Publications by authors named "Alycia K Boutté"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Healthy Food Density is Not Associated With Diet Quality Among Pregnant Women With Overweight/Obesity in South Carolina.

J Nutr Educ Behav 2021 Feb;53(2):120-129

Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

Objective: Examine the association and moderating effect of residential location (urban/rural) on the relationship between neighborhood healthy food density and diet quality.

Design: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Health in Pregnancy and Postpartum study, a randomized trial designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain.

Participants: Pregnant women in South Carolina with prepregnancy overweight/obesity (n = 228).

Main Outcome Measures: Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI) was used to measure diet quality from 2 24-hour dietary recalls. The HEI total scores and 11 binary HEI components (those that met the standard for maximum component score vs those that did not) were calculated as dependent variables.

Analysis: Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to examine the association between healthy food density and HEI total scores and meeting the standards for maximum component scores. Healthy food density × residential location tested for moderation. P < 0.05 indicated significance.

Results: Participants' diet quality was suboptimal (mean, 52.0; SD, 11.7; range, 27-85). Healthy food density was not significantly related to HEI total scores or components, and residential location was not a moderator.

Conclusions And Implications: Diet quality was suboptimal, and there was no relationship between healthy food density and diet quality among Health in Pregnancy and Postpartum study participants. These data support examining behavioral factors that could influence diet quality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2020.11.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7888703PMC
February 2021

The role of self-efficacy and information processing in weight loss during an mHealth behavioral intervention.

Digit Health 2020 Jan-Dec;6:2055207620976755. Epub 2020 Nov 30.

Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, USA.

Self-efficacy (SE) and information processing (IP) may be important constructs to target when designing mHealth interventions for weight loss. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between SE and IP with weight loss at six-months as part of the Dietary Interventions Examining Tracking with mobile study, a six-month randomized trial with content delivered remotely via twice-weekly podcasts. Participants were randomized to self-monitor their diet with either a mobile app (n = 42) or wearable Bite Counter device (n = 39). SE was assessed using the Weight Efficacy Life-Style Questionnaire and the IP variables assessed included user control, cognitive load, novelty, elaboration. Regression analysis examined the relationship between weight loss, SE change & IP at six months. Results indicate that elaboration was the strongest predictor of weight loss (ß =-0.423, P = 0.011) among all SE & IP variables and that for every point increase in elaboration, participants lost 0.34 kg body weight.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2055207620976755DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7708700PMC
November 2020

Associations of maternal stress and/or depressive symptoms with diet quality during pregnancy: a narrative review.

Nutr Rev 2020 Jun 11. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Co-Investigator, Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

Background: Pregnancy can be a stressful time for many women; however, it is unclear if higher stress and depressive symptoms are associated with poorer diet quality during pregnancy.

Objective: The aims for this narrative review were to (1) synthesize findings of original, peer-reviewed studies that examined associations of stress and/or depressive symptoms with diet quality during pregnancy; (2) review the measurement tools used to assess stress, depressive symptoms, and diet quality; (3) identify current gaps in the extant literature; and (4) offer recommendations for future research.

Methods: A search strategy was used to identify peer-reviewed manuscripts published between January 1997 and October 2018, using the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL Complete, PsycINFO, Academic Search Complete, and Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection. The search was updated December 2019. Two reviewers independently assessed title, abstract, and full-text of the studies that met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and a quality assessment was conducted.

Results: Twenty-seven observational studies were identified in this review (21 cross-sectional and 6 longitudinal). In 22 studies, higher stress and/or depressive symptoms were associated with poorer diet quality or unhealthy dietary patterns; 5 studies found no association. Findings are mixed and inconclusive regarding the relationship among stress, depressive symptoms, and food groups related to diet quality and frequency of fast-food consumption.

Conclusions: The current data suggest stress and depressive symptoms may be a barrier to proper diet quality during pregnancy; however, variability in the assessment tools, timing of assessments, and use of covariates likely contribute to the inconsistency in study findings. Gaps in the literature include limited use of longitudinal study designs, limited use of comprehensive diet-quality indices, underrepresentation of minority women, and lack of multilevel theoretical frameworks. Studies should address these factors to better assess associations of stress and/or depressive symptoms with diet quality during pregnancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuaa019DOI Listing
June 2020

Defining Adherence to Mobile Dietary Self-Monitoring and Assessing Tracking Over Time: Tracking at Least Two Eating Occasions per Day Is Best Marker of Adherence within Two Different Mobile Health Randomized Weight Loss Interventions.

J Acad Nutr Diet 2019 09 30;119(9):1516-1524. Epub 2019 May 30.

Background: Mobile dietary self-monitoring methods allow for objective assessment of adherence to self-monitoring; however, the best way to define self-monitoring adherence is not known.

Objective: The objective was to identify the best criteria for defining adherence to dietary self-monitoring with mobile devices when predicting weight loss.

Design: This was a secondary data analysis from two 6-month randomized trials: Dietary Intervention to Enhance Tracking with Mobile Devices (n=42 calorie tracking app or n=39 wearable Bite Counter device) and Self-Monitoring Assessment in Real Time (n=20 kcal tracking app or n=23 photo meal app).

