Publications by authors named "Amir Houshang Sharifi"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Single-pill Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir for Treating Hepatis C in Patients Co-infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

Int J Clin Pract 2021 Apr 30:e14304. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: The current recommendation for treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) in HIV patients includes the combination of sofosbuvir (SOF) and daclatasvir (DCV). DCV should be used at different doses to compensate for interactions with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Up to three pills a day might be required which will significantly add to the pill burden of these patients. In this study, we have used a single-tablet approach to treating HCV-HIV coinfection.

Methods: Patients coinfected with HIV and HCV were prospectively enrolled from 10 centers throughout the country. Patients received a single once-daily fixed dose combination (FDC) pill containing 400 mg SOF and 30, 60, or 90 mg DCV depending on the type of ART they were receiving for 12 or 24 weeks. (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT03369327).

Results: 233 patients were enrolled from 10 centers. 23 patients were lost to follow-up and 2 patients died from causes unrelated to treatment. 208 patients completed the treatment course of which 201 achieved SVR (96.6%).

Conclusion: Single-tablet combination of DCV and SOF is an effective and safe treatment for patients coinfected with HIV and HCV. The combination works well in patients on ART in which dose adjustment is required. Patients with cirrhosis, previous treatment failure, and various genotypes respond identically. The expenses of genotyping can be saved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.14304DOI Listing
April 2021

Changes in liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C after successful direct-acting antiviral therapy.

Int J Clin Pract 2021 Mar 11:e14145. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction And Objectives: After successful treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), the stage of liver fibrosis decreases over time. Here, we aimed to assess the changes in the liver fibrosis stage using transient elastography (TE) after successful DAA therapy in HCV-infected cirrhotic patients who were referred to Shariati hospital from 2016 to 2017.

Material And Methods: In this observational cohort, all HCV-infected cirrhotic patients who were treated with a combination of sofosbuvir/daclatasvir, had sustained virologic response (SVR), and had undergone pre- and post-treatment TE, were enrolled. The primary outcome was the changes in TE parameters six months after the end of treatment compared with baseline.

Results: A total of 442 eligible subjects received DAA therapy. Overall, the SVR rate was 96.6%. Of these, 149 patients had completed the protocol and were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 56.1 ± 10.3 years and the predominant sex was male (77.9%). The median (Q -Q ) liver stiffness (LS) value at baseline was 26.3 kPa (18.1-38 kPa), which significantly decreased to 20.9 kPa (12-29.7 kPa) [z = -8.45, P-value < .001]. Also, the liver steatosis of patients with baseline CAP ≥ 220 dB/m had a significant response to treatment [z = -2.3, P-value = .023]. Based on multivariate analysis, a higher baseline liver fibrosis stage was the only determinant of LS values improvement in our study.

Conclusion: Successful HCV eradication in patients with liver fibrosis results in significant improvement in LS, even in cirrhotic patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.14145DOI Listing
March 2021

The combination of sofosbuvir and daclatasvir is effective and safe in treating patients with hepatitis C and severe renal impairment.

J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2020 Sep 5;35(9):1590-1594. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background And Aim: Many of the treatment regimens available for hepatitis C include sofosbuvir. Unfortunately, sofosbuvir has not been recommended for use in patients with severe renal impairment leaving these group of patients with very few options. Nevertheless, there are many reports in which these patients have been treated with sofosbuvir-containing regiments without important adverse events. This study aims at determining the safety and effectiveness of a sofosbuvir-based treatment in patients with severe renal impairment, including those on hemodialysis.

Method: We enrolled subjects with hepatitis C and estimated glomerular filtration rate under ml/min/1.73m from 13 centers in Iran. Patients were treated for 12 weeks with a single daily pill containing 400-mg sofosbuvir and 60-mg daclatasvir. Patients with cirrhosis were treated for 24 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated 12 weeks after end of treatment (sustained viral response [SVR]). ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03063879.

Results: A total of 103 patients were enrolled from 13 centers. Seventy-five patients were on hemodialysis. Thirty-nine had cirrhosis and eight were decompensated. Fifty-three were Genotype 1, and 27 Genotype 3. Twenty-seven patients had history of previous failed interferon-based treatment. Three patients died in which cause of death was not related to treatment. Six patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 94 patients all achieved SVR. No adverse events leading to discontinuation of medicine was observed.

