Publications by authors named "Amornrat Aursalung"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Influence of Plant Origins and Seasonal Variations on Nutritive Values, Phenolics and Antioxidant Activities of Craib., an Endangered Species from Thailand.

Foods 2021 Nov 14;10(11). Epub 2021 Nov 14.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Craib. is an indigenous plant found in Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam that has become threatened owing to lack of knowledge about its agricultural management. This plant is now rare in the wild and was registered in the Plant Genetic Conservation Project under the initiation of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn (RSPG) to promote sustainable conservation and optimally beneficial utilization. has a long history of utilization as a nutrient-rich source with medicinal properties but scientific evidence of the veracity of these claims is limited. Here, the nutritional compositions, phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of different plant parts (young shoots and old leaves) of were investigated using plants collected from four areas of Thailand as Kamphaeng Phet (KP), Muang Nakhon Ratchasima (MN), Pakchong Nakhon Ratchasima (PN) and Uthai Thani (UT) at different harvesting periods (March-April, May-June and July-August). Results indicated that young shoots provided higher energy, protein, fat, dietary fiber, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc than old leaves. By contrast, nutrients such as total sugar, vitamin C, carotenoids, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and iron contents were higher in old leaves that also exhibited higher phenolic contents and most antioxidant activities than young shoots. Generally, most nutrients, phenolic contents, and antioxidant activities exhibited no clear trend among different plant origins. The harvesting period of July-August provided a suitable climate for biosynthesis of most nutrients, while high phenolics were mainly found in samples harvested in March-April. No clear trend was observed in the prevalence of antioxidant activities that varied according to assay techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10112799DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8623237PMC
November 2021

A Comparison of the Nutritional and Biochemical Quality of Date Palm Fruits Obtained Using Different Planting Techniques.

Molecules 2021 Apr 13;26(8). Epub 2021 Apr 13.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Date palm fruit ( L.) is commonly consumed around the world and has recently become an economical crop in Eastern Thailand, especially the Barhi cultivar that can be consumed as fresh fruit. To maintain genetic qualities, date palm is populated through cell culture. This leads to high production costs, while access to this technique is limited. Increasing date palm population by simple seed planting is currently of interest as an alternative for local farmers. Nevertheless, information on nutritive values, bioactive compounds, and health-promoting bioactivities of seed originating from date palm fruit is unavailable. Effects of different planting origins (cell culture origin (CO) and seed origin (SO)) of date palm fruits at the Khalal stage of Barhi cultivar were investigated for nutritive values, bioactive compounds, and in vitro health-promoting properties via key enzyme inhibitions against obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV), Alzheimer's disease (cholinesterases and β-secretase), and hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme). Waste seeds as a by-product from date palm production were also examined regarding these properties to increase seed marketing opportunities for future food applications and other health-related products. CO and SO exhibited insignificant differences in energy, fat, and carbohydrate contents. SO had higher protein, dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin E, and calcium contents than CO, while CO contained higher contents of fructose, glucose and maltose. Higher phenolic contents in SO led to greater enzyme inhibitory activities than CO. Interestingly, seeds of date palm fruits mostly contained higher nutritive values than the flesh. No carotenoids were detected in seeds but higher phenolic contents resulted in greater enzyme inhibitory activities than recorded for fruit flesh. Results suggest that appropriate planting of date palm can support the development of novel date palm fruit products, leading to expansion of economic opportunities and investment in date palm fruit agriculture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26082245DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069938PMC
April 2021

The Effect of Steaming and Fermentation on Nutritive Values, Antioxidant Activities, and Inhibitory Properties of Tea Leaves.

Foods 2021 Jan 8;10(1). Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Fermented tea (Cha-miang in Thai) is a local product made by traditional food preservation processes in Northern Thailand that involve steaming fresh tea leaves followed by fermenting in the dark. Information on changes in nutritive values, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activities, and health properties that occur during the steaming and fermenting processes of tea leaves is, however, limited. Changes in nutritive values, phenolics, antioxidant activities, and in vitro health properties through inhibition of key enzymes that control obesity (lipase), diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase), hypertension (angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)), and Alzheimer's disease (cholinesterases (ChEs) and β-secretase (BACE-1)) of fermented tea were compared to the corresponding fresh and steamed tea leaves. Results showed that energy, carbohydrate, and vitamin B1 increased after steaming, while most nutrients including protein, dietary fiber, vitamins (B2, B3, and C), and minerals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Zn) decreased after the steaming process. After fermentation, energy, fat, sodium, potassium, and iron contents increased, while calcium and vitamins (B1, B2, B3, and C) decreased compared to steamed tea leaves. However, the contents of vitamin B1 and iron were insignificantly different between fresh and fermented tea leaves. Five flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, cyanidin, myricetin, and apigenin) and three phenolic acids (gallic acid, caffeic acid, and -coumaric acid) were identified in the tea samples. Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities increased significantly after steaming and fermentation, suggesting structural changes in bioactive compounds during these processes. Steamed tea exhibited high inhibition against lipase, α-amylase, and α-glucosidase, while fermented tea possessed high anti-ChE and anti-ACE activities. Fresh tea exhibited high BACE-1 inhibitory activity. Results suggest that tea preparations (steaming and fermentation) play a significant role in the amounts of nutrients and bioactive compounds, which, in turn, affect the in vitro health properties. Knowledge gained from this research will support future investigations on in vivo health properties of fermented tea, as well as promote future food development of fermented tea as a healthy food.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10010117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7827290PMC
January 2021

Nutritional composition of conserved spp. plants in Northern Thailand.

Heliyon 2020 Jul 16;6(7):e04451. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon, Nakhon Pathom, 73170, Thailand.

The genus comprises woody vine plants belonging to the family . Species are found mostly in Northern Thailand and widely consumed by the local population. Occurrences of these wild fruits are rare as they only grow naturally in forest areas. Nutritive values of spp. remain unclear, leading to improper management for food applications. Nutritional composition of spp. was evaluated to promote sustainable conservation. Nutritive values in different fruits parts (exocarp, mesocarp, seed and core) of two species as (Lem.) A.C. Sm. and (Roxb.) Craib, from Chiang Rai Province, Thailand were assessed. When comparing nutritional contents based on per 100 g dry weight, results suggested that exhibited higher carbohydrate (1-2 times), sugar (1-2 times) and vitamin C (3-4 times) contents than , while the latter possessed higher fat (1-2 times), protein (1.6-1.9 times), and dietary fiber (1.5-1.8 times) contents. Considering each fruit part, the mesocarp (the only edible fruit part) and exocarp of both species provided high dietary fiber (11.6-20.9% recommended dietary fiber) and vitamin C (as high as 73% recommended per day) but were low in energy (30-40 kcal/100 g fresh weight), protein (0.6-1.2% recommended per day), fat (0.5-1.8% recommended per day) and sugar (2.4-5.4% recommended per day). Interestingly, seed contained higher energy (1-2 times), protein (2-3 times) and fat (4-50 times) than the other fruit parts. Results support the potential consumption of spp. as a healthy fruit that can be used for future food applications. Seed and exocarp from spp. also showed potential for new product development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04451DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7365980PMC
July 2020
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