Publications by authors named "Amar Kanzaria"

5 Publications

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Motor vehicle accidents-related maxillofacial injuries: a multicentre and prospective study.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2019 Sep 13;128(3):199-204. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objectives: The purpose of this European multicenter prospective study was to obtain more precise information about the demographic characteristics and etiologic/epidemiologic patterns of motor vehicle accidents (MVA)-related maxillofacial fractures.

Study Design: Of the 3260 patients with maxillofacial fractures admitted within the study period, 326 traumas were caused by MVAs with a male/female ratio of 2.2:1.

Results: The maximum incidence was found in Zagreb (Croatia) (18%) and the minimum in Bergen (Norway) (0%). The most frequent mechanisms were car accidents, with 177 cases, followed by motorcycle accidents. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible, with 199 fractures, followed by maxillo-zygomatic-orbital (MZO) fractures.

Conclusions: In all the 3 groups (car, motorcycle, and pedestrian), mandibular and MZO fractures were the 2 most frequently observed fractures, with some variations. The importance of analyzing MVA-related facial injuries and their features and characteristics should be stressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2018.12.009DOI Listing
September 2019

Prevalence and predictive factors of psychological morbidity following facial injury: a prospective study of patients attending a maxillofacial outpatient clinic within a major UK city.

Dialogues Clin Neurosci 2018 12;20(4):327-339

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, the Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.

Adults presenting to maxillofacial surgery services are at high risk of psychological morbidity. This study examined the prevalence of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, drug and alcohol use, and appearance-related distress among maxillofacial trauma outpatients over medium-term follow-up. It also explored socio-demographic and injury-related variables associated with psychological distress to inform targeted psychological screening protocols for maxillofacial trauma services. Significant associations were found between level of distress at time of injury and number of traumatic life events with levels of depression at 3 months. No significant associations were found between predictor variables and PTSD at 3 months, or with any psychiatric diagnosis at 6 months. The lack of evidence for an identifiable subgroup of patients who were at higher risk of psychological distress indicated that routine screening of all maxillofacial trauma outpatients should be offered in order to best respond to their mental health needs. The feasibility of the medical team facilitating this is challenging and should ideally be undertaken by psychologists integrated within the MDT. This study led to the funding of a clinical psychologist to provide collaborative care with the maxillofacial surgeons, resulting in brief assessment and treatment to over 600 patients in the first year of the service.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436951PMC
December 2018

European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) in children: a multicenter and prospective study.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2015 May 24;119(5):499-504. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Department of Maxillofacial surgery, Stomatology Clinic, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

Objective: The aim of this study is to present and discuss the results of a European multicentre prospective study about pediatric maxillofacial trauma epidemiology during a year.

Study Design: The following data were recorded: gender, age, etiology, site of fracture, date of injury. Of the 3396 patients with maxillofacial fractures admitted within the study period, 114 (3.3%) were children aged 15 years and younger, with a male/female ratio of 2.6:1. Mean age was 10.9 years. Most patients (63%) were aged 11-15 years.

Results: The most frequent cause of injury was fall (36 patients). Sport injuries and assaults were almost limited to the oldest group, whereas falls were more uniformly distributed in the 3 groups. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible with 47 fractures. In particular, 18 condylar fractures were recorded, followed by 12 body fractures.

Conclusions: Falls can be acknowledged as the most important cause of facial trauma during the first years of life. The high incidence of sport accidents after 10 years may be a reason to increase the use of mouthguards and other protective equipment. Finally, the mandible (and in particular the condyle) was confirmed as the most frequent fracture site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.12.012DOI Listing
May 2015

Assault-related maxillofacial injuries: the results from the European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) multicenter and prospective collaboration.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2015 Apr 11;119(4):385-91. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Department of Maxillofacial surgery, Stomatology Clinic, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

Objective: The aim of this study is to present and discuss the demographic characteristics and patterns of assault-related maxillofacial fractures as reported by a European multicenter prospective study.

Study Design: Demographic and injury data were recorded for each patient who was a victim of an assault.

Results: Assaults represented the most frequent etiology of maxillofacial trauma with an overall rate of 39% and the values ranging between 60.8% (Kiev, Ukraine) and 15.4% (Bergen, Norway). The most frequent mechanisms of assault-related maxillofacial fractures were fists in 730 cases, followed by kicks and fists. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible (814 fractures), followed by orbito-zygomatic-maxillary complex fractures and orbital fractures.

Conclusions: Our data confirmed the strong possibility that patients with maxillofacial fractures may be victims of physical aggression. The crucial role of alcohol in assault-related fractures was also confirmed by our study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.12.004DOI Listing
April 2015

European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) project: a multicentre and prospective study.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2015 Jan 22;43(1):62-70. Epub 2014 Oct 22.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The purpose of this study was to analyse the demographics, causes and characteristics of maxillofacial fractures managed at several European departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery over one year. The following data were recorded: gender, age, aetiology, site of facial fractures, facial injury severity score, timing of intervention, length of hospital stay. Data for a total of 3396 patients (2655 males and 741 females) with 4155 fractures were recorded. The mean age differed from country to country, ranging between 29.9 and 43.9 years. Overall, the most frequent cause of injury was assault, which accounted for the injuries of 1309 patients; assaults and falls alternated as the most important aetiological factor in the various centres. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible with 1743 fractures, followed by orbital-zygomatic-maxillary (OZM) fractures. Condylar fractures were the most commonly observed mandibular fracture. The results of the EURMAT collaboration confirm the changing trend in maxillofacial trauma epidemiology in Europe, with trauma cases caused by assaults and falls now outnumbering those due to road traffic accidents. The progressive ageing of the European population, in addition to strict road and work legislation may have been responsible for this change. Men are still the most frequent victims of maxillofacial injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2014.10.011DOI Listing
January 2015