Publications by authors named "Amos Dangana"

10 Publications

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Dengue Virus is Hyperendemic in Nigeria from 2009 to 2020: A Contemporary Systematic Review.

Infect Chemother 2021 Jun;53(2):284-299

Department of Nursing Science, Maryam Abacha American university of Niger, Maradi, Niger Republic.

Backround: Data on Dengue virus (DENV) infection prevalence, geographic distribution and risk factors are necessary to direct appropriate utilization of existing and emerging control strategies. This study aimed to determine the pooled prevalence, risk factors of DENV infection and the circulating serotypes within Nigeria from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2020.

Materials And Methods: Twenty-one studies out of 2,215 available articles were eligible and included for this systematic review. Relevant articles were searched, screened and included in this study according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria. The risk of bias in primary studies was assessed by Cochrane's method. Heterogeneity of pooled prevalence was calculated using the chi-square test on Cochrane's Q statistic, which was quantified by I-square values. The random-effects analyses of proportions were used to determine the pooled prevalence of DENV antibodies, antigen and RNA from eligible studies.

Results: Of these, 3 studies reported co-circulation of all the 4 serotypes, while 2 separately reported co-circulation of DENV-1 &2 and DENV-1 to -3. All the antibody-based studies had significantly high heterogeneity (I² >90%, <0.05), while the NS1 and PCR-based studies had low heterogeneity (I² <25%, >0.05). The pooled prevalence of DENV IgM, IgG, RNA, NS1 and neutralizing antibodies were 16.8%, 34.7%, 7.7%, 7.7% and 0.7%, respectively. South-east Nigeria had the highest pooled DENV-IgG seropositivity, 77.1%. Marital status, gender, educational level and occupation status, the proximity of residence to refuse dumpsite, frequent use of trousers and long sleeve shirts were significantly associated with DENV IgG seropositivity ( <0.05).

Conclusion: Based on these findings, it can be inferred that Nigeria is hyperendemic for Dengue fever and needs concerted efforts to control its spread within and outside the country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3947/ic.2020.0142DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8258289PMC
June 2021

The pattern of human papillomavirus infection and genotypes among Nigerian women from 1999 to 2019: a systematic review.

Ann Med 2021 12;53(1):944-959

WHO National Polio Reference Laboratory, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Nigeria.

Background: There are no robust national prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in Nigerian women despite the high burden of cervical cancer morbidity and mortality.

The Objective Of Study: This study aims to determine the pooled prevalence and risk factors of genital HPV infection in Nigeria through a systemic review protocol.

Methods: Databases including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar and AJOL were searched between 10 April to 28 July 2020. HPV studies on Nigerian females and published from April 1999 to March 2019 were included. GRADE was used to assess the quality of evidence.

Results: The pooled prevalence of cervical HPV was 20.65% (95%CI: 19.7-21.7). Genotypes 31 (70.8%), 35 (69.9%) and 16 (52.9%) were the most predominant HPV in circulation. Of the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria, northeast had the highest pooled prevalence of HPV infection (48.1%), while the least was in the north-west (6.8%). After multivariate logistic regression, duration (years) of sexual exposure (OR = 3.24, 95%CI: 1.78-9.23]), history of other malignancies (OR = 1.93, 95%CI: 1.03-2.97]), history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.31-3.55]), coital frequency per week (OR = 5.11, 95%CI: 3.86-14.29), the status of circumcision of the sexual partner (OR = 2.71, 95%CI: 1.62-9.05), and marital status (OR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.16-4.72), were significant risk factors of HPV infection ( < 0.05). Irregular menstruation, post-coital bleeding and abdominal vaginal discharge were significantly associated with HPV infection ( < 0.05).

Conclusion: HPV prevalence is high in Nigeria and was significantly associated with several associated risk factors. Rapid screening for high-risk HPV genotypes is recommended and multivalent HPV vaccines should be considered for women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07853890.2021.1938201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8205070PMC
December 2021

Sero-epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses-1 and -2 infection among pregnant women attending Abuja Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

Hum Antibodies 2021 ;29(1):101-108

WHO National Polio Laboratory, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Nigeria.

Background: There is the paucity of HTLV-1/-2 studies on Nigerian pregnant women despite the medical and public health significance of maternal-to-child transmission of HTLV-1/-2.

Objective: This study aims to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors of HTLV-1/-2 infections among pregnant women attending the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital (UATH), Abuja, Nigeria.

Materials And Methods: Blood samples were collected from consented pregnant women and analysed for ant-HTLV-1/-2 total antibodies using a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit. Pretested structured questionnaires were used to collate participants' socio-demographic variables and risk factors of HTLV infection.

Results: Out of the 156 pregnant women tested for HTLV-1/-2 antibodies, 16 (10.3%) were seropositive. There was no significant association between the socio-demographic variables collated and seroprevalence of HTLV-1/-2 infection among pregnant women (p> 0.05). Pregnant women with HIV infection had a lower prevalence of HLTV-1/-2 infection than those without HIV infections (7.5% versus 11.7%). Pregnant women with multiple sexual partners had a higher risk of HTLV-1/-2 infection than those who had single (OR = 2.08, 95% CI: 0.53-8.18). Women with a history of needles injury had a higher risk of HTLV-1/-2 infection than those who do not (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.38-4.08). The history of blood transfusion was significantly associated with HTLV-1/-2 infection (p= 0.027). However, no significant association existed between other risk factors of HTLV-1/-2 infection among pregnant women (p> 0.05).

