Publications by authors named "Amelie Brisebois"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Neuroanatomical Correlates of Macrolinguistic Aspects in Narrative Discourse in Unilateral Left and Right Hemisphere Stroke: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2021 May 12;64(5):1650-1665. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Linguistics Department, School of Humanities, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Background A growing body of literature has demonstrated the importance of discourse assessment in patients who suffered from brain injury, both in the left and right hemispheres, as discourse represents a key component of functional communication. However, little is known about the relationship between gray matter density and macrolinguistic processing. Purpose This study aimed to investigate this relationship in a group of participants with middle-low to low socioeconomic status. Method Twenty adults with unilateral left hemisphere ( = 10) or right hemisphere ( = 10) chronic ischemic stroke and 10 matched (age, education, and socioeconomic status) healthy controls produced three oral narratives based on sequential scenes. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was conducted using structural magnetic resonance imaging. Results Compared to healthy controls, the left hemisphere group showed cohesion impairments, whereas the right hemisphere group showed impairments in coherence and in producing macropropositions. Cohesion positively correlated with gray matter density in the right primary sensory area (PSA)/precentral gyrus and the pars opercularis. Coherence, narrativity, and index of lexical informativeness were positively associated with the left PSA/insula and the superior temporal gyrus. Macropropositions were mostly related to the left PSA/insula and superior temporal gyrus, left cingulate, and right primary motor area/insula. Discussion Overall, the present results suggest that both hemispheres are implicated in macrolinguistic processes in narrative discourse. Further studies including larger samples and with various socioeconomic status should be conducted. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14347550.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2020_JSLHR-20-00500DOI Listing
May 2021

Word-finding in confrontation naming and picture descriptions produced by individuals with early post-stroke aphasia.

Clin Neuropsychol 2020 Sep 13:1-16. Epub 2020 Sep 13.

Centre de recherche de l'Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Objective: The present study aims to assess the relationship between quantitative measures of connected speech production and performance in confrontation naming in early post-stroke aphasia (8-14 days post-stroke). We collected connected speech samples elicited by a picture description task and administered a confrontation naming task to 20 individuals with early post-stroke aphasia and 20 healthy controls. Transcriptions were made in compliance with the CHAT format guidelines. Several micro- (i.e. duration, total number of words, words per minute, mean length of utterances, ratio of open- to closed-class words and noun-to-verb ratio, VOC-, repetitions, self-corrections, and phonological and semantic errors) and macrolinguistic (i.e. informativeness and efficiency) measures were extracted. We provide evidence for the presence of impairments in an array of micro- and macrolinguistic measures of speech in individuals with early post-stroke aphasia. We show that in the patient group, confrontation naming abilities most strongly relate to informativeness in a picture description task. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between performance in confrontation naming and in connected speech production in the first days after stroke onset and also suggest that discourse analysis may provide unique, possibly more complex information.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13854046.2020.1817563DOI Listing
September 2020

Predicting Early Post-stroke Aphasia Outcome From Initial Aphasia Severity.

Front Neurol 2020 21;11:120. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Centre de Recherche du Centre Intégré Universitaire de Santé et de Services Sociaux du Nord-de-l'Île-de-Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

The greatest degree of language recovery in post-stroke aphasia takes place within the first weeks. Aphasia severity and lesion measures have been shown to be good predictors of long-term outcomes. However, little is known about their implications in early spontaneous recovery. The present study sought to determine which factors better predict early language outcomes in individuals with post-stroke aphasia. Twenty individuals with post-stroke aphasia were assessed <72 h (acute) and 10-14 days (subacute) after stroke onset. We developed a composite score (CS) consisting of several linguistic sub-tests: repetition, oral comprehension and naming. Lesion volume, lesion load and diffusion measures [fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD)] from both arcuate fasciculi (AF) were also extracted using MRI scans performed at the same time points. A series of regression analyses were performed to predict the CS at the second assessment. Among the diffusion measures, only FA from right AF was found to be a significant predictor of early subacute aphasia outcome. However, when combined in two hierarchical models with FA, age and either lesion load or lesion size, the initial aphasia severity was found to account for most of the variance ( = 0.678), similarly to the complete models ( = 0.703 and = 0.73, respectively). Initial aphasia severity was the best predictor of early post-stroke aphasia outcome, whereas lesion measures, though highly correlated, show less influence on the prediction model. We suggest that factors predicting early recovery may differ from those involved in long-term recovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2020.00120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7047164PMC
February 2020