Conclusions: The combination of sofosbuvir and daclatasvir is an effective and safe treatment for patients infected with all genotypes of hepatitis C who have severe renal impairment, including patients on hemodialysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgh.14994DOI Listing
September 2020

Excision of endosymbiotic bacteria from yeast under aging and starvation stresses.

Infect Genet Evol 2020 03 11;78:104141. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Although infrequent in our laboratory, growth of bacterial colonies has been observed on top of the purified cultures of yeasts. In this study, the likelihood of bacterial excision from yeast under aging and starvation stresses was assessed using 10 gastric and 10 food-borne yeasts. Yeasts were identified as members of Candida or Saccharomyces genus by amplification and sequencing of D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA. For aging stress, yeasts were cultured on brain heart infusion agar supplemented with sheep blood and incubated at 30 °C for 3-4 weeks. For starvation stress, yeasts were inoculated into distilled water and incubated similarly. After seven days, starved yeasts were cultured on yeast extract glucose agar, incubated similarly and examined daily for appearance of bacterial colonies on top of the yeast's growth. Outgrowth of excised bacteria was observed on top of the cultures of 4 yeasts (Y1, Y3, Y13 and Y18) after 3-7 days. The excised bacteria (B1, B3, B13 and B18) were isolated and identified at the genus level according to their biochemical characteristics as well as amplification and sequencing of 16S rDNA. B1 (Arthrobacter) were excised from Y1 (Candida albicans) upon aging and B3 (Staphylococcus), B13 (Cellulomonas) and B18 (Staphylococcus) were excised from their respective yeasts; Y3 (Candida tropicalis), Y13 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Y18 (Candida glabrata) upon starvation. DNA from yeasts was used for detection of 16S rDNA of their intracellular bacteria and sequencing. Amplified products from yeasts showed sequence similarity to those of excised bacteria. Under normal conditions, yeast exerts tight control on multiplication of its intracellular bacteria. However, upon aging and starvation the control is no longer effective and bacterial outgrowth occurs. Unlimited multiplication of excised bacteria might provide yeast with plenty of food in close vicinity. This could be an evolutionary dialogue between yeast and bacteria that ensures the survival of both partners.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meegid.2019.104141DOI Listing
March 2020

Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of Pancreas; A Case Series and Review Literature.

Middle East J Dig Dis 2016 Apr;8(2):102-8

Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

BACKGROUND Information regarding solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is limited in Iran. We aimed to review the clinicocytopathological features and follow-up of patients with SPN of pancreas who were diagnosed in a single center in Iran. METHODS Seven patients with SPN of the pancreas were diagnosed during January 2010 to March 2015 at the Digestive Disease Research Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients were reviewed prospectively. RESULTS Six out of the 7 patients were female and the mean age of all the patients was 29.4 years ranging from 15 to 61 years. The most common clinical presentation was nonspecific abdominal pain (N=6). The tumors were located mostly in head and neck of the pancreas. SPN was diagnosed in all patients by fine needle aspiration through endosonography (EUS-FNA). All patients underwent surgery. Histological findings of surgical tissues were consistent with EUS-FNA. The postoperative follow-up period of about 14 months was uneventful. CONCLUSION SPN of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor which affects primarily young women. EUS-guided FNA could play an important role in preoperative diagnosis of SPN of the pancreas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/mejdd.2016.14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4885608PMC
April 2016

Evaluation of methods for H. pylori detection in PPI consumption using culture, rapid urease test and smear examination.

Ann Transl Med 2015 Jan;3(1):11

1 Department of Microbiology, School of Biology, University College of Sciences, University of Tehran, Tehran 14176-14411, Iran ; 2 Digestive Disease Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14117-13135, Iran.

Background: Culture, rapid urease test (RUT) and smear examination have been used as reliable methods for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Accurate performance of these tests requires good quality biopsies with considerable number of bacterial cells. However, consumption of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) affects growth and urease activity of H. pylori, leading to false negative results. In this study the efficacy of culture, RUT and smear examination was assessed and the effect of PPI consumption was evaluated.

Methods: Two antral biopsies from 530 dyspeptic patients with and without PPI consumption were used for RUT, culture and smear examination. Statistical analysis was used to determine the association between results of culture, RUT or smear examination and PPI consumption. Sensitivity and specificity of three tests were calculated by standard methods.

