Publications by authors named "Amreen Bashir"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Combined Effect of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Survival of Isolates on Stainless Steel Coupons.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 01 14;19(2). Epub 2022 Jan 14.

College of Health & Life Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK.

The survival on stainless steel of ten isolates from food factory, clinical and veterinary sources was investigated. Stainless steel coupons inoculated with were dried and stored at a range of temperatures and relative humidity (RH) levels representing factory conditions. Viability was determined from 1 to 22 days. Survival curves obtained for most isolates and storage conditions displayed exponential inactivation described by a log-linear model. Survival was affected by environmental temperatures and RH with decimal reduction times (DRTs) ranging from <1 day to 18 days. At 25 °C/15% RH, all isolates survived at levels of 10 to 10 cfu for >22 days. Furthermore, temperatures and RH independently influenced survival on stainless steel; increasing temperatures between 10 °C and 37 °C and increasing RH levels from 30-70% both decreased the DRT values. Survival curves displaying a shoulder followed by exponential death were obtained for three isolates at 10 °C/70% RH. Inactivation kinetics for these were described by modified Weibull models, suggesting that cumulative injury occurs before cellular inactivation. This study highlights the need to control temperature and RH to limit microbial persistence in the food manufacturing environment, particularly during the factory shut-down period for cleaning when higher temperature/humidity levels could be introduced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8776188PMC
January 2022

A Virtual Approach to Promote Inter-Professional Learning (IPL) Between Biomedical Science and Medicine in Higher Education for the Benefit of Patient Care.

Front Public Health 2021 6;9:747751. Epub 2021 Oct 6.

School of Biosciences, College of Health and Life Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

In the clinical setting, collaboration between multidisciplinary teams is core to providing effective patient care. The delivery of traditional interprofessional education is associated with a number of logistical challenges, which were heightened by the Covid-19 pandemic. This workshop was developed to bring together Biomedical Science and Medical students using an online platform. The workshop consisted of (1) defining interprofessional education, (2) introducing the role of the Pathology laboratory, (3) Professional registration with regulatory bodies and (4) an insight into Covid-19 laboratory diagnosis. The session was supported by mixed group breakout rooms and interactive polling. Thirty four percent of students completed a post-workshop online survey which included open and closed questions. Thematic analysis revealed a better understanding the role of the pathology laboratory in diagnosing disease, an increased awareness of the similarities and differences in the roles of a Biomedical Scientist and a Medic and the importance of a multi-disciplinary team in achieving effective patient care. Quantitative analysis of survey data revealed that the majority of students reported positive experiences of interprofessional education online. Approximately 90% of students agreed that the workshop enabled them to increase their understanding of their own roles within healthcare, in addition to increasing their understanding of the roles of other healthcare professionals. 74.3% of participants reported that working with students from a different programme provided an alternative perspective. Seventy nine percent of students agreed that the online format enabled interactivity and discussion of the tasks. Of the 204 students, 85% engaged with the four polls during the workshop. This online workshop enabled discussion between degree programmes, enabled interactivity and allowed the learning outcomes to be met. Universities should embrace online platforms to provide a novel, engaging and effective interprofessional educational experience.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2021.747751DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8526844PMC
October 2021

Aston University's Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Roadshow: raising awareness and embedding knowledge of AMR in key stage 4 learners.

Infect Prev Pract 2020 Jun 28;2(2):100060. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET, UK.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global healthcare problem and therefore raising awareness within young learners is imperative. An AMR roadshow was designed to take key stage 4 students' learning 'out of the classroom', assess pre-existing knowledge of AMR and determine the impact of the roadshow on knowledge retention. Knowledge and subsequent retention were measured pre- and post-event through a standardised questionnaire. The roadshow significantly improved knowledge and understanding of AMR, which was retained for a minimum of twelve weeks. Engaging and interactive strategies addressing key health issues provide a positive learning experience which contributes to retained knowledge in young learners.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.infpip.2020.100060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8336141PMC
June 2020

Pet Food Factory Isolates of Serotypes Do Not Demonstrate Enhanced Biofilm Formation Compared to Serotype-Matched Clinical and Veterinary Isolates.

Biomed Res Int 2019 29;2019:8569459. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

School of Life & Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET, UK.

Environmentally persistent in the pet food factory environment has been described, with biofilm formation suggested as a candidate mechanism contributing to their persistence. In this study the ability of a panel of isolates from factory, clinical, and veterinary sources was investigated for their ability to form biofilms at 24 and 48 hours. The effect of nutrient availability and incubation time on biofilm formation was investigated using full strength and diluted 1/20 TSB media at 37°C, 25°C, 15°C, and 10°C. Results highlighted that all the isolates were able to form biofilms in both nutrient conditions and this was highly correlated with temperature. At 25°C, biofilm formation was enhanced in diluted 1/20 TSB and increased incubation time (48h) (p= <0.001). However, this was not observed at 10°C, 15°C, or 37°C. None of the factory isolates demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation in comparison to serotype-matched isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Senftenberg 775W was the strongest biofilm former at 15°C, 25°C, and 37°C in all the conditions tested (p=<0.05). Biofilm formation is an important mechanism of environmental persistence in the food manufacturing environment; however, there is no evidence of an enhanced biofilm-producing phenotype in factory persistent strains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/8569459DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6374821PMC
June 2019
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