Conclusion: Considering the 3% pooled national prevalence of HTLV-1/-2 infection in Nigeria, the seroprevalence reported in this study is relatively high. Thus, there is a need for more large cohort studies and routine screening of population at increased risk of infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/HAB-200435DOI Listing
September 2021

Understanding the implications of SARS-CoV-2 re-infections on immune response milieu, laboratory tests and control measures against COVID-19.

Heliyon 2021 Jan 9;7(1):e05951. Epub 2021 Jan 9.

Department of Nursing Sciences, Maryam Abacha American University of Niger, Maradi, Nigeria.

Several months after the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), cases of re-infection after recovery were reported. The extent and duration of protective immunity after SARS-CoV-2 infection is not fully understood. As such, the possibility of re-infection with SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, cases of re-infection were mainly due to different variants or mutant SARS-CoV-2. Following the fast and pandemic-scale spread of COVID-19, mutations in SARS-CoV-2 have raised new diagnostic challenges which include the redesign of the oligonucleotide sequences used in RT-PCR assays to avoid potential primer-sample mismatches, and decrease sensitivities. Since the initial wave of the pandemic, some regions had experienced fresh outbreaks, predisposing people to be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 re-infection. Hence, this article sought to offer detailed biology of SARS-CoV-2 re-infections and their implications on immune response milieu, diagnostic laboratory tests and control measures against COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2021.e05951DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7810769PMC
January 2021

Leveraging on the genomics and immunopathology of SARS-CoV-2 for vaccines development: prospects and challenges.

Hum Vaccin Immunother 2021 03 16;17(3):620-637. Epub 2020 Sep 16.

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

The incidence and case-fatality rates (CFRs) of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, the etiological agent for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), have been rising unabated. Even though the entire world has been implementing infection prevention and control measures, the pandemic continues to spread. It has been widely accepted that preventive vaccination strategies are the public health measures for countering this pandemic. This study critically reviews the latest scientific advancement in genomics, replication pattern, pathogenesis, and immunopathology of SARS-CoV-2 infection and how these concepts could be used in the development of vaccines. We also offer a detailed discussion on the anticipated potency, efficacy, safety, and pharmaco-economic issues that are and will be associated with candidate COVID-19 vaccines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21645515.2020.1812313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7993231PMC
March 2021

Roles and challenges of coordinated public health laboratory response against COVID-19 pandemic in Africa.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2020 07 31;14(7):691-695. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Department of Medical Laboratory Services, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja Nigeria.

As the incidence of Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) continues to rise, many countries have been seeking for medical assistance such as donation or procurement of laboratory test kits and strips. These consumables are largely intended for use in the laboratory investigations of COVID-19 cases, suspected contacts, asymptomatic persons and in discharging cured persons. Thus, this article was instigated to update and remind healthcare providers and policymakers (especially those in developing countries) on the principles of sample collections, storage, transportation, laboratory protocols and networks needed for appropriate public health response against COVID-19 pandemic in Africa and other developing countries. In addition, this article presents challenges that hinder adequate COVID-19 laboratory response and discuss some possible solutions that could ameliorate these constrains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3855/jidc.12813DOI Listing
July 2020

Phenotypic profile of pulmonary aspergillosis and associated cellular immunity among people living with human immunodeficiency virus in Maiduguri, Nigeria.

Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi 2019 Jul-Sep;31(3):149-153

Department of Medical Laboratory Services, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria.

Objective: causes many forms of pulmonary infectious diseases ranging from colonization (noninvasive) to invasive aspergillosis. This largely depends on the underlying host's lung health and immune status. Pulmonary aspergillosis (PA), especially the invasive form, occurs as opportunistic to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a result of cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ lymphopenia. The majority of patients with comorbid HIV and aspergillosis go undiagnosed. This study aimed to isolate, identify the etiologies, and determine the prevalence of PA among HIV-infected persons with a productive cough (at least <2 weeks) at the HIV Clinics of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

Materials And Methods: After ethical approval, three consecutive early morning sputum samples were collected from patients with negative tuberculosis results. The samples were individually inoculated onto Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with chloramphenicol and cycloheximide in duplicate for 7 days at 37°C and 25°C, respectively. The fungal isolates were examined morphologically and microscopically and identified using the standard biochemical reagents. CD4+ cell counts were performed using flow cytometry. Self-administered questionnaires were used to assess the patients data. All patients were antiretroviral naïve.

