Publications by authors named "Amelia Bernardelli"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis 04-303, a Highly Virulent Strain from Argentina.

Genome Announc 2013 Nov 27;1(6). Epub 2013 Nov 27.

School of Computing, UFMS, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

Mycobacterium bovis strain 04-303 was isolated from a wild boar living in a free-ranging field in Argentina. This work reports the draft genome sequence of this highly virulent strain and the genomic comparison of its major virulence-related genes with those of M. bovis strain AF2122/97 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00931-13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3869323PMC
November 2013

Use of touch-down polymerase chain reaction to enhance the sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis detection.

J Vet Diagn Invest 2005 May;17(3):232-8

Instituto de Biotecnología, CICVyA/INTA, Los Reseros y las Cabañas, 1712 Castelar, Argentina.

The confirmatory diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in animal samples is carried out by culture in Stonebrink media. However, culture is very slow because of the extremely long duplication time of the bacillus and difficult because of the scarcity of bacilli in diagnostic samples. This study describes the development of a single-tube touch-down polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for the detection of M. bovis using primers that target the IS6110 element. Spiked water and milk as well as routine diagnostic samples (milk and nasal swabs) from M. bovis-positive cattle were tested. This protocol allows the rapid and sensitive detection of M. bovis in bovine samples by enhancing the sensitivity of standard PCR amplification.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/104063870501700303DOI Listing
May 2005

Multicenter evaluation of mycobacteria identification by PCR restriction enzyme analysis in laboratories from Latin America and the Caribbean.

J Microbiol Methods 2005 May 25;61(2):193-9. Epub 2004 Dec 25.

Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo-Escola Paulista de Medicina, Rua Botucatu, 862 3 degrees andar, São Paulo 04023-062, Brazil.

The identification of mycobacterial species in clinical isolates is essential for making patient care decisions. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) is a simple and rapid identification method, based on amplification of 441 bp of the hsp65 gene and restriction with BstEII and HaeIII. As a contribution to the validation of PRA, a multicenter study was performed in eight laboratories located in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, and Guadeloupe. Each laboratory received 18 coded isolates from the collection of the Institute of Tropical Medicine (Antwerp, Belgium), representing duplicates of nine laboratory strains: Mycobacterium terrae CIPT 140320001, Mycobacterium scrofulaceum CIPT 140220031, Mycobacterium flavescens ATCC 14474, Mycobacterium triviale ATCC 23292, Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum ATCC 19530, Mycobacterium chitae ATCC 19627, Mycobacterium abscessus ATCC 19977, Mycobacterium kansasii ATCC 12478, and Mycobacterium peregrinum ATCC 14467. A detailed protocol including amplification, enzymatic digestion, and gel preparation was provided to each laboratory. Two laboratories identified correctly all 18 (100%) isolates, one identified correctly 17 (94.5%), two identified 14 (77.7%), one identified 11 (61%), and two identified 8 (44.4%) isolates. Errors detected in laboratories with more than 77% accuracy were associated with electrophoresis running conditions and an unspecific amplicon produced by a single strain. Lower accuracy was mainly related to inappropriate use of DNA markers and insufficient training in interpretation of patterns. In conclusion, the PRA method was readily implemented in some Latin American and Caribbean laboratories of mycobacteria, but improvements in critical points, as gel running conditions and training in interpretiation of patterns, are needed in order to improve accuracy. In others, improvement in critical points is still necessary.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2004.11.015DOI Listing
May 2005

In vitro susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains isolated from seals to antituberculosis drugs.

Biomedica 2004 Jun;24 Supp 1:85-91

Reference Laboratory of Tuberculosis for MERCOSUR-DILACOT-SENASA, National Service of Sanity and Agricultural Quality (SENASA), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Mycobacteria strains belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex were isolated from seals found in the South Atlantic. The animals were received in Mundo Marino installations and treated for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by conventional therapy of intensive care and enriched food supply; however, in all cases treatment failed. Necropsies of all animals revealed extensive lesions compatible with tuberculosis involving lungs, liver, spleen and lymphatic nodes. Classical biochemical methods as well as molecular techniques using the IS6110 probes were performed for mycobacterial identification. Furthermore, the LCx M. tuberculosis assay (Abbott Laboratories) identified all strains as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members. The in vitro susceptibility pattern was examined in mycobacterial strains isolated from seven seals and in 3 reference strains--BCG, H37Rv (M. tuberculosis) and AN5 (Mycobacterium bovis)--to 4 medications--isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and ethambutol. Minimal inhibitory drug concentrations were determined by the Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (BD Argentina) method and a microdilution and colorimetric assay using 3-(4-5 dimethyltiazol-2)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide. All the isolates and the reference strains BCG and AN5 were inhibited by MIC values similar to those of H37Rv with good agreement obtained by both techniques. These findings suggest that a therapeutic regimen aimed to seals diagnosed with tuberculosis play an important role in the prevention of tuberculosis transmission from infected animals to humans that are in routine contact with them.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2004

Tuberculosis in seals caused by a novel member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex: Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2003 Sep;53(Pt 5):1305-1314

Departamento de Micobacterias, DILACOT, Servicio Nacional de Sanidad y Calidad Agroalimentaria (SENASA), Avda A Fleming 1653, (1640) Martínez, Argentina.

A comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from seals (pinnipeds) in Australia, Argentina, Uruguay, Great Britain and New Zealand was undertaken to determine their relationships to each other and their taxonomic position within the complex. Isolates from 30 cases of tuberculosis in six species of pinniped and seven related isolates were compared to representative and standard strains of the M. tuberculosis complex. The seal isolates could be distinguished from other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, including the recently defined 'Mycobacterium canettii' and 'Mycobacterium caprae', on the basis of host preference and phenotypic and genetic tests. Pinnipeds appear to be the natural host for this 'seal bacillus', although the organism is also pathogenic in guinea pigs, rabbits, humans, Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris) and, possibly, cattle. Infection caused by the seal bacillus is predominantly associated with granulomatous lesions in the peripheral lymph nodes, lungs, pleura, spleen and peritoneum. Cases of disseminated disease have been found. As with other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, aerosols are the most likely route of transmission. The name Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov. is proposed for this novel member of the M. tuberculosis complex (the type strain is 6482(T)=ATCC BAA-688(T)=NCTC 13288(T)).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/ijs.0.02401-0DOI Listing
September 2003