Publications by authors named "Amar H Sheth"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Exome Sequencing Implicates Impaired GABA Signaling and Neuronal Ion Transport in Trigeminal Neuralgia.

iScience 2020 Oct 11;23(10):101552. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Yale Center for Genome Analysis, West Haven, CT, USA.

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a common, debilitating neuropathic face pain syndrome often resistant to therapy. The familial clustering of TN cases suggests that genetic factors play a role in disease pathogenesis. However, no unbiased, large-scale genomic study of TN has been performed to date. Analysis of 290 whole exome-sequenced TN probands, including 20 multiplex kindreds and 70 parent-offspring trios, revealed enrichment of rare, damaging variants in GABA receptor-binding genes in cases. Mice engineered with a TN-associated mutation (p.Cys188Trp) in the GABA receptor Cl channel γ-1 subunit () exhibited trigeminal mechanical allodynia and face pain behavior. Other TN probands harbored rare damaging variants in Na and Ca channels, including a significant variant burden in the α-1H subunit of the voltage-gated Ca channel Ca3.2 (). These results provide exome-level insight into TN and implicate genetically encoded impairment of GABA signaling and neuronal ion transport in TN pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2020.101552DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7554653PMC
October 2020

Mutations disrupting neuritogenesis genes confer risk for cerebral palsy.

Nat Genet 2020 10 28;52(10):1046-1056. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Henan Key Laboratory of Child Brain Injury, Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.

In addition to commonly associated environmental factors, genomic factors may cause cerebral palsy. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 250 parent-offspring trios, and observed enrichment of damaging de novo mutations in cerebral palsy cases. Eight genes had multiple damaging de novo mutations; of these, two (TUBA1A and CTNNB1) met genome-wide significance. We identified two novel monogenic etiologies, FBXO31 and RHOB, and showed that the RHOB mutation enhances active-state Rho effector binding while the FBXO31 mutation diminishes cyclin D levels. Candidate cerebral palsy risk genes overlapped with neurodevelopmental disorder genes. Network analyses identified enrichment of Rho GTPase, extracellular matrix, focal adhesion and cytoskeleton pathways. Cerebral palsy risk genes in enriched pathways were shown to regulate neuromotor function in a Drosophila reverse genetics screen. We estimate that 14% of cases could be attributed to an excess of damaging de novo or recessive variants. These findings provide evidence for genetically mediated dysregulation of early neuronal connectivity in cerebral palsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-020-0695-1DOI Listing
October 2020

Patients with psychiatric illness report worse patient-reported outcomes and receive lower rates of autologous breast reconstruction.

Breast J 2020 10 11;26(10):1931-1936. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Psychiatric well-being impacts on general satisfaction and quality of life. This study explored how the presence of psychiatric diagnoses affects patient-reported outcomes in breast reconstruction and on selection of reconstructive modality. Patients who received breast reconstruction at a tertiary hospital between 2013 and 2018 and completed the BREAST-Q survey were included. BREAST-Q module scores were compared between patients who had a psychiatric diagnosis at presentation and the remaining cohort using t tests. General linear models (GLMs) were used to control for confounding factors. A chi-squared test was used to assess the effect on reconstructive modality, and binary logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Of the 471 patients included, 93 (19.7%) had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Cohorts did not differ significantly by age, BMI, race, ASA classification, or insurance status. Patients with a psychiatric diagnosis experienced a decrease in BREAST-Q scores for the Psychosocial Wellbeing (B = 9.16, P = .001) and Sexual Wellbeing (B = 9.29, P = .025) modules. On binary logistic regression, patients with a psychiatric diagnosis were less likely to receive autologous reconstruction compared with implant reconstruction (OR = 0.489, P = .010). The presence of psychiatric diagnoses is an independent predictor of decreased BREAST-Q. Furthermore, there is a significant disparity in modality of reconstruction given to patients with psychiatric diagnoses. Further study is needed to evaluate interventions to improve satisfaction among at-risk populations and evaluate the reason for low autologous reconstruction in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.13936DOI Listing
October 2020

Preresidency Publication Productivity of U.S. Neurosurgery Interns.