Results: H. pylori infection was detected in 40% of patients by culture, 48.3% by RUT and 21.1% by smear examination and the overall detection rate was 54%. A strong correlation was found between PPI consumption and negative results of culture and RUT (P<0.05) but not smear examination. The sensitivity of RUT was reduced as a result of PPI consumption. This reduction was more profound in 1-hr RUT (92.2% to 74.4%) compared with 24-hr RUT (93.9% to 81.6%).

Conclusions: Prevalence of H. pylori was declined, compared with previous studies. This decrement could be due to false negative results of H. pylori diagnostic tests, among which culture and RUT are mostly affected by PPI. Accordingly, PPI consumption should be stopped before performance of endoscopy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2305-5839.2014.11.16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4293475PMC
January 2015

Efficacy of adding metformin to pegylated interferon and ribavirin in treatment naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C: a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

Middle East J Dig Dis 2014 Jan;6(1):13-7

Liver and Pancreatobiliary Disease Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

BACKGROUND Evidence indicates that insulin resistance results in poor sustained viral response (SVR) in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic agent which improves insulin resistance. METHODS We sought to determine if the addition of metformin to the treatment regimen could improve SVR in treatment-naïve CHC patients in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. We randomized 140 consecutive CHC patients to receive either metformin 500 mg three times a day or placebo in addition to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Only treatment-naïve subjects aged between 15 and 65 years of age were included. SVR was defined as no detectable HCV RNA six months after the end of treatment.Subjects who received at least one dose of PEG-IFN were included in the finala nalysis. RESULTS The SVR rate in the metformin group was 75% versus 79% in controls (intention-to-treat) which was not significantly different. Also, the difference between the placebo and metformin group was not significant in subsets of different genotypes or those with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels greater than 2 or body mass index greater than 25. The most common complaint was gastrointestinal discomfort (13% in metformin group versus 4% in controls; p=0.002) that lead to discontinuation of metformin in 8 participants. CONCLUSION Although triple therapy with metformin, PEG-IFN and RBV is relatively well tolerated, the addition of metformin did not significantly improve viral response in CHC patients.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4005479PMC
January 2014

Diagnostic value of fecal calprotectin in patient with ulcerative colitis.

Middle East J Dig Dis 2013 Apr;5(2):76-80

Digestive Diseases Research Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation limited to the mucosal layer of the colon. Calprotectin is a zinc and calcium binding protein derived from neutrophils and monocytes. It is easily detectable in tissue samples, body fluids, and stools, which makes it a potentially valuable marker of inflammation. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the value of fecal calprotectin (FC) as a marker of disease activity in patients with UC.

Methods: Seventy three eligible subjects underwent ileocolonoscopy and multiple biopsies were obtained from different parts of the colon and terminal ileum. All patients underwent blood and stool sampling as well as an interview to assess the disease severity utilizing ulcerative colitis activity index (UCAI), subjectively. The diagnostic value of the FC in comparison with Mayo disease activity index as the gold standard technique, was then evaluated.

Results: Mean FC level increased linearly according to Mayo disease activity index (r=0.44, p<0.001) and was significantly different between levels of Mayo disease activity index (p=0.003). In multivariate analysis, Mayo disease activity index, positive CRP and ESR were associated with FC level. FC level > 21.4 ng/ml was able to discriminate between active and inactive phases of UC according to Mayo disease activity index>2 with 72.3% sensitivity and 73.1% specificity. The combination of FC > 21.4 ng/ml and UCAI score of 7 had a 46.8% sensitivity and 88% specificity to diagnose Mayo disease activity index >2. Furthermore, FC level <21.4 ng/ml in combination with UCAI score of <3 showed a highly considerable specificity of 98% to discriminate the remission phase of UC (Mayo disease activity index <2), although with a low sensitivity (31%).

Conclusion: FC appears to be a non-invasive biomarker with moderate accuracy to discriminate the active phase of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The value of FC especially in combination with UCAI is highly considerable to rule out the Mayo disease activity index >2.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3990145PMC
April 2013

Gastric cancer mortality in a high incidence area: long-term follow-up of Helicobacter pylori-related precancerous lesions in the general population.

Arch Iran Med 2013 Jun;16(6):343-7

Digestive Disease Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Due to a lack of clear criteria for recognizing subjects at risk of progression to gastric cancer (GC), this cohort study seeks to identify predictors of GC death in a high-risk population.

Methods: During 2000-2001, 1011 randomly selected residents of Ardabil, Iran without a history of gastrointestinal diseases, underwent upper endoscopy with targeted biopsy sampling. Until 2013, cancer mortality data were obtained using cancer and death registry data and verbal autopsy reports. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR).