Participants/setting: Adults (n=124; mean body mass index=34.7±5.6) participated in one of two remotely delivered weight-loss interventions at a southeastern university between 2015 and 2017.

Intervention: All participants received the same behavioral weight loss information via twice-weekly podcasts. Participants were randomly assigned to a specific diet tracking method.

Main Outcome Measures: Seven methods of tracking adherence to self-monitoring (eg, number of days tracked, and number of eating occasions tracked) were examined, as was weight loss at 6 months.

Statistical Analyses Performed: Linear regression models estimated the strength of association (R) between each method of tracking adherence and weight loss, adjusting for age and sex.

Results: Among all study completers combined (N=91), adherence defined as the overall number of days participants tracked at least two eating occasions explained the most variance in weight loss at 6 months (R=0.27; P<0.001). Self-monitoring declined over time; all examined adherence methods had fewer than half the sample still tracking after Week 10.

Conclusions: Using the total number of days at least two eating occasions are tracked using a mobile self-monitoring method may be the best way to assess self-monitoring adherence during weight loss interventions. This study shows that self-monitoring rates decline quickly and elucidates potential times for early interventions to stop the reductions in self-monitoring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2019.03.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6856872PMC
September 2019

Income, Race and its Association with Obesogenic Behaviors of U.S. Children and Adolescents, NHANES 2003-2006.

J Community Health 2019 06;44(3):507-518

Department of Exercise Science Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Public Health Research Center, 921 Assembly St, 29201, Columbia, SC, USA.

Objectives: To describe the associations of income and race with obesogenic behaviors and % body fat among a large sample of U.S. children and adolescents.

Design: Data were obtained from the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. Multiple linear regression models and interactions were used to examine the associations of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary time, diet quality, and screen-time with income-to-poverty ratio and race. Separate stratified analyses explored associations among individual obesogenic behaviors within race and income groups.

Results: This study included children and adolescents (n = 3551, mean = 13.1 years, SD = 3.9 years) who were 37% Hispanic, 27% White, and 35% Black. Overall, Hispanic children/adolescents had significantly higher levels of adiposity (3.6, 95 CI = 0.9, 6.3) than white children and adolescents. Medium-income children and adolescents engaged in less MVPA (- 3.3 min, 95 CI = - 5.1, - 1.5), had poorer diet quality (- 1.1, 95 CI = - 1.9, - 0.2), and used screens less (- 33.9 min, 95 CI = - 45.4, - 22.4) than children and adolescents from low-income households. High-income children and adolescents also engaged in less MVPA (- 3.1 min, 95 CI = - 5.5, - 0.7) and used screens less (- 62.9 min, 95 CI = - 78.3, - 47.4) than children and adolescents from low-income households. However, there were significant race/ethnicity-by-income interactions for high-income Hispanic children and adolescents with diet quality (- 3.5 HEI-2010 score, 95 CI = - 6.6, - 0.4) and screen time (66.9 min, 95 CI = 24.7, 109.0). There was also a significant race/ethnicity-by-income interaction for the screen-time of Black children and adolescents from medium (33.8 min, 95% CI 0.2, 67.3) and high (75.8 min, 95% CI 34.7, 117.0) income households.

Conclusions: There appears to be a complex relationship that varies by race/ethnicity between income, obesogenic behaviors, and adiposity levels among children and adolescents. More work is needed to identify the behavioral mechanisms that are driving disparate rates of overweight and obesity among minority children and those from low-income households.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10900-018-00613-6DOI Listing
June 2019

A randomized controlled trial to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss in overweight and obese women: Health In Pregnancy and Postpartum (HIPP).

Contemp Clin Trials 2018 03 31;66:51-63. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, United States; Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, United States.

Background: Interventions to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss have yielded modest results, particularly in overweight and obese women.

Objectives: To examine the impact of a theory-based lifestyle intervention on gestational weight gain, postpartum weight loss, and related maternal and child outcomes and to examine race differences in these outcomes.

Design: A randomized controlled trial (target N=400; 200 intervention, 200 standard care; 200 African American, 200 white).

Methods: Overweight and obese African American and white women ≤16weeks gestation are recruited from obstetrics and gynecology clinics in South Carolina. Intervention participants receive two in-depth counseling sessions (early pregnancy and postpartum), telephone counseling, behavioral podcasts, and social media support that target weight self-monitoring and increasing physical activity and healthy dietary behavior practices, guided by Social Cognitive Theory. Standard care participants receive monthly mailings and a matched number of podcasts on non-weight related topics. All intervention activities last from ≤18weeks gestation to 6months after delivery. Gestational weight gain is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes are meeting gestational weight gain guidelines (inadequate, adequate, excessive), weekly rate of gestational weight gain, postpartum weight retention, physical activity and dietary behaviors, health-related quality of life, and offspring adiposity. Participants are assessed at baseline (≤16weeks gestation), 32weeks gestation, and 6 and 12months postpartum, and offspring are assessed at 6 and 12months.

Summary: HIPP is an innovative study that addresses significant gaps in the literature. Primary outcome results are expected in 2019.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2018.01.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5841597PMC
March 2018