Publications by authors named "Amlendu Yadav"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Unilateral deep vein thrombosis with gangrene involving the ascending aorta with sepsis and pulmonary thromboembolism-a pertinent cutaneous marker of severity of COVID-19.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2021 May 12. Epub 2021 May 12.

Department of Critical Care Medicine, Atal Bihari Vajpayee Institute of Medical sciences and Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi, India.

While myriad skin manifestations have been reported with COVID, they are insignificant as compared to the number of cases and do not indicate specificity as the studies that report them have either been based on telephonic consultation or have not been compared with case-control analysis from a normal skin OPD or IPD referral population. The most feared complication of COVID-19 is the combination of coagulopathy and thromboembolism, which is consequent to thrombo-inflammation and a heightened prothrombotic state. It is exaggerated in severe COVID associated with sepsis and skin manifestations that correlate with severity are more useful to clinicians. We had a case of COVID-positive 65-year-old man with features of thromboembolism followed by general symptoms of cough and fever. D-dimer test was positive, and the Ultrasound Doppler showed thrombosis in the right lower limb arteries and deep vein thrombosis in right lower limb veins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.14213DOI Listing
May 2021

One Year of Experience with H1N1 Infection: Clinical Observations from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India.

Indian J Community Med 2011 Jul;36(3):241-3

Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, Connaught Place, New Delhi, India E-mail:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0970-0218.86533DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3214457PMC
July 2011

Comparative evaluation of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with and without H1N1 infection at a tertiary care referral center.

Indian J Anaesth 2011 Jan;55(1):47-51

Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, Connaught Place, New Delhi, India.

H1N1 subtype of influenza A virus has clinical presentation ranging from mild flu like illness to severe lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of our study was to compare the demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, and mortality of critically ill patients with (H1N1+) and without H1N1 infection (H1N1-). We retrospectively analyzed medical charts of patients admitted in "Swine Flu ICU" with ARDS from August 2009 to May 2010. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was used for detection of H1N1 virus in the respiratory specimens. Clinical data from 106 (H1N1, 45; H1N1+, 61) patients was collected and compared. Mean delay in presentation to our hospital was 5.7 ± 3.1 days and co-morbidities were present in two-fifth of the total admissions. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of patients with and without H1N1 infection was comparable; 7.8 ± 3.5 and 6.6 ± 3.1 on day 1 and 7.2 ± 4.5 and 6.5 ± 3.1 on day 3, respectively. H1N1+ patients were relatively younger in age (34.2 ± 12.9 years vs. 42.8 ± 18.1, P = 0.005) but presented with significantly lower PaO(2):FiO(2) ratio (87.3 ± 48.7 vs. 114 ± 51.7) in comparison to those who subsequently tested as H1N1. The total leucocyte counts were significantly lower in H1N1+ patients during the first four days of illness but incidence of renal failure (P = 0.02) was higher in H1N1+ patients. The mortality in both the groups was high (H1N1+, 77%; H1N1, 68%) but comparable. There was a mean delay of 5.7 ± 3.1 days in initiation of antivirals. Patients with H1N1 infection were relatively younger in age and with a significantly higher incidence of refractory hypoxia and acute renal failure. Mortality from ARDS reported in our study in both the groups was high but comparable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5049.76602DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3057245PMC
January 2011

Flucytosine for treatment of Candida albicans in H1N1-positive patient.

Indian J Pharmacol 2010 Oct;42(5):318-9

Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Dr Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, Connaught Place, New Delhi - 110 001, India.

A 17-year-old H1N1-positive patient was successfully extubated after 25 days of ventilatory support for treatment of viral pneumonia which was complicated by empyema thoracis due to Candida albicans. Hematogenous spread was suspected as simultaneous culture of ascitic fluid identified Candida species sensitive to flucytosine but resistant to amphotericin B and azole group of antifungals. Monotherapy with flucytosine led to clinical and radiological improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0253-7613.70398DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2959217PMC
October 2010