Publications by authors named "Amir Nasimfar"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of serum procalcitonin level with erythrocytes sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and blood culture in the diagnosis of bacterial infections in patients hospitalized in Motahhari hospital of Urmia (2016).

J Adv Pharm Technol Res 2018 Oct-Dec;9(4):147-152

Department of Pediatric, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran.

Blood infection is one of the causes of morbidity in hospitalized patients. While some scholars have identified procalcitonin (PCT) as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of blood infection, others have questioned its diagnostic value. Thus, the present study was conducted to compare the diagnostic values of PCT with C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, and blood culture in patients with bacterial blood infections. In a prospective case-control study, 45 septic patients (6 months-5 years old), who were hospitalized in Shahid Motahhari Hospital of Urmia over the year 2016 and 45 patients with noninfectious diseases, whose gender and age range were similar to the members of the septic group, were examined. The participants' blood samples were taken for the sake of blood culture and measurement of PCT level, ESR, and CRP. Finally, the collected data were analyzed through the SPSS-21 software. the results indicated that the average PCT, ESR, CRP, and WBC count was significantly higher in septic patients. Moreover, the blood culture of patients with negative or intermediate serum PCT levels was negative, while 50% of blood culture results in patients with positive PCT were positive and the rest were negative. Finally, a significant relationship was detected between the frequency of blood culture results and results of serum PCT tests ( = 0.003). serum PCT level can be considered a diagnostic marker of bacterial infections. If used in conjunction with tests of CRP, ESR, and WBC count, the PCT test can enhance the diagnosis of bacterial infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/japtr.JAPTR_319_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302684PMC
January 2019

Gastro-intestinal basidiobolomycosis in a 2-year-old boy: dramatic response to potassium iodide.

Paediatr Int Child Health 2018 05 4;38(2):150-153. Epub 2016 Jul 4.

a Professor Alborzi Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Nemazee Hospital , Shiraz University of Medical Sciences , Shiraz , Iran.

Gastro-intestinal basidiobolomycosis (GIB) is a rare fungal infection caused by Basidiobolus ranarum. Treatment includes surgical resection and long-term antifungal therapy. A 2.5-year-old boy presented with a 10-day history of abdominal pain, fever and diarrhoea, and a palpable abdominal mass was detected. Resection was undertaken and histology confirmed basidiobolomycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B and itraconazole was commenced, but the infection progressed and spread to involve the intestines, liver, ribs and lung, and also the abdominal wall after 6 months, requiring four operative procedures. Because of unresponsiveness to amphotericin and itraconazole, oral potassium iodide was added which resulted in complete resolution of the infection. Potassium iodide is an essential component of the treatment of systemic B. ranarum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20469047.2016.1186343DOI Listing
May 2018

SEROLOGICAL RESPONSE TO VACCINES IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETES.

Roum Arch Microbiol Immunol 2015 Jul-Dec;74(3-4):112-7

Objective: Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more susceptible to infections. Deficiency in some domains of immune system could be one of the main reasons, which increases the risk of infections. The aim of this study was to assess antibody responses to vaccines in a group of children with diabetes and in the controls.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed among 90 children under 15 years of age with a history of type 1 DM, referred to endocrinology clinics of university hospitals; Mofid Children Hospital and Loghman Hospital. Also, we enrolled ninety healthy children as the control group. Antibody levels against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella and hepatitis B (HB) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

Results: Among 90 patients with diabetes, 48% were male and 52% were female and in the control group 49% were male and 51% were female. Regarding IgG antibody levels against measles, there was not any significant difference between the two groups, but according to the applied kit, IgG levels against measles vaccine were positive in 62% of the diabetic and 84% of the controls. Also, there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of IgG antibody level against rubella, but consistent with the applied kit, there was not any significant difference between the two the groups.

Conclusion: Given the results of the study, no difference was found between patients with diabetes and controls who were vaccinated with pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, mumps and HB vaccines. But there are some concerns about measles and rubella vaccinations that need further investigation.
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July 2016

A case of hepatic fasciolosis presented with prolonged Fever in southern iran.

Iran J Public Health 2015 Feb;44(2):279-81

Pathology Department, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Human fasciolosis is deemed as an emerging/re-emerging infection, hence making it an important human parasitic disease. In contrast to northern parts of Iran, human cases of fasciolosis in southern Iran are rare and sporadic. We report a sporadic case of fasciolosis in southern Iran (Fars Province) who presented with prolonged fever. Our report could suggest that there might be new foci emerging in the region, which indicates the need for further investigations.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4401888PMC
February 2015