Results: A total of 3.95% of the participants [mean age: 53.1 ± 9.9 years, 49.8% males, and 88.2% Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori-positive)] died of GC. In the multivariate model, precancerous lesions at the beginning of follow-up were associated with increased GC mortality. The HR [95% confidence interval (CI)] was 7.4 (1.6-33.8) for atrophic gastritis (AG) and 23.6 (5.5-102.3) for intestinal metaplasia (IM). Age over 50 (HR = 4.4; 1.3-14.2), family history of GC (HR = 6.8; 3.3-13.8), smoking (HR = 7.4; 3.2-17.3), and endoscopically confirmed gastric ulcer (GU, HR = 6.5; 2.5-16.4) were independently associated with GC mortality. The concomitant presence of a precancerous lesion increased the HR to 46.5 (10.8-198.6) for a family history of GC, 27.6 (6.5-116.4) for smoking, and 25.1 (6.3-105.3) for age >50 years.

Conclusions: In this population with a high rate of H. pylori infection, age over 50 years, smoking, family history of GC, IM, AG, and in particular, an undiagnosed GU were significant independent risk factors for mortality due to GC. The assessment of a combination of these risk factors might identify individuals at risk of GC who could possibly benefit from regular surveillance.
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http://dx.doi.org/013166/AIM.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5812276PMC
June 2013

The role of mother's oral and vaginal yeasts in transmission of Helicobacter pylori to neonates.

Arch Iran Med 2013 May;16(5):288-94

Department of Microbiology, School of Biology, University College of Sciences, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Oral cavity has been proposed as an important reservoir of H.pylori, being implicated in bacterial transmission through oral-oral route. However, some investigators believe that the newborn acquires H.pylori from mother through vaginal delivery. In this study, oral and vaginal yeasts were examined for the intracellular occurrence of H.pylori and their possible role in bacterial transmission. 

Methods: Sixty nine oral and vaginal yeasts from expecting mothers (39 oral and 30 vaginal) and seven oral yeasts from neonates(6/46 vaginal delivery, 1/43 cesarean) were identified and studied by light and fluorescent microscopy for observing the intracellular bacterium-like bodies(BLBs). Whole DNAs of yeasts were recruited for detection of H.pylori-specific genes. Urea breath test (UBT) was performed for detection of H.pylori infection in mothers. Stool antigen test (SAT) was used for detection of H.pylori antigens in infants' stool at birth and six months of age. 

Results: Oral yeasts were isolated more frequently from normally-delivered neonates. The frequency of H.pylori genes in mothers' vaginal yeasts was significantly higher than in mothers' oral yeasts. A significant correlation was found between the occurrence of H.pylori genes in vaginal yeasts and that in neonates' oral yeasts, occurrence of H.pylori genes in mothers' vaginal yeasts or neonates' oral yeasts, and UBT+ results in mothers.

Conclusion: C.albicans which colonizes the oral cavity of neonates through vaginal delivery or contact with environment or healthcare workers could be an important reservoir of H.pylori. Vaginal yeasts are more potent in accommodating H.pylori than oral yeasts. Accordingly, vaginal yeast is proposed as the primary reservoir of H.pylori which facilitates H.pylori transmission to neonates.
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http://dx.doi.org/013165/AIM.009DOI Listing
May 2013

Exacerbation of Skin Lesions in a 50 year old Man with Psoriasis during Treatment by Pegylated Interferon.

Middle East J Dig Dis 2012 Jan;4(1):48-50

Digestive Disease Research Institute (DDRI), Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran ; Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS (IRCHA), Department of Infectious Diseases, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Chronic hepatitis C might lead to several immunological dysfunctions. Studies have shown a positive association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and psoriasis. These results suggest that the infection may be one of the triggering factors for the development or exacerbation of psoriasis. Here, we present a case of chronic HCV infection with psoriasis who developed exacerbation of skin lesions during therapy with peginterferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin. We discuss the management, course and results of HCV treatment in this patient.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4017695PMC
January 2012

Assessing the prevalence of HIV among Afghan immigrants in Iran through rapid HIV testing in the field.

