Publications by authors named "Amin Momeni Moghaddam"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Predictive Factors Associated with Anterolateral Ligament Injury in the Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear.

Indian J Orthop 2020 Sep 1;54(5):655-664. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: The earlier studies did not assess the associated factors of anterolateral ligament injury, comprehensively. We sought to evaluate the independent predictive factors of anterolateral ligament injury in the patients with anterior cruciate ligament tear. Ultrasound scan has an emerging role in the diagnosis of anterolateral ligament injury.

Materials And Methods: We included 198 patients with anterior cruciate ligament tear in this study. All the patients underwent knee ultrasound scan to diagnose the anterolateral ligament injury. The potential predictive factors of anterolateral ligament injury were compared between the patients with anterolateral ligament injury and the patients with the intact anterolateral ligament.

Results: In all the patients, the anterolateral ligament was seen in the tibial and femoral portions using the ultrasound scan. One hundred and ten patients (55.6%) had anterolateral ligament injury and the anterolateral ligament was intact in 88 patients (44.4%). The lateral collateral ligament injury was significantly associated with the anterolateral ligament injury ( < 0.001). In addition, the iliotibial band injury had a significant relationship with the anterolateral ligament injury ( = 0.001). An increased lateral tibial slope was significantly associated with the anterolateral ligament injury ( = 0.031). Furthermore, the bone contusion of the lateral femoral condyle had a significant relationship with the anterolateral ligament injury ( = 0.004).

Conclusion: The independent predictors of anterolateral ligament injury included the lateral collateral ligament injury, iliotibial band injury, bone contusion of the lateral femoral condyle, and an increased lateral tibial slope.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s43465-020-00159-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7429582PMC
September 2020

Mediastinal lymphadenopathy in pediatric tuberculosis in computed tomography scan.

Int J Mycobacteriol 2016 Dec 25;5 Suppl 1:S242-S243. Epub 2016 Nov 25.

Mycobacteriology Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background/objectives: Pediatric tuberculosis is usually a primary infection presenting mainly as mediastinal or hilar adenopathy in computed tomography (CT) scan. In this study, we study the distribution and other CT scan characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy in childhood tuberculosis.

Methods: Chest CT scans of 75 cases of pediatric tuberculosis at Masih Daneshvari Hospital in Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2013 were studied regarding characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

Results: Mean±standard deviation age of cases was 11.2±4.6years. Lymphadenopathy (mediastinal/hilar) was detected in 94.7% of cases. Most of the lymphadenopathies were located in the lower paratracheal (81.7%), upper paratracheal (69.1%), hilar (53.5%), and subcarinal (47.9%) stations. Perilymph node fatty stranding, lymphadenopathy conglomeration, bronchial pressure by the lymph nodes, and lymph node calcification were noted in 74.6%, 52.11%, 4.23%, and 5.6% of cases, respectively. Bilateral, right, and left lung parenchymal involvement were reported in 45%, 25%, and 8% of cases, respectively. Lung parenchymal involvement was significantly correlated with lymphadenopathies in subcarinal (p<0.001), hilar (p<0.001), subaortic (p=0.03), lower paratracheal (p=0.037), and axillary (p=0.006) stations. Right- and left-sided pleural effusions were observed in 12.7% and 7% of cases, respectively.

Conclusion: Attention to distribution and characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy can help differentiate tuberculosis from other causes of pediatric mediastinal lymphadenopathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmyco.2016.11.019DOI Listing
December 2016

Determining the lymphadenopathy characteristics of the mediastinum in lung CT scan of children with tuberculosis.

Int J Mycobacteriol 2016 09 15;5(3):306-312. Epub 2016 Jul 15.

Mycobacteriology Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Objective/background: Most tuberculosis cases in children are primary infection, with difficult and imprecise diagnosis mainly based on the existence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Here, we investigated the characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy in lung computed tomography (CT) scans of children with tuberculosis.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 75 children with tuberculosis referred to Masih Daneshvari Hospital in Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2013. Their medical records were investigated, and CT-scan characteristics were extracted by a radiologist.

Results: Mean±standard deviation age of cases was 11.2±4.6years. CT-scan results indicated 94.7% of cases had lymphadenopathy, with lower paratracheal, upper paratracheal, hilar, and subcarinal forms observed in 81.7%, 69.1%, 53.5%, and 47.9% of cases as the most involved stations in lymph nodes, respectively. In 74.6% of patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, perilymph node fat inflammation (matting) was observed, with 52.11% exhibiting conglomeration. Bronchial pressure was observed in 4.23% of children with tuberculosis, and bilateral-, right-, and left-parenchymal involvement was observed in 42.7%, 25.3%, and 8% of these cases, respectively. Left- and right-pleural effusion and calcification was reported in 6.7%, 12%, and 5.6% of patients, respectively. Additionally, nearly 80% of patients exhibited mediastinal lymphadenopathy and lung-parenchyma involvement simultaneously. Lung-parenchyma involvement was significantly correlated with subcarinal (p<.001), hilar (p<.001), subaortic (p=.030), lower paratracheal (p=.037), and axillary (p=.006) stations.

Conclusion: Situation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and its synchronicity with lung-parenchyma involvement can help in differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis from other lung diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmyco.2016.06.015DOI Listing
September 2016