Publications by authors named "Amber Sleem"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Preimplant hyponatremia does not predict adverse outcomes in patient with left ventricular assist devices.

Curr Probl Cardiol 2022 May 2:101239. Epub 2022 May 2.

Division of Cardiology, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA; Section of Cardiomyopathy & Heart Transplantation, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA; The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Ochsner Clinical School, New Orleans, LA.

Background: Hyponatremia is a well-established marker of adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure (HF) but not well studied in patients with left ventricular assist device (LVAD).

Methods: This is a retrospective study, single center study of HM3 [Abbott, USA] LVAD implants. We divided our population based on their sodium prior to LVAD implantation - hyponatremia if <135 mEq/L and normal sodium if 135 - 145 mEq/L. We compared postoperative and long-term outcomes.

Results: A total of 195 patients were included, preimplant hyponatremia was present in 40% with a sodium of 132.1±2.1 vs. 137.8±1.9 mEq/L in the normal sodium group. No differences were observed in the postoperative or long-term outcomes.

Conclusion: Preimplant hyponatremia was not associated with mortality or HF admissions, likely due to adequate left ventricular unloading and resolution of the mechanisms that lead to hyponatremia. These results suggest that optimization of mild hyponatremia may not be critical and should not delay LVAD placement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpcardiol.2022.101239DOI Listing
May 2022

Suspected COVID-19-Induced Myopericarditis.

Ochsner J 2021 ;21(2):181-186

The University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine, Ochsner Clinical School, New Orleans, LA.

The incidence of myocarditis in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains unknown; however, increasing evidence links COVID-19 to cardiovascular complications such as arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, fulminant myocarditis, and cardiac death. We present a case of suspected COVID-19-induced myopericarditis and discuss the diagnostic implications, pathophysiology, and management. A 72-year-old female was admitted to the hospital with acute on chronic respiratory failure in the setting of COVID-19. The next day, she developed pressure-like retrosternal chest pain. Laboratory findings revealed elevated cardiac enzymes and inflammatory markers consistent with myocardial injury. Electrocardiogram revealed diffuse ST segment elevations without reciprocal changes, concerning for myopericarditis. Transthoracic echocardiography showed new findings of severely reduced left ventricular (LV) systolic function, with an estimated ejection fraction (EF) of 20%. Her hospital course was further complicated by cardiogenic shock that required treatment in the intensive care unit with vasopressors and inotropes. During the next few days, she had almost full recovery of her LV function, with EF improving to 50%. However, her clinical status deteriorated, likely the result of a bowel obstruction. She was transitioned to comfort care at the request of her family, and she died shortly after. This case highlights diagnostic and therapeutic challenges that physicians may encounter when managing acute cardiac injury in the setting of COVID-19. The multiple mechanisms of COVID-19-related myocardial injury may influence the approach to diagnosis and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31486/toj.20.0090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8238094PMC
January 2021

Leadless and Wireless Cardiac Devices: The Next Frontier in Remote Patient Monitoring.

Curr Probl Cardiol 2021 May 24;46(5):100800. Epub 2021 Jan 24.

John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA; Section of Cardiomyopathy & Heart Transplantation, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA; The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Ochsner Clinical School, New Orleans, LA. Electronic address:

In the last decade, advances in wireless and sensor technologies, and the implementation of telemedicine, have led to innovative digital health care for cardiac patients. Continuous monitoring of patients' biomedical signals, and acute changes in these signals, may result in timely, accurate diagnoses and implementation of early interventions. In this review, we discuss commonly used wireless and leadless cardiac devices including pulmonary artery pressure sensors, implantable loop recorders, leadless pacemakers and subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. We discuss the concept and function of each device, indications, methods of delivery, potential complications, consideration for implantation, and cost-effectiveness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpcardiol.2021.100800DOI Listing
May 2021
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