Results: The prevalence of PA was 12.7% in these 150 patients. Of the 19 fungal culture-positive individuals, accounted for the highest proportion of the isolates (8, 42.1%) followed by (5, 26.3%), (4, 21.1%), and (2, 10.5%). Based on the assessment of functionality of cellular immunity, HIV participants who were negative for PA (131/150) had significantly higher mean ± standard deviation CD4 T-cell counts (245.65 ± 178.32 cells/mL) than those with aspergillosis (126.13 ± 105.27 cells/mL) ( = 0.0051). PA was relatively highest among patients with CD4+ cell counts <200 cells/mL (12. 34.3%) followed by those with CD4+ cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mL (5, 9.6%) and least among those with CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/mL (2, 3.2%). The Chi-square test showed a significant association between the prevalence of PA and the CD4+ cell count, age, and gender ( < 0.05) but not with occupation or education level ( > 0.05).

Conclusion: The findings from this study indicate that spp. is a significant etiology of acute productive cough in people living with HIV and this is related to the CD4+ cell count of coinfected persons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/tcmj.tcmj_46_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6559025PMC
July 2019

Some haematological parameters, copper and selenium level among children of African descent with sickle cell disease in Specialist Hospital Sokoto, Nigeria.

Hum Antibodies 2019 ;27(3):143-154

Department of Haematology, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria.

Background: Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder of haemoglobin causing myriad of pathology including anaemia.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate some haematological parameters and trace elements of total of forty-five (45) children with Sickle cell disease attending Specialist Hospital Sokoto.

Method: Twenty-five (25) apparently healthy children which were assessed as controls. The haematological parameters were determined using automated method and trace elements (copper and selenium) were determined using colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometry method respectively.

Results: The Mean WBC and PLT was significantly higher among sickle cell disease subjects when compared to controls individuals (p< 0.05). The Mean RBC, HCT, HGB, MCV, MCH and MCHC was significantly lower among Sickle cell disease patients when compared to controls (p< 0.05). The Mean Copper and Selenium value was significantly lower (40.4 ± 1.44 μg/dl and 54.6 ± 1.60 ng/ml) among Sickle cell disease subjects compared to controls (75.6 ± 1.30 μg/dl and 86.3 ± 2.30 ng/ml) (p< 0.05). The WBC, HGB, HGT and Copper values of Sickle cell disease subjects shows a weak positive put non-statistically significant correlation with age (p> 0.05). The RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC, PLT, and Selenium values of sickle cell disease patients shows a negative non-statistically significant correlation indicating that the selenium level decreases as the age increases (p< 0.05).

Conclusion: This study shows that the WBC and platelet count was significantly higher among sickle cell disease subjects compared to controls. The RBC, HCT, HGB, MCV, MCH and MCHC were significantly lower among sickle cell disease patients compared to controls. The serum copper and selenium levels were significantly lower among sickle cell subjects compared to controls. We recommend that trace elements (copper and selenium) and haematological parameters be monitored routinely among sickle cell disease children to optimize the care offered to these individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/HAB-180360DOI Listing
February 2020

Human parvovirus B19-associated hematopathy in HIV disease: need for clinicopathological revisit.

J Biomed Res 2018 01;32(1):1-2

Department of Medical Laboratory Services, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, FCT Abuja 234, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7555/JBR.32.2017010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5956252PMC
January 2018

Dengue virus non-structural Protein-1 expression and associated risk factors among febrile Patients attending University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

Virus Res 2017 02 24;230:7-12. Epub 2016 Dec 24.

Department of Family Medicine, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, FCT Abuja, Nigeria.

Background: Dengue is a mosquito-borne and neglected tropical viral disease that has been reported to be hyper-endemic in Nigeria. However, this is the first dengue study in Abuja.

Objective: This hospital-based cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence of Dengue virus (DENV) non-structural protein-1 (NS1) antigenaemia, anti-Dengue virus IgG and their associated risk factors among febrile patients attending the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital (UATH), Nigeria.

Materials And Methods: From May to August 2016, blood samples were individually collected from 171 consented participants. These samples were analyzed using DENV NS1 and anti-DENV IgG Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kits. Well-structured questionnaires was used to collect sociodemographic variables of participants.

Results: Out of the 171 participants, the prevalence of Dengue virus NS1 antigenaemia and IgG seropositivity were 8.8% and 43.3%, respectively. Three (1.8%) of the patients were NS1 (+) IgG (-), 12 (7.0%) had NS1 (+) IgG (+), 62 (36.3%) were NS1 (-) IgG (+), while 97 (56.7%) of the remaining patients were NS1 (-) IgG (-). There was statistical association between DENV NS1 antigenaemia with age of patients (p=0.034), residence in proximity to waste dumpsites (p<0.0001) but not with occupation of patients (p=0.166), use of indoor insecticide sprays (p=0.4910) and presence of household artificial water containers (p=0.3650). There was statistical association between the prevalence of anti-Dengue virus IgG with occupation (p=0.0034) and education level of patients (p<0.001). However, there was no statistical association between the prevalence of anti-Dengue virus IgG with gender (p=0.4060) and residential area of patients (p=0.3896).

Conclusion: Findings from this study revealed that DENV infection is one of the etiological agents of acute febrile illnesses in Abuja. It's recommended that Dengue testing be considered during differential diagnosis of febrile patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2016.12.011DOI Listing
February 2017
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