care they receive.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.12.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8669976PMC
January 2022

Variation in Use of Repurposed Medications Among Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019. From The Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study: Coronavirus Disease 2019 Registry Investigator Group.

Crit Care Explor 2021 Nov 2;3(11):e0566. Epub 2021 Nov 2.

The Pulmonary Center, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Sleep and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

Importance: At the start of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, medications repurposed for management of coronavirus disease 2019 were used in the absence of clinical trial evidence.

Objectives: To describe the variation and evolution in use of repurposed medications for coronavirus disease 2019.

Design Setting And Participants: Observational cohort study of adults hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 between February 15, 2020, and April 12, 2021, across 76 United States and international hospitals within the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Discovery Viral Infection and Respiratory Illness Universal Study coronavirus disease 2019 registry.

Main Outcomes And Measures: Hospital variation was quantified using multivariable adjusted random effects logistic regression models and unsupervised clustering. Repurposed medications included antivirals, corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, immunomodulators, and therapeutic dose anticoagulants.

Results: Among 7,069 adults hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019, 1,979 (28%) received antivirals, 2,876 (41%) received corticosteroids, 1,779 (25%) received hydroxychloroquine, 620 (9%) received immunomodulators, and 2,154 (31%) received therapeutic dose anticoagulants. Contribution of hospital site to risk-adjusted variation was 46% for antivirals, 30% for corticosteroids, 48% for hydroxychloroquine, 46% for immunomodulators, and 52% for therapeutic dose anticoagulants. Compared with the early pandemic, the later pandemic practice phenotypes converged with increased use of antivirals (odds ratio, 3.14; 95% CI, 2.40-4.10) and corticosteroids (odds ratio, 5.43; 95% CI, 4.23-6.97), with decreased use of hydroxychloroquine (odds ratio, 0.02; 95% CI, 0.01-0.04) and immunomodulators (odds ratio, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.34-0.70). There was no clinically significant change in the use of therapeutic dose anticoagulants (odds ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02). There were no differences in risk-adjusted mortality between hospitals with high rates of repurposed medication use compared with hospitals with low rates of use.

Conclusions And Relevance: Hospital variation in the use of repurposed medications varied widely across hospitals early in the pandemic and later converged with the emergence of randomized clinical trials. Platforms developed for rapid activation and enrollment in clinical trials of repurposed medications are needed prior to the next pandemic to expedite effective, evidence-based practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCE.0000000000000566DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8565794PMC
November 2021

Strategies for General Surgery Training Programs During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Am Surg 2020 Nov 1;86(11):1501-1507. Epub 2020 Nov 1.

12241Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA.

The COVID-19 pandemic presented a unique challenge for Medical systems worldwide. Initial response to the crisis situation for the pandemic closely mirrored plans for a mass casualty event. By leveraging resources including human and physical, and by dividing our surgeon workforce into micro teams we were able to create a flexible and responsive infrastructure to address the crisis as it unfolded. By adoption of virtual platforms and equal division of labor, surgical resident education was continued. Specific adjustments to the schedule and curriculum for medical students allowed them to continue their studies safely and on schedule. Our model serves as an example by which hospital systems of similar size may utilize principles of mass casualty preparedness to craft their own plan for a future contagion response strategy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003134820966271DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7669277PMC
November 2020

Early outcomes with utilization of tissue plasminogen activator in COVID-19-associated respiratory distress: A series of five cases.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2020 09;89(3):448-452

From the Department of Trauma/Critical Care The Medical Center Navicent Health, Mercer University School of Medicine (D.B.C., H.M.N., A.M.S., C.M.F., C.W.C., A.B.C., D.W.A., J.T.B., A.A., M.S.K., E.A.J.), Macon, Georgia.

Background: Coronavirus patients demonstrate varying degrees of respiratory insufficiency; many will progress to respiratory failure with a severe version of acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to traditional supportive strategies. Providers must consider alternative therapies to deter or prevent the cascade of decompensation to fulminant respiratory failure.

