Publications by authors named "Aman Mishra"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: A rare case report from Nepal.

Clin Case Rep 2021 Oct 28;9(10):e05031. Epub 2021 Oct 28.

Department of Pathology Maharajgunj Medical Campus Tribhuvan University Institute of Medicine Kathmandu Nepal.

Clinicians and pathologists must be aware of the occurrence of Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease, as one of the differential diagnoses of cervical lymphadenopathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.5031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8552083PMC
October 2021

Risk factors for childhood illness and death in rural Uttar Pradesh, India: perspectives from the community, community health workers and facility staff.

BMC Public Health 2021 Nov 6;21(1):2027. Epub 2021 Nov 6.

University of Manitoba, Institute for Global Public Health, R070 Med Rehab Building, 771 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0T6, Canada.

Background: Uttar Pradesh (UP), India continues to have a high burden of mortality among young children despite recent improvement. Therefore, it is vital to understand the risk factors associated with under-five (U5) deaths and episodes of severe illness in order to deliver programs targeted at decreasing mortality among U5 children in UP. However, in rural UP, almost every child has one or more commonly described risk factors, such as low socioeconomic status or undernutrition. Determining how risk factors for childhood illness and death are understood by community members, community health workers and facility staff in rural UP is important so that programs can identify the most vulnerable children.

Methods: This qualitative study was completed in three districts of UP that were part of a larger child health program. Twelve semi-structured interviews and 21 focus group discussions with 182 participants were conducted with community members (mothers and heads of households with U5 children), community health workers (CHWs; Accredited Social Health Activists and Auxiliary Nurse Midwives) and facility staff (medical officers and staff nurses). All interactions were recorded, transcribed and translated into English, coded and clustered by theme for analysis. The data presented are thematic areas that emerged around perceived risk factors for childhood illness and death.

Results: There were key differences among the three groups regarding the explanatory perspectives for identified risk factors. Some perspectives were completely divergent, such as why the location of the housing was a risk factor, whereas others were convergent, including the impact of seasonality and certain occupational factors. The classic explanatory risk factors for childhood illness and death identified in household surveys were often perceived as key risk factors by facility staff but not community members. However, overlapping views were frequently expressed by two of the groups with the CHWs bridging the perspectives of the community members and facility staff.

Conclusion: The bridging views of the CHWs can be leveraged to identify and focus their activities on the most vulnerable children in the communities they serve, link them to facilities when they become ill and drive innovations in program delivery throughout the community-facility continuum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-12047-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8572490PMC
November 2021

Endogenous endophthalmitis and multifocal brain abscess-An interesting case.

Clin Case Rep 2021 Oct 6;9(10):e04913. Epub 2021 Oct 6.

Department of Neurology Maharajgunj Medical Campus Tribhuvan University Institute of Medicine Kathmandu Nepal.

We present an unusual case that staphylococcal brain abscess can present in an immunocompetent with endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to a septic foci and early prevention of dissemination with appropriate management to prevent its complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.4913DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8493369PMC
October 2021

Multiple jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumors and Neurofibromatosis type 1: A rare association.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2021 Aug 7;85:106178. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Department of Pathology, Maharajgunj Medical Campus, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Introduction And Importance: The association between gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), mesenchymal tumor arising from the interstitial cells of cajal and Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), an autosomal dominant disease has been reported in the literature. GIST in NF1 patients are multiple and located in the small intestine. Tumorigenesis in NF1 associated GIST is different to that of sporadic GIST and hence the treatment. Here we report a rare case of an NF1 patient with multiple jejunal GISTs.

Case Presentation: We here present a rare case of a 57-year-old male diagnosed with NF1 30 years back, presented in our emergency department with complaints of black, tarry stools later diagnosed to have multiple GIST in jejunum. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of the abdomen showed a large 10.1 × 7.33 × 6.2 cm heterogeneous, exophytic, solid mass with cystic areas originating from the jejunum. The microscopic examination of the specimen showed spindle shaped tumor cells while immunohistochemistry showed CD117 (c-KIT) and DOG-1 positivity. The primary treatment was complete surgical excision of the tumor.

Clinical Discussion: The incidence of GISTs in NF1 patient is around 6-7%; however, concomitant presence of multiple GISTs is rare. CECT of abdomen along with histopathological and immunohistochemistry studies are diagnostic. The management of GIST includes surgical and adjuvant therapy methods based on the tumorigenesis and recurrent risk stratification.

Conclusion: Early clinical suspicion and imaging aids in early detection of the tumor in patients with NF1 presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms. Postoperatively, screening for recurrence with radiology is of utmost importance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2021.106178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8319367PMC
August 2021

Incidental finding of Langerhans cell histiocytosis of temporoparietal bone - A case report.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2021 Aug 7;85:106179. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Department of Neurosurgery, Maharajgunj Medical Campus, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Introduction And Importance: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare haematological disorder affecting infants and young children and has an estimated incidence of 2-5 cases per million people per year. LCH invades the reticuloendothelial system and causes the proliferation of Langerhans cells and mature eosinophils. LCH involving the temporoparietal bone has rarely been reported in the literature.

Presentation Of Case: A ten-year-old boy presented to the Neurosurgical outpatient clinic with a swelling on the right temporoparietal region following a fall from his bicycle. Local examination revealed a single, 3 × 3 cm, non-tender, cystic, immobile swelling in the right temporoparietal region. On evaluation for recent head trauma, an incidental finding of eosinophilic granuloma was discovered on a CT scan. The FNAC was suggestive of a histiocytic lesion pertaining to a diagnosis of LCH. The patient underwent wide excision of the mass and cranioplasty. A one-month follow-up CT scan of the head had no evidence of residual or recurrent disease.

Discussion: Eosinophilic granuloma is one of the three variants of LCH and has a relatively better prognosis. Clinical diagnosis can be challenging and mandates tissue sampling for histopathological examination. Treatment modalities including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and steroid injection are used alone, or in combination, depending on the extent and severity of the disease.

Conclusion: Examining a swelling in the temporoparietal region with no other characteristic symptoms could be a case of LCH. The timely diagnosis and surgical excision with other adjuvant treatment options of this rare pediatric disease would help in a better outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2021.106179DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8319439PMC
August 2021

Amino Acid Sensing General Control Nonderepressible-2 Kinase and Immunological Programming.

Front Immunol 2017 11;8:1719. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India.

Metabolic adaptation to the changing nutrient levels in the cellular microenvironment plays a decisive role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Eukaryotic cells are equipped with nutrient sensors, which sense the fluctuating nutrients levels and accordingly program the cellular machinery to mount an appropriate response. Nutrients including amino acids play a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Therefore, over the evolution, different species have developed diverse mechanisms to detect amino acids abundance or scarcity. Immune responses have been known to be closely associated with the cellular metabolism especially amino acid sensing pathway, which influences innate as well as adaptive immune-effector functions. Thus, exploring the cross-talk between amino acid sensing mechanisms and immune responses in disease as well as in normal physiological conditions might open up avenues to explore how this association can be exploited to tailor immunological functions toward the design of better therapeutics for controlling metabolic diseases. In this review, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of various amino acid sensing pathways including general control nonderepressible-2 kinase in the control of inflammation and metabolic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.01719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5732134PMC
December 2017
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