World Neurosurg 2020 05 31;137:e291-e297. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Background: Research experience is believed to be an important component of the neurosurgery residency application process. One measure of research productivity is publication volume. The preresidency publication volume of U.S. neurosurgery interns and any potential association between applicant publication volume and the match results of top-ranked residency programs have not been well characterized.

Objective: In this study, we sought to characterize the preresidency publication volume of U.S. neurosurgery residents in the 2018-2019 intern class using the Scopus database.

Methods: For each intern, we recorded the total number of publications, total number of first or last author publications, total number of neuroscience-related publications, mean number of citations per publication, and mean impact factor of the journal per publication. Preresidency publication volumes of interns at the top-25 programs (based on a composite ranking score according to 4 different ranking metrics) were compared with those at all other programs.

Results: We found that 82% of neurosurgery interns included in the analysis (190 interns from 95 programs) had at least 1 publication. The average number of publications per intern among all programs was 6 ± 0.63 (mean ± standard error of the mean). We also found that interns at top-25 neurosurgery residency programs tended to have a higher number of publications (8.3 ± 1.2 vs. 4.8 ± 0.7, P = 0.0137), number of neuroscience-related publications (6.8 ± 1.1 vs. 4.1 ± 0.7, P = 0.0419), and mean number of citations per publication (9.8 ± 1.7 vs. 5.7 ± 0.8, P = 0.0267) compared with interns at all other programs.

Conclusions: Our results provide a general estimate of the preresidency publication volume of U.S. neurosurgery interns and suggest a potential association between publication volume and matching in the top-25 neurosurgery residency programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.01.173DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7202965PMC
May 2020

Correlations between genomic subgroup and clinical features in a cohort of more than 3000 meningiomas.

J Neurosurg 2019 Oct 25:1-10. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

19Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Objective: Recent large-cohort sequencing studies have investigated the genomic landscape of meningiomas, identifying somatic coding alterations in NF2, SMARCB1, SMARCE1, TRAF7, KLF4, POLR2A, BAP1, and members of the PI3K and Hedgehog signaling pathways. Initial associations between clinical features and genomic subgroups have been described, including location, grade, and histology. However, further investigation using an expanded collection of samples is needed to confirm previous findings, as well as elucidate relationships not evident in smaller discovery cohorts.

Methods: Targeted sequencing of established meningioma driver genes was performed on a multiinstitution cohort of 3016 meningiomas for classification into mutually exclusive subgroups. Relevant clinical information was collected for all available cases and correlated with genomic subgroup. Nominal variables were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, while ordinal and continuous variables were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and 1-way ANOVA tests, respectively. Machine-learning approaches were used to predict genomic subgroup based on noninvasive clinical features.

Results: Genomic subgroups were strongly associated with tumor locations, including correlation of HH tumors with midline location, and non-NF2 tumors in anterior skull base regions. NF2 meningiomas were significantly enriched in male patients, while KLF4 and POLR2A mutations were associated with female sex. Among histologies, the results confirmed previously identified relationships, and observed enrichment of microcystic features among "mutation unknown" samples. Additionally, KLF4-mutant meningiomas were associated with larger peritumoral brain edema, while SMARCB1 cases exhibited elevated Ki-67 index. Machine-learning methods revealed that observable, noninvasive patient features were largely predictive of each tumor's underlying driver mutation.

Conclusions: Using a rigorous and comprehensive approach, this study expands previously described correlations between genomic drivers and clinical features, enhancing our understanding of meningioma pathogenesis, and laying further groundwork for the use of targeted therapies. Importantly, the authors found that noninvasive patient variables exhibited a moderate predictive value of underlying genomic subgroup, which could improve with additional training data. With continued development, this framework may enable selection of appropriate precision medications without the need for invasive sampling procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2019.8.JNS191266DOI Listing
October 2019