Acta Med Iran 2011 ;49(7):478-9

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

Throughout the world, many migrant and mobile populations are at elevated risk for HIV. Iran has a large immigrant population from neighboring Afghanistan; however, few data exist on the prevalence of HIV in this community. In 2008, we conducted a study to assess the presence of HIV infection among 477 immigrants in a town to the northeast of Tehran using a rapid test in the field. HIV prevalence was 0.2% (95% CI 0.005-1.2) with one person HIV-positive. We recommend periodic HIV sero-surveillance with detailed behavioral measures for this population in the future.
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January 2012

Bell's palsy associated with chronic HCV infection before and during peginterferon alfa and ribavirin therapy.

Arch Iran Med 2011 May;14(3):204-5

Digestive Disease Research Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Neuropsychiatric side effects of peg interferon-α (PEG-IFN-α) therapy consist of a large spectrum of symptoms. Organic personality syndrome, organic affective syndrome, psychotic manifestations and seizures are more common side effects of PEG-IFN-α whereas cranial neuropathy and movement disorders are less common. Bell's palsy is often idiopathic, but has been linked to some viral infections, particularly with herpes viruses. Other infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and Lyme disease, may also lead to idiopathic facial paralysis. Neither acute nor chronic Hepatitis C infection has been implicated previously in Bell's palsy, but PEG-IFN-α may play a role. Two patients with CHC who developed Bell's palsy before and during treatment with PEG-IFN-α and Ribavirin are presented here.
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http://dx.doi.org/011143/AIM.0013DOI Listing
May 2011

Lack of HIV infection among truck drivers in Iran using rapid HIV test.

J Res Med Sci 2010 Sep;15(5):287-9

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS (IRCHA), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HIV infection in Iranian long distance truck drivers using rapid HIV test.

Methods: The study included 400 consecutive participants in Bazargan city, north-west of Iran in the late 2008 and the early 2009.

Results: No HIV infection was observed among these long distance truck drivers.

Conclusions: Although results of this study is plausible compared to other similar studies, repeated surveys are necessary to know the trend of HIV infection in truckers in Iran.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3082827PMC
September 2010

Expansion of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

Iran J Immunol 2010 Sep;7(3):177-85

Department of Virology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran, e-mail:

Background: Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been involved in impaired immunity and may have a pivotal role in persistence of viral infections.

Objective: To develop a simple and reliable in-house three color flow cytometery of peripheral blood to understand the role of HCV infection in the increase of Tregs.

Methods: The level of naturally occurring CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (nTregs) in 20 chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients was compared to those of 15 healthy individuals by flowcytometry. In a different approach we performed permeabilization and intracellular staining before surface staining which allows the preservation of the surface molecules in the combined detection process and results in the normal frequency of nTregs in blood.

Results: Using the optimized method, it was shown that a significantly higher proportion of nTregs in the total CD4+ T cell population was seen in the peripheral blood of chronic HCV patients (0.83 ± 0.21%, p=0.05) as compared to controls (0.26 ± 0.1, p=0.05).

Conclusions: In accordance with other studies, we showed that HCV infection induces a dramatic increase in Tregs, which might contribute to the immune response failure during HCV infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/IJIv7i3A5DOI Listing
September 2010

Safety and efficacy of locally manufactured pegylated interferon in hepatitis C patients.

Arch Iran Med 2010 Jul;13(4):306-12

Digestive Disease Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of locally produced pegylated interferon-alpha2a in treatment-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C.

Methods: All treatment-naïve patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C who referred to two university based outpatient clinics in Tehran from December 2007 to May 2008 were enrolled. Exclusion criteria included the presence of a debilitating disease, decompensated cirrhosis, or refusal to participate in the study. Patients were treated with 180 microg pegylated interferon-alpha2a (Pegaferon) weekly and 800 - 1200 mg ribavirin daily for 24 or 48 weeks depending on genotype and weight. Viral and biochemical response and adverse drug reactions were recorded.

Results: A total of 108 patients were enrolled; 63 with genotype 1 and 45 with genotypes 2 and 3. The mean age of the patients was 39 years (range: 19 - 65). Ninety-seven patients completed the study and 76 achieved sustained viral response. The sustained viral response among patients completing the study was 67% for genotype 1 and 95% for genotypes 2 and 3. Adverse events were well tolerated and none led to discontinuation of treatment, however dose adjustment was necessitated in 16 patients. The most common adverse events were fatigue (73.5%), poor appetite (66.2%), and feverishness (57.4%). The mean hemoglobin drop was 2.9 g/dL.

Conclusion: Locally produced PEG-IFN in Iran is safe and effective in treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis C.
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http://dx.doi.org/010134/AIM.0010DOI Listing
July 2010