Methods: This is a case-series of five COVID-19 positive patients who demonstrated severe hypoxemia, declining respiratory performance, and escalating oxygen requirements. Patients met the following criteria: COVID-19 positivity, worsening respiratory performance, severe hypoxemia (PaO2 ≤ 80) despite traditional supportive measures, escalating supplemental oxygen requirements, and D-dimer greater than 1.5 μg/mL. All patients received protocol directed thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA).

Results: All five patients improved without deleterious effects of thrombolytic therapy. Patient one was on maximum ventilator support, paralytics, and prone positioning without improvement. During tPA administration his PaO2/FIO2 ratio improved from 69 to 127. Ventilator support was weaned immediately on posttreatment day 1, and he was extubated on posttreatment day 12. Our second through fifth patients were not intubated at time of initiation of tPA therapy. These patients each required significant oxygen supplementation trending toward intubation. After tPA therapy, all patients demonstrated a noticeable increase in PaO2 values overtime. Three of these patients avoided intubation due to COVID-19-associated respiratory failure.

Conclusion: Administration of thrombolytics was followed by overall improvement in patients' oxygen requirements, and in three cases, prevented progression to mechanical ventilation, without deleterious effects. Clinical trials of thrombolytic therapy would further serve to underscore the efficacy and utility of this therapy.

Level Of Evidence: Case series of therapeutic effect, Level V.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000002787DOI Listing
September 2020

Geriatric Trauma Screening Tool: Preinjury Functional Status Dictates Intensive Care Unit Discharge Disposition.

Am Surg 2019 Aug;85(8):800-805

Older adults account for an increasing percentage of trauma patients and have worse outcomes when compared with younger populations. Simple prediction tools are needed to designate risk categories among these patients. The Geriatric Trauma Screening Tool (GTST) was developed to risk stratify older adults admitted to the ICU at a Level 1 trauma center. One hundred fifty patients aged ≥ 65 years were prospectively screened for high-risk (HR) injuries, comorbidities, and prehospital function using the GTST. Patients who screened for HR were more likely to have an unfavorable disposition than non-HR patients. HR patients had significantly longer ICU and hospital length of stays when compared with non-HR patients. In addition, patients with prior functional impairment were at higher risk for an unfavorable discharge disposition than their counterparts. Implementation of the GTST predicted discharge disposition in geriatric trauma patients admitted to the ICU. Pre-injury functional status was a better predictor of discharge disposition than either the types of HR injuries or the presence of comorbidities. Risk stratification of geriatric trauma patients allows for early engagement of patients and caregivers regarding transitions of care as well as more efficient utilization of hospital resources.
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August 2019

Hepatic artery aneurysms: evolution from open to endovascular repair techniques.

Am Surg 2011 May;77(5):608-11

Department of Surgery, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia 31201, USA.

With the development of endovascular therapy, treatment for hepatic artery aneurysm (HAA) has evolved from open excision and repair to include endovascular approaches. We reviewed our recent experience with HAA to help define the treatment of HAA. From 2002 to 2010, five patients underwent treatment of HAA, all men with a median age of 63.2 years (range, 41-75). The median diameter of HAA was 5.8 cm (range, 2.4 cm-11 cm). Four lesions involved the extrahepatic portion of the hepatic artery, and one was an intrahepatic HAA that involved the right hepatic artery. Three were true aneurysms and two were pseudoaneurysms associated with trauma. Four of the five HAA patients were symptomatic, three with nonspecific abdominal pain, and one with free hemorrhage from a ruptured intrahepatic pseudoaneurysm. All five underwent computed tomography and selective arteriography. Two patients underwent open surgical aneurysmectomy and revascularization because of aneurysm location and concerns of the potential lack of collateral flow. Three patients underwent an endovascular coil embolization because obliteration of a saccular aneurysm could be achieved without compromising arterial flow of the native hepatic vessel. Re-embolization was necessary in the intrahepatic aneurysm because of recanalization of a feeding vessel. Endovascular embolization is an important minimally invasive approach in the treatment of HAA. Depending on HAA location and the adequacy of collateral arterial flow around the lesion, open aneurysmectomy and revascularization may be required.
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May 2011
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