Publications by authors named "Amrendra S Miranpuri"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Endovascular management of cerebral septic embolism: three recent cases and review of the literature.

J Neurointerv Surg 2017 May 29;9(5):463-465. Epub 2016 Nov 29.

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.

Endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke secondary to septic emboli from bacterial endocarditis is case-specific and outside established guidelines. We report three new cases of an acute ischemic stroke secondary to septic embolus from two different centers. All cases reported here were large vessel occlusions of the middle cerebral artery in anticoagulated patients. In one case the embolus was noted to be firm and aspiration thrombectomy was attempted in lieu of stent retrieval. Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia (TICI) 3 recanalization was achieved and the patient experienced a good outcome with resolution of deficits. In this case, pathologic analysis of the embolus was available. These additional three cases from two centers add to the small but growing literature for interventional management of acute ischemic stroke in bacterial endocarditis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2016-012792DOI Listing
May 2017

Anticoagulation Reversal Strategies for Left Ventricular Assist Device Patients Presenting with Acute Intracranial Hemorrhage.

ASAIO J 2016 Sep-Oct;62(5):552-7

From the *Division of Cardiac Surgery, †Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology, and ‡Department of Neurosurgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.

The safety of alternative vitamin K antagonist (VKA) reversal strategies in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD's) who present with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) are not well known. A review of LVAD patients with ICH from May 2008 to 2015 was conducted, comparing the safety and efficacy of 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate-assisted VKA reversal (4F-PCC group, n = 10) to reversal with traditional agents alone (no-PCC group, n = 10). An analysis of a no-reversal strategy in selected patients (n = 11) with ICH was additionally performed. Thirty-one cases of ICH on LVAD support were reviewed. The rate of post reversal thromboembolic events was not significantly different between 4F-PCC and no-PCC patients (0% vs. 10%, p = 1.0); however, the time to VKA reversal was shorter (474 vs. 945 minutes, p = 0.02) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) requirements lower (1.9 vs. 3.6 units, p = 0.05) in 4F-PCC patients, with no difference in mortality between groups (p = 1.0). Eleven patients (mean ICH volume: 0.4 cm) were successfully managed without active VKA reversal, with no increased hemorrhage noted on neuroimaging. These results suggest that 4F-PCC-assisted reversal in LVAD patients is safe and may improve the efficacy of VKA reversal. Our findings also indicate that carefully selected patients with small ICH volumes may be safely managed by discontinuing anticoagulation and allowing the international normalized ratio (INR) to normalize physiologically.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAT.0000000000000404DOI Listing
November 2017

Neurosurgery clinical registry data collection utilizing Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside and electronic health records at the University of Rochester.

Neurosurg Focus 2015 Dec;39(6):E16

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Rochester, New York.

In a population health-driven health care system, data collection through the use of clinical registries is becoming imperative to continue to drive effective and efficient patient care. Clinical registries rely on a department's ability to collect high-quality and accurate data. Currently, however, data are collected manually with a high risk for error. The University of Rochester's Department of Neurosurgery in conjunction with the university's Clinical and Translational Science Institute has implemented the integrated use of the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) informatics framework with the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) databases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2015.9.FOCUS15382DOI Listing
December 2015

Neuroangiography simulation using a silicone model in the angiography suite improves trainee skills.

J Neurointerv Surg 2014 Sep 23;6(7):561-4. Epub 2013 Sep 23.

Department of Neurologic Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Purpose: Simulation techniques in neurosurgical training are becoming more important. The purpose of this study was to determine whether silicone vascular models used in the angiography suite can render improvement in trainee performance and safety in neuroendovascular procedures.

Methods: 10 residents from neurosurgery and radiology training programs were asked to perform a diagnostic angiogram on a silicone based vascular model (United Biologics, Tustin, USA). This was done in the angiography suite with the full biplane fluoroscopy machine (Siemens, Munich, Germany). On their first attempt, they were coached by a faculty member trained in endovascular neurosurgery; on their second attempt, they received coaching only if the procedure had stalled. Technique was scored on multiple criteria by the faculty, and total time and fluoroscopy time were recorded on both attempts.

Results: In this group of 10 residents, overall procedure time significantly decreased from 51 to 42 min (p=0.01), and total fluoro time significantly decreased from 12 to 9 min (p=0.002) between the first attempt and the second attempt. Technical skill increased significantly in navigation, vessel selection, projection setup, and road map usage.

Conclusions: Silicone vascular models used in the angiography suite, with the clinical working tools and biplane fluoroscopy, provide a valuable experience for training residents in diagnostic angiography, and improved performance and safety.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2013-010826DOI Listing
September 2014

Balloon augmented Onyx embolization utilizing a dual lumen balloon catheter: utility in the treatment of a variety of head and neck lesions.

J Neurointerv Surg 2014 Sep 11;6(7):547-55. Epub 2013 Sep 11.

Department of Radiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.

Introduction: Endovascular embolization for tumors and vascular malformations has emerged as an important preoperative adjunct prior to resection. We describe the advantages of utilizing a recently released dual lumen balloon catheter for ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, also known as Onyx (ev3, Irvine, California, USA), embolization for a variety of head and neck pathologies.

Methods: A retrospective review of all cases utilizing the Scepter C balloon catheter (MicroVention Inc, Tustin, California, USA) for use in balloon augmented embolization was performed over a 4 month period from October 2012 to February 2013 at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. Charts and angiographic images were reviewed. Representative cases involving diverse pathologies are summarized and illustrate the observed advantages of balloon augmented Onyx embolization with a dual lumen balloon catheter.

Case Illustrations: Balloon augmented Onyx embolization utilizing a novel dual lumen balloon catheter was employed to treat both ruptured and unruptured arteriovenous malformations, intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae, intracranial neoplasms, carotid body tumors, a thyroid mass, and an extracranial arteriovenous fistula.

Conclusions: The dual lumen balloon catheter has several advantages for use with Onyx embolization over older devices, including more efficient proximal plug formation and enhanced navigability for placement deep within the pedicles. The balloon augmented Onyx embolization technique represents a valuable tool to add to the armamentarium of the neurointerventionalist to address a variety of head and neck lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2013-010833DOI Listing
September 2014

Demographic, circadian, and climatic factors in non-aneurysmal versus aneursymal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2013 Mar 6;115(3):298-303. Epub 2012 Jul 6.

Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Background: Although, the relationship of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to climatic or circadian factors has been widely studied, epidemiologic, circardian and climatic factors in non-aneurysmal SAH (naSAH), particularly perimesencephalic SAH (PMH), has not been reported before.

Objective: For the first time, demographic, climatic, and circadian variables are examined together as possible contributing factors comparing aSAH and naSAH.

Methods: We reviewed records for 384 patients admitted to University of Wisconsin Neurosurgery Service from January 2005 to December 2010 with spontaneous non-traumatic SAH. Patients were grouped as aSAH (n=338) or naSAH (n=46) on clinical and radiological criteria. PMH (n=32) was identified as a subgroup of naSAH based on radiological criteria. We logged demographic data, time of SAH, temperature at onset and atmospheric pressure at onset. The three subgroups were compared.

Results: Aneurysmal SAH occurred most often from 6am to 12pm (p<0.001); this correlation was not found in naSAH or PMH subgroups. Demographic analysis demonstrated predominance of female gender (p=0.008) and smoking (p=0.002) in aSAH, with predominance of hypercholesterolemia in naSAH (p=0.033). Atmospheric pressure, correlated with aSAH in the main county referral area, where we had detailed weather data (p<0.05); however, there was no weather correlation in the entire referral region taken together. Multivariate analysis supported a statistical difference only in smoking status between aSAH and naSAH groups (p=0.0159).

Conclusion: Statistical differences in gender, smoking status, and history of hypercholesterolemia support a clinical distinction between aSAH and naSAH. Furthermore, circadian patterning of aSAH is not reproduced in naSAH, supporting pathophysiologic differences. Only smoking status provides a robust difference in aSAH and naSAH groups. Our data prompt further investigation into the relationship between aSAH and atmospheric pressure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2012.05.039DOI Listing
March 2013

Upper cervical intramedullary spinal metastasis of ovarian carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature.

J Med Case Rep 2011 Jul 14;5:311. Epub 2011 Jul 14.

Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.

Introduction: Currently there is no generalized approach to treating patients with intra-medullary spinal metastasis. High cervical spinal cord lesions can be particularly challenging cases, and may even be considered inoperable by some.

Case Report: We present what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of ovarian carcinoma (managed primarily with surgery) in a 65-year-old Caucasian woman metastasizing to the upper cervical spinal cord; we also review the relevant literature and discuss management strategies.

Conclusions: Due to improving systemic cancer therapies, patients with cancer now often survive longer and are more likely to develop central nervous system metastases. Therefore, neurosurgical oncologists are often challenged with difficult decisions about how to surgically manage these patients. We recommend individualized multidisciplinary management based on patient functional status, the need for definitive diagnosis for possible additional adjuvant therapies, and consideration of extent of systemic disease impacting on desirable quality and length of survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1752-1947-5-311DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3154862PMC
July 2011
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