Publications by authors named "Ama Owusu-Dommey"

3 Publications

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Scoping Review of Postinfectious Sequelae.

Foodborne Pathog Dis 2021 Jul 22:1-15. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA.

Previous economic estimates of infection with and chronic sequelae following infection lack sufficient data to establish the true burden of disease and its chronic sequelae. This scoping review aims to fill this gap by updating existing literature regarding the development of postinfectious sequelae following infection. Literature published between January 1, 2000, and November 6, 2018, in PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus was searched for a wide range of postinfectious sequelae and economic estimate terms. This scoping review includes summaries from the 108 articles covering 5 main groupings of outcomes (categories are not exclusive) including vision disorders ( = 58), psychological and mental health disorders ( = 27), neurological disorders ( = 17), fetal death and infection ( = 15), and hearing loss ( = 6), as well as a description of other outcomes reported. While the majority of the included studies assessed the incidence of these outcomes postinfection, very few followed participants long-term. These prospective studies are needed to understand the true burden of postinfectious sequelae over the life course, particularly because congenital infection with can lead to severe outcomes for newborns. This scoping review can be used as an important resource for other researchers wishing to conduct future systematic reviews and meta-analyses, as well as for policy makers interested in developing guidance for public and health care partners.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2021.0015DOI Listing
July 2021

Enteric Pathogens and Reactive Arthritis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Pathogen-Associated Reactive Arthritis.

Foodborne Pathog Dis 2021 Sep 13;18(9):627-639. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.

The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the proportion of postinfectious reactive arthritis (ReA) after bacterial enteric infection from one of four selected pathogens. We collected studies from PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase, which assessed the proportion of postinfectious ReA published from January 1, 2000 to April 1, 2018. Papers were screened independently by title, abstract, and full text; papers in English, Spanish, and Portuguese utilizing a case-control (CC) or cohort study design, with a laboratory confirmed or probable acute bacterial enteric infection and subsequent ReA, were included. The proportion of ReA cases was pooled between and across pathogens. Factors that can induce study heterogeneity were explored using univariate meta-regression, including region, sample size, study design, and ReA case ascertainment. Twenty-four articles were included in the final review. The estimated percentage of cases across studies describing -associated ReA ( = 11) was 1.71 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-5.84%); ( = 17) was 3.9 (95% CI 1.6-9.1%); ( = 6) was 1.0 (95% CI 0.2-4.9%); and ( = 7) was 3.4 (95% CI 0.8-13.7%). Combining all four pathogens, the estimated percentage of cases that developed ReA was 2.6 (95% CI 1.5-4.7%). Due to high heterogeneity reflected by high values, results should be interpreted with caution. However, the pooled proportion developing ReA from studies with sample sizes () <1000 were higher compared with  > 1000 (6% vs. 0.3%), retrospective cohort studies were lower (1.1%) compared with CC or prospective cohorts (6.8% and 5.9%, respectively), and those where ReA cases are identified through medical record review were lower (0.3%) than those identified by a specialist (3.9%) or self-report (12%). The estimated percentage of people who developed ReA after infection with , , , or is relatively low (2.6). In the United States, this estimate would result in 84,480 new cases of ReA annually.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2020.2910DOI Listing
September 2021

Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in the U.S.: Evidence from a representative cross-sectional survey.

Parasitol Int 2020 Dec 5;79:102175. Epub 2020 Aug 5.

Mercer University, College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy Practice, United States of America. Electronic address:

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) evaluates the epidemiology in the U.S. population of certain infectious diseases, including Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), a protozoan parasite. This study aims to evaluate the seroprevalence of T. gondii -IgG antibodies using NHANES data to identify risk factors related to T. gondii. Using NHANES 2009-10, 2011-12, and 2013-14 cycles, univariate analyses and logistic regression models were conducted to determine the relationship between T. gondii seropositivity and various risk factors. Across the three cycles, 13.3% of participants tested positive for T. gondii-IgG seroprevalence, with a significant decrease in seroprevalence from the earlier to later cycles. 53.4% of individuals with positive serology were male. The probability of testing positive for T. gondii -IgG significantly increases between four and five times from the 18-29 age group to 70-79 age group. Seroprevalence also differed by ethnicity, with Latinos of any race having two times higher odds of testing positive for T. gondii compared to other ethnicities. Other sociodemographic factors were associated with lower odds of T. gondii seropositivity, including college education, higher household income, and health insurance. Most clinical conditions were not significantly associated with T. gondii, excluding depression, which was observed in 25% of patients positive for T. gondii-IgG. Further research on the influence of this parasite on infected individuals, including predispositions for risk-taking, is needed to better understand the relationship between Toxoplasma gondii, depression, and other mental illnesses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2020.102175DOI Listing